philosophy in film

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 07, 2014 12:43 am

From time to time some folks think about AIDS and they ask themselves: Suppose this very dangerous, virulent virus was not transmitted through bodily fluids. Suppose instead it was transmitted as the flu is transmitted: airborne and [thus] was everywhere.

Can you then imagine they would point out the widespread reaction to gays if it was thought that this affliction was derived from homosexuality?

Things can always be worse, I suppose. Life is, after all, existential.

Of course, AIDS is not everywhere because it is not an airborne pathogen. But that doesn't stop any number of folks from using it as an excuse to express their own virulent fear of or hatred toward gays.

And this film unfolds at a time when there was considerably more uncertainty about the nature of the disease. The Reagan era. Reactions were more deeply rooted in the fear that just being around gays was a kind of, well, death sentence. And not just in working class communities where there was ignorance regarding a lot of things relating to homosexuality.

This all transpires in a prestigeous law office. Educated, sophisticated folks surely. But no less scared shitless about AIDS. And no less wallowing in prejudice.

Is this based on a true story?

No, but it bears similarities to events in the lives of attorneys Geoffrey Bowers and Clarence B. Cain. IMDb
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Bowers

Anyway, AIDS is truly what one might construe to be an "existential crisis". Especially back then. There is your life before and your life after you contract it. It changes how you think about a lot of things. Or it certainly can.

IMDb

Tom Hanks had to lose almost thirty pounds to appear appropriately gaunt for his courtroom scenes. Denzel Washington, on the other hand, was asked to gain a few pounds for his role. Washington, to the chagrin of Hanks, who practically starved himself for the role, would often eat chocolate bars in front of him.

The protestors outside the courthouse holding signs are based on the members of the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas, led by "Reverend" Fred Phelps. Phelps calls this movie "one of my favorite comedies".

Director Jonathan Demme wanted people not familiar with AIDS issues to see his film. He felt Bruce Springsteen would bring an audience that would not ordinarily see a movie about a gay man dying of AIDS. The movie and the song, "The Streets of Philadelphia", did a great deal to increase AIDS awareness and take some of the stigma off the disease.


The song: http://youtu.be/4z2DtNW79sQ

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_(film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/cl4B9AU45P4

PHILADELPHIA [1993]
Directed by Jonathan Demme

Walter: What's that on your forehead, pal?
Andrew: What? Where?
Walter: That... right there on your forehead.
Andrew: Oh, I got whacked in the head with a racket ball.

...

Joe: What happened to your face?
Andrew: I have AIDS.
[Joe lets go of his hand and backs away]

...

Andrew [after explaining that he got fired]: That's their story. Wanna hear mine?
Joe: How many lawyers did you go to before me?
Andrew: Nine.
Joe: Continue.

...

Joe: All right. Explain this to me like I'm a two-year-old, okay? Because there's an element to this thing that I cannot get through my thick head. Didn't you have an obligation to tell your employer you had this dreaded, deadly, infectious disease?
Andrew: That's not the point. From the day they hired me to the day I was fired I served my clients consistently, thoroughly, with absolute excellence. If they hadn't fired me, that's what I'd be doing today.
Joe: And they don't want to fire you for having AIDS...so, in spite of your brilliance, they make you look incompetent. Thus, the mysterious lost files. Is that what you're trying to tell me?
Andrew: That's correct. I was sabotaged.
Joe: I don't buy it, Counselor.
Andrew: That's very disappointing.
Joe: I don't see a case.
Andrew: I have a case. If you don't want it for personal reasons...
Joe: Thank you. That's correct. I don't.
Andrew: Well, thank you for your time, Counselor.
Joe: I'm sorry about what happened to you. It's a bitch, you know?


Of course the first thing Joe does is go to his doctor to make sure he doesn't have AIDS -- just from being in the same room with Andy and shaking his hand.

Doctor: The HIV virus can only be transmitted through the exchange of bodily fluids... namely, blood, semen and vaginal secretions.
Joe: Right. Yeah. But isn't it true they're finding out new things about this disease every day? Now, you tell me today there's no danger. Go home. I go home. I pick up my little baby girl. Then I find out six months from now on the news or something: Whoops! Made a mistake. Yeah, you can carry it on your shirt or your clothes or...

...

Wife: You have a problem with gays, Joe?
Joe: Not especially.
Wife: Yes, you do. How many gays do you know?
Joe: How many do you know?
Wife: Lots. Karen Berman, my aunt Theresa...Cousin Tommy who lives in Rochester... Eddie Meyers from the office... Stanley, the guy who's putting in our kitchen cabinets.
Joe: Aunt Theresa is gay? That beautiful, sensuous, voluptuous woman is a lesbian? Since when?
Wife: Probably since she was born.
Joe: Oh, man. All right. Well, hey, I admit it, okay? I'm prejudiced. I don't like homosexuals. There. You got me. I mean, the way these guys do that...thing, don't they get confused? You know, I don't want to be in bed with anybody who's stronger than me...or who has more hair on their chest. Now, you can call me old-fashioned, conservative. Just call me a man. Besides, I think you have to be a man to understand how really disgusting that whole idea is anyway. Think about those guys pumping up together... trying to be macho and faggot at the same time. I mean, I can't stand that shit. Hey, I'm bein' totally honest with you, okay?

...

Joe [to his wife]: I got a question for you. Would you accept a client if you were constantly thinking, "I don't want this person to touch me. I don't want him to even breathe on me"?
Wife: Not if I was you, honey.

...

Joe: The Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against otherwise qualified handicapped persons who are able to perform the duties required by their employment. Although the ruling did not address the specific issue of HIV and AIDS discrimination...
Andrew: ...subsequent decisions have held that AIDS is protected as a handicap under law, not only because of the physical limitations it imposes, but because the prejudice surrounding AIDS exacts a social death which precedes...which precedes the physical one.
Joe: This is the essence of discrimination: formulating opinions about others not based on their individual merits, but rather on their membership in a group with assumed characteristics.

...

Charles [after learning of Andrew's discrimination lawsuit]: Now, regarding Andy, I want to know everything regarding his personal life. Does he frequent those pathetic bars on Chestnut Street? What other homosexual facilities does he go to? What deviant groups or organizations does he secretly belong to?

...

Bob: Let's make a fair settlement offer and put this tragic business behind us.
Charles: Andy brought AIDS into our offices into our men's room. He brought AIDS to our annual goddamn family picnic.
Walter: We ought to be suing him, Bob.

...

Joe [to the jury]: Forget everything you've seen on television and in the movies. There's not gonna be any last-minute surprise witnesses. Nobody's gonna break down on the stand with a tearful confession. You're gonna be presented with a simple fact: Andrew Beckett was fired. You'll hear two explanations for why he was fired: Ours and theirs. It is up to you to sift through layer upon layer of truth...until you determine for yourselves which version sounds the most true.

...

Joe [to the jury]: There are certain points that I must prove to you. Point number one: Andrew Beckett was...is...a brilliant lawyer. Point number two: Andrew Beckett, afflicted with a debilitating disease made the understandable, the personal, the legal choice to keep the fact of his illness to himself. Point number three: His employers discovered his illness. And, ladies and gentlemen, the illness I'm referring to is AIDS. Point number four: They panicked. And in their panic, they did what most of us would like to do with AIDS...which is just get it and everybody who has it as far away from the rest of us as possible. Now, the behavior of Andrew Beckett's employers may seem reasonable to you. It does to me. After all, AIDS is a deadly, incurable disease. But no matter how you come to judge Charles Wheeler and his partners in ethical, moral and human terms, the fact of the matter is when they fired Andrew Beckett because he had AIDS they broke the law.

...

Belinda: Fact: Andrew Beckett's performance on the job varied from competent, good, to oftentimes mediocre...to sometimes flagrantly incompetent. Fact: He claims he's the victim of lies and deceit. Fact: It was Andrew Beckett who lied...going to great lengths to conceal his disease from his employers. Fact: He was successful in his duplicity. The partners at Wyant, Wheeler did not know that Andrew Beckett had AIDS when they fired him. Fact: Andrew Beckett is dying. Fact: Andrew Beckett is angry because his lifestyle, his reckless behavior has cut short his life. And in his anger, his rage, he is lashing out. And he wants someone to pay.

...

Joe: Let me tell you something. These people make me sick. But a law's been broken. You remember the law?
Bartender: At least we agree on one thing, Joe.
Joe: What's that, Charlie?
Bartender: Tutti-fruttis make me sick too.

...

Lawyer: Ms. Benedict, how did you contract the AIDS virus?
Ms. Benedict: Through a transfusion. I lost a lot of blood giving birth to my second child.
Lawyer: So, in your case there was no behavior on your part which caused you to be infected with the virus. It was something you were unable to avoid. Isn't that correct?
Ms. Benedict: I guess. But I don't consider myself any different from anyone else with this disease. I'm not guilty. I'm not innocent. I'm just trying to survive.

...

Joe: Did you have something to do with this file being lost accidentally on purpose? Did you have anything to do with this file being misplaced?
Jamey: Absolutely not.
Joe: Are you a homosexual?
Jamey [startled]: What?
Joe: Answer the question! Are you a homo? A faggot? A punk? A queen, pillow biter, fairy? Bootie snatcher, rump roaster? Are you gay?
Lawyer: Objection!
Judge: Order!
Belinda: Where did this come from? Suddenly counsel's attacking his own witness? Mr. Collins' sexual orientation has nothing to do with this case.
Judge: Please have a seat, Miss Conine. Would you approach the bench, Mr. Miller?
[Joe approaches the bench]
Judge: Could you kindly share with me exactly what's going on inside your head...because at this moment, I don't have a clue.
Joe: Your Honor...everybody in this courtroom is thinking about sexual orientation, sexual preference...whatever you want to call it. Who does what to whom and how they do it. They're looking at Andrew Beckett. They're wondering about it. They're looking at Mr. Wheeler, Miss Conine, even you, Your Honor. Trust me, I know they're looking at me and thinking about it. So let's get it out in the open. Let's get it out of the closet. Because this case is not just about AIDS, is it? So let's talk about what this case is really all about: The general public's hatred, our loathing, our fear of homosexuals...and how that climate of hatred and fear translated into the firing of this particular homosexual...my client, Andrew Beckett.

...

Judge: In this courtroom, Mr.Miller, justice is blind to matters of race, creed, color, religion, and sexual orientation.
Joe: With all due respect, your honor, we don't live in this courtroom, do we?

...

Andrew: Congratulations, Counselor.
Joe: Congratulations?
Andrew: You've survived what I assume to be your first gay party intact.
Joe: Let me tell you something. When you're brought up the way most people are in this country...there's not a whole lot of discussion about homosexuality...or what do you call it, alternate lifestyles. As a kid you're taught that queers are funny, queers are weird. Queers dress up like their mother, that they're afraid to fight...that they're a danger to little kids. That all they want to do is get into your pants. That pretty much sums up the general thinking, if you want to know the truth about it.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 07, 2014 9:58 pm

From the director of 6ixty Nin9 above.

No box stuffed with cash here though. Instead, it's about suicide and love. About two people who could not possibly be less alike coming together and changing everything. Or everything that needs to be changed in order to motivate one not to commit suicide and the other to, well, she changes too. Kind of.

Kenji is a librarian. Which may or may not explain why Kenji is also anal-compulsive to a fault. Even his suicide note will come to encompass precision itself: straight to the point: "This is bliss".

Until his asshole brother shows up. Yukio. A yakuza. Okay, so maybe later. But then he goes on to meet the beautiful and mysterious Noi. And that becomes bliss instead. Cicuitously as it were.

How circuitous? Well, it is only because Noi's sister Nid spots Kenji about to commit suicide [again] by jumping off a bridge [and is struck dead by a passing car] that they meet at all. Him a full blown neat freak and her a full blown slob.

With one of the strangest endings I have ever seen. I mean really strange.

Also, with a really gorgeous soundtrack: http://youtu.be/xkJk1GyYhf8

IMDb

Yukio Mishima, the author of "The Last Lizard", the book featured in the film, committed Harakiri (suicide by stabbing yourself in the stomach with a short knife). This is perhaps one of the reasons why Kenji likes the author.

The Thai title means, literally, "Love Story, a Little, a Lot" with a play of words on "Noi" and "Nid" which means "few" and "small" respectively. The two words are also the names of the sisters in the movie so the title can also means "Love Story of Noi and Nid, a Lot". Another interpretation can be "A small/little Love Story that is a lot". The actresses who play Nid and Noi are real sisters.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Life_in_the_Universe
trailer: http://youtu.be/tU2QhICrdgY

LAST LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE [Ruang Rak Noi Nid Mahasan] 2003
Written in part and directed by Pen-Ek Ratanaruang

Kenji [voiceover]: My name is Kenji. This could be me three hours from now. Why do I want to kill myself? I don't know...I wouldn't kill myself for the same reasons as other suicidal people. Money problems...Broken heart...Hopelessness...No, not me. Many books say "Death is relaxing." Did you know that? No need to follow the latest trends...No need to keep pace with the rest of the world...No more e-mail...No more telephone...It'll be like taking a nap... Before waking up refreshed and ready to begin your next life. That's what they say.

...

Yukio [to Kenji]: You can't just read, you'll go crazy.

...

Yukio: Suicide again?
[he looks up at the noose]
Yukio: Going to hang yourself this time?

...

Takashi: You can't go back to Japan. The boss will kill you.
Yukio: But I've been with him a long time. He's just in a bad mood.
Takashi: A bad mood? You fucked his daughter! If you fucked my daughter, I'd cut your dick off and stuff it in your mouth!
Yukio: Really? You've seen too many yakuza movies.


...

Noi: Did you fuck Jon?
Nid: Who told you that?
Noi: Did you fuck him? Jon told me everything today.
Nid: What? What did that dickhead tell you? Yeah, he's a dickhead. He's shit!
Noi: So why did you have to go fuck a shit like that? You couldn't leave him alone because he's my shit, right?

...

Noi: What are you doing? How dare you come in here? Get out! Get the fuck out! GET THE FUCK OUT OF MY HOUSE!
Kenji: I'm sorry.

...

Noi: Why you not go home?
Kenji: It smells too bad.
Noi: What?
Kenji: My house smells bad.
Noi: Smell bad? Why?
Kenji: Two dead people inside.

...

Noi [to Kenji]: Hey! You need a woman.

...

Kenji: You're beautiful.
Noi: Enough. You're smelly.
Kenji: Really?
Noi: Yes.
Kenji: OK.
Noi: You should take a bath.
Kenji: Okay, I will.
Noi: Now.
Kenji: Now?
Noi: Now...I say now.

...

Noi: You want to see me again?
Kenji: Yes.
Noi: When?
Kenji: One day.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:08 pm

Based on the account of an actual serial rapist/murderer who had run amok in South Korea in the 1980s. He was never caught. The crimes remain unsolved to this day. At wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwaseong_serial_murders

And in South Korea [back then especially] the cops tended to be considerably more agressive in their pursuit of...justice. For example, take the plight of Kwang-ho.

And even bringing in a top notch detective from Seoul didn't help. In fact the first thing the local detective does is mistake him for the killer and beat him up.

On the other hand, most of these cops and CSI detectives did not strike you as all that particularly...bright. If there was any possible way to fuck up a crime investigation, they had it covered. Think the Keystone Cops on steroids.

Still, it will always be perplexing how the minds of killers like this work. They do these very sick and brutal things for reasons that are all twisted up inside their heads...and in ways that are almost impossible to nail down. We can only hope that we do not become their next victim. Especially if you are a young and pretty woman. And inclined to wear red. Then the element of sex comes into play and these labyrinths are often the most convoluted of all. Here's a man who always requested one particular song to be played on the radio. But only on rainy nights. And then, after hearing the song, he goes out to rape and murder someone. Or so it seemed.

One interpretation of the ending:

Park visits the scene of the first murder simply for nostalgia's sake, since not solving that case was one of his deepest regrets. Then, from the girl he finds out that someone else has been visiting the scene, and deduces that most likely that one is the murderer. He asks the girl what did he look like (perhaps a final and faint attempt to solve the case) but she can't provide any more detail other than he was just an ordinary looking guy, reminding him again of his failure. Then he looks at the camera hoping that the real murderer (the movie is based on a true story) will be watching the movie and perhaps feel a little bit of guilt.

IMDb

Beginning in June 2000, it took Joon-ho Bong a year to write the script for Memories of Murder (2003), yet he has stated that: "For the first six months, I didn't write a line of the script. I just did research."

Despite the film being based on a series of real murders in the Korean provincial town of Hwaeseong during the 1980s, Joon-ho Bong also drew a lot inspiration from a play called 'Come See Me' which dramatized the incidents, to the extent that he stated in an interview: "If it weren't for KIM Gwang-rim's play [Come See Me], I would have had a lot of problems establishing the structure." While he also gained the idea for the depiction of the era from the graphic novel 'From Hell' by the writer Alan Moore, which was given to Bong by the journalist Tony Rayns as a gift.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memories_of_Murder
trailer: http://youtu.be/NtOutxGJK5o

MEMORIES OF MURDER [Salinui Chueok] 2003
Written in part and directed by Joon-ho Bong

Detective Park: Who received the call on this? The crime site is getting ruined! Damn forensics team isn't here yet! This is a mess! Why does this shit happen to me?! How can I investigate like this?

And that's right before the tractor runs over the most crucial piece of evidence.

Detective Park [looking over at the forensics team]: Jesus, look at those sliding fools!

...

Detective Park: Kwang-ho. Let's talk man to man. You see a pretty girl, you want to do her.

...

Detective Park [to detective Seo]: You should have told me. My mistake. But how can a detective be such a poor fighter?!

...

Detective Park [to Kwang-ho who is mentally retarded]: Women hate this face, don't they?
[Kwang-ho nods]
Detective Park: They grimace and all fucking run away.
Kwang-ho: It's true. I'll kill them all. Everyone who grimaces at my face. I'll kill them all. Those women who grimace, they're all in my head.


Then they get his "confession": cased solved!

Chief: Detective Seo, you're dumping shit on cooked rice here!
Dectective Seo: I told you before Kwang-ho isn't guilty! Chief....the cords around their necks we're tied with three tight knots. Look at Kwang-ho's webbed hands. Could he do that? Even a child can see it!

...

Detective Cho [to Kwang-ho]: I only beat you up because I care about you.

...

Detective Park: Always in rape cases, at the crime scene, there's one or two of these hairs left behind.
Chief: So?
Detective Park: I'm saying the criminal must not have any hair down there.
Chief: You mean hairless?
Detective Park: That's right, hairless. A total baldie. For example, a Buddhist monk who shaved the hair down there. The perfect crime!

...

Detective Park [to the chief after hearing Kwon's radio theory]: Baldies...
Chief: But how do you investigate? Pull down the pants of passing men?


Uh, nope. Park puts on his Keystone Cop thinking cap instead. Cut to the bathhouse. Then to the fortune teller.

Rape suspect: But...is jerking off a crime?

...

Detective Seo: Name: Ahn Mi-seon, age 28. Estimated time of death, last night between 7:30 and 8:00.
Chief: That's the time you and dectective Park were fighting like madmen. Right?

...

Technician in morgue: There's something in the vagina... Looks like a peach... Nine pieces.
Detective Park [to dectective Seo]: Do you see this kind of thing in Seoul often?

...

Park Hyun-gyu [suspected of being the killer to the detectives]: Even kids in this town know you torture innocent people!

...

Detective Seo: No eyewinesses, not one piece of evidence. We need something, shit. Just a confession will do. Just need to beat that bastard to an inch of his life.
Detective Park: You've changed...

...

Detective Seo [to detective Park]: Kwang-ho. I always wanted to ask you. When you dragged him up the mountain, he talked about Hayng-sook's death in so much detail....


Bingo: He saw the nurderer. But they manage to fuck this up too. For one thing, Kwang-ho gets hit by a train and dies.

Detective Park: What's wrong?
Detective Seo [reading a DNA report from America that cannot pin the murders on Park Hyun-gyu]: There's a mistake. This document is a lie. I don't need it.

...

Park [no longer a detective]: Did you see his face?
[the schoolgirl nods]
Park: What did he look like?
Schoolgirl: Well... kind of plain.
Park: In what way?
Schoolgirl: Just... ordinary.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 09, 2014 10:34 pm

Ordinary people. Of course that will always be understood differently in different historical, cultural and experiential contexts. No getting around that conundrum right?

Here the ordinary people are composed largely of upper middle class American citizens in the late 20th century. All white. All comfortably enscounsed in exurbia. At least on the surface. Is that important to note? Well, it can be, sure. All I know is it is hard to imagine a family farther removed from the one I grew up in.

But these "ordinary people" now find themselves in an extraordinary set of circumstances. How ordinary will they remain? Do they rise to the occasion? Or will it sink them? Why one and not the other? And is it really true that we can only account for these things one set of circumstances at a time? Or are there lessons to be learned that transcend the uniqueness of each particular challenge?

And for each one of us [sooner or later] a time will come when we are challenged. And others will judge us. And almost always by their own frame of reference. It does get complicated, doesn't it?

And what do demographics really matter when you lose someone you dearly love. Or if you feel responsible in some manner for the loss? Here it is all about figuring out what you either can or cannot control. And knowing in particular that you will never, ever be able to control everything. Or even really understand it. And always that gap between the tragedy then and the life you have to live now from day to day. We all experience it differently.

Then there's the part where the rest of the world just goes on living.

IMDb

The film and source novel's "Ordinary People" title comes from Judith Guest's book: "They are ordinary people, after all. For a time they had entered the world of the newspaper statistic; a world where any measure you took to feel better was temporary, at best, but that is over. This is permanent. It must be." The novel is a school text on the English curricula at many American high schools.

Robert Redford decided to do the film because the story's family reminded him of his own in the way it talked around issues.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_People
trailer: http://youtu.be/UZYHe8IAlto

ORDINARY PEOPLE [1980]
Directed by Robert Redford

Teacher: Conrad, what's your theory on Jude Fawley? Was he powerless in the grip of circumstances...or could he have helped himself?
Conrad: I don't... Powerless? He thought he was.
Joel: He was a jerk. He was hung up on morals. It was senseless.
Teacher: That's too easy, Joel. Paul?
Paul: I found the book really hard to follow. I couldn't figure it out.


American Youth discuss Jude the Obscure by Thoamas Hardy.

Dr. Berger: How long were you in the hospital? Four months. What did you do?
Conrad: I tried to off myself. Doesn't it say that there?
Dr. Berger: It doesn't say what your method was.
Conrad: Double-edged Super Blue.

...

Dr.Berger: What needed changing?
Conrad: I'd like to be more in control.
Dr. Berger: Why?
Conrad: So people can quit worrying about me.
Dr. Berger: Well, I'll tell you something. I'll be straight with you. Okay? I'm not big on control. But it's your money.
Conrad: So to speak.
Dr. Berger: So to speak.

...

Coach: Are you on medication? Tranquilizers? Anything?
Conrad: No. No. Sir.
Coach: Did I ask you if they gave you shock?
Conrad: Yeah. You asked me. Yeah. They did.
Coach: I'm no doctor, Jarrett. But I wouldn't let them put electricity in my head.

...

Dr. Berger: Is any place easy?
Conrad: The hospital was.
Dr. Berger: It was? Why?
Conrad: Because nobody hid anything there.

...

Karen: Are you seeing a doctor?
Conrad: Yeah. I'm seeing one. Are you?
Karen: Uh, Dr. Crawford gave me a name. I went for a while. It didn't work. He told me the things I already knew. Finally, I decided the only one who can help me is myself. At least that's what my dad says. But if it's something you want to do that's what you should be doing.
Conrad: I don't know how long I'll keep it up. I sort of got shoved into it.

...

Conrad: I miss it sometimes. The hospital. I really do.
Karen: But things have to change. You know?
Conrad: But that's where we laughed.
Karen: But that was a hospital. This is the real world.
Conrad: Yeah, I guess you're right.

...

Conrad: When I let myself feel, all I feel is lousy.
Dr. Berger: Oh well excuse me, I never promised you a rose garden.
Conrad: Oh fuck you Berger.
Dr. Berger: What?
Conrad: FUCK YOU!
Dr. Berger: Hey, that's it!


What's it? Man I have been there so many times myself with shrinks. What works? What doesn't? What should work? What shouldn't? Or maybe all he really needs is to fall in love.

Dr. Berger: What shit have you pulled? What shit? You can find one example. Don't say you tried suicide. What have you done lately?
Conrad: I'll never be forgiven for that. Never. You can't get out the blood in her towels...and in her rug. Everything had to be pitched. The bathroom tile had to be regrouted. She fired the maid because she couldn't dust the goddamn living room right. If you think I'll forgive...she's gonna forgive me...
Dr. Berger: What?
Conrad: I think I just figured something out.
Dr. Berger: What?
Conrad: Who it is who can't forgive who.

...

Jeannine [in restaurant booth Conrad sits with Jeannine, the suicide attempt scars on Conrad's wrist are displayed]: Did it hurt?
Conrad: I don't remember, really.
Jeannine: You don't want to talk about it?
Conrad: I've never really talked about it. To doctors. But, not to anyone else. You're the first who's asked.
Jeannine: Why did you do it?
Conrad: Uh... I don't know. It was like... falling into a hole. It keeps getting bigger and bigger and you can't escape. All of a sudden, it's inside...and you're the hole. You're trapped. And it's all over. Something like that. It's not really scary...except when you think back on it. 'Cause you know what you were feeling...


Then "the guys" come in. So much for suicide....

Conrad [on phone]: Hello. Hello. Is Karen there?
Karen's mother on phone: She... Bill.
Bill [Karen's father]: Hello.
Conrad: Is Karen there? This is Conrad Jarrett. I'm a friend of hers.
Bill: Karen's dead.
Conrad [shocked]: What? What?
Bill: She killed herself.

...

Conrad [to Dr. Berger]: It must be somebody's fault...or there's no point!

...

Conrad: We shouldn't have gone out there. We should have come back when it started to look bad.
Dr. Berger: Okay, so you made a mistake.
Conrad: Why did he let go? Why?
Dr. Berger: Maybe you were stronger. Did it ever occur to you that you might be stronger?

...

Ward: Beth, we don't want anything from you; Audrey, Cal, Connie and Me, we just want you to be happy.
Beth: Happy?! Ward, you tell me the definition of happy. But first you better make sure your kids are good and safe, that they haven't fallen of a horse, been hit by a car, or drown in that swimming pool you're so proud of!
Audrey: Oh Beth!
Beth: Then, you come and tell me how to be happy!

...

Calvin [to Beth]: We would've been all right...would have made it all the way...if there hadn't been any mess. But you can't handle mess. You need everything neat and easy. I don't know. Maybe you can't love anybody. It was so much Buck. When Buck died it's as though you buried all your love with him. I don't understand that. Maybe it wasn't even Buck. Maybe it was just you. Maybe, finally, it was the best of you that you buried. But whatever it was...I don't know who you are. I don't know what we've been playing at. So I was crying. Because I don't know if I love you anymore. And I don't know what I'll do without that.
}
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 11, 2014 8:54 pm

Amnesia is always a plot device that a filmmaker can use to explore themes that revolve around identity and reality and mind. How do they come together and intertwine from the cradle to the grave?

And why do we choose to remember some things and not others? And how can we know for sure that what we do choose to remember is what in fact actually occured? And what happens when others remember the same events differently?

And then the part where memory and identity and reality and mind are merely functions of the brain -- and perhaps not even within the autonomous reach of "I".

Memoryrealitypastpresent. Lifedeath.

Here the memories and the loss of memories revolve around a tragic automobile accident -- the consequences of which are nothing short of surreal. The survivor, Hiroshi Takagi, is a medical student and the class he is in are now dissecting cadavers. It is then that he realizes that the cadaver assigned to him is the woman he once loved -- Ryoko Ooyama, the woman who died in the automobile accident he was in. The accident was ruled to be the fault of the other driver but that is not how Ryoko's parents choose to remember it. And we can only remember what the director chooses to impart to us up on the screen.

What really unfolded between Hiroshi and Ryoko before the crash? What is the "true" reality here? And what role does the beautiful and mysterious Ikumi play in the reconstruction of that reality? And in the construction of a new one? And the role played by autoerotic asphyxia -- is that vital to the plot here or entirely extraneous?

Sex and death.

Look for the world's thinnest woman. Or one of them.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vital_(film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/nih18elH03U

VITAL [2004]
Written and directed by Shinya Tsukamoto

Instructor: The ovum, a product of almost pure chance, by means of cellular growth, divergence and migration, creates an organism.

...

Instructor: This person experienced trauma to the frontal lobe section. The area is responible for personality and memory. From this we can conclude the following: Human character is not constant.

...

Instructor: The brain and the spinal cord form the central nervous system. Nerve cells are concentrated in this area. I wonder, then, where the soul lies?

...

Instructor: Beneath this, however, there is the vast realm of the unconscious. It is here that our suppressed desires can cause deep mental conflict as they strive to realize themsleves.

...

Student [looking at the cadaver]: Is it common for the subject to be so young?
Technician: No, it is very rare.
Student: I wonder how she died?
Technician: You'll find out as you dissect.

...

Doctor [holding a dissected heart in hid hand]: How many times did this heart beat? 70 times a minute is 4200 times an hour. In a day? Well, 24 times that. Then times 365 for a year. How many times if you live to be 80? And yet my TV set broke after just 6 years.

...

Ryoko's father: Why have you come here? Just go away? Your parents were very sincere about their grief. What I really want to see is your sincerity. You were driving when it happened. I still feel you murdered my daughter. If you want to mourn her, do it when you truly remember her.
Hiroshi: I'm already starting to rmemeber. Right now, at college, I'm doing my dissection practice. There something I need to know, if you can tell me. I think Ryoko...is on the dissection table. I don't quite understand it.
Ryoko's father [aghast]: Are you serious? Well? Tell me it's not true! You heartless fuck! You want to know if it's her, right? How the hell should I know?! Just before she died, she told us she was leaving her body to science. We didn't even know you could do such a thing. And now you think you're poking around inside her?!

...

Ryoko [sitting next to Hiroshi in a car on the highway]: Hiroshi, what would it be like to crash into something?

...

Ikumi: What's gotten into you? Why are you chasing a dead woman? What about those of us still living? All your happy false memories. What chance do I have against all those?

...

Instructor: Our four-month dissection program is now over. Make sure you return the bodies to their original form. Check that bones and organs have been replaced and the kidneys are on the correct side. Put the sash next to the hands. The tabi and sandals go by the feet. The triangular cloth and the headdress go by the head. Drape the kimono over the body. Place the cane next to the right hand. Drape the shroud over the face. Lay the flowers inside. Now place the lid on the coffin. We will now close our eyes and pay our last respects. The coffins will be taken now.


Later the coffins and all that is in them will be burned to ashes. The rituals to blunt what is in the end just the brutal facts of existence. Of life and death. Of being and nothingness.

Ryoko: You know I often wonder...if you could see some paert of your life again, years after you die, which part would you choose?
Hiroshi: The last images of the last Martian robot. Mankind's final memory.
Ryoko: You still have a long time to live, so you can't answer properly. As for me...
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Jul 12, 2014 8:40 pm

With gangsters you figure this: that what they do to each other is only what the cocksuckers deserve. But when a kid gets all tangled up in it it gets considerably more problematic. Especially when the kid doesn't have a clue regarding what "business" his father is in. And then when he finds out the hard way. In the interim though he sees a lot of things that he really doesn't understand much at all. And then one day he does.

How does he find this out? Just plain curiousity about his dad. He needed to confirm that is dad was a hero. And then [just like that] it all comes to revolve around the consequences of this one fortuitous incident. But this is what fascinates some more than others: the butterfly effect in human interaction.

Then the part about family conflicts. One family being your own flesh and blood kin and the other family being, well, you know which one. And sometimes your obligations here can get really, really fuzzy. As in, say, when they become a matter of life and death. And you never really know what will finally push a man over the edge among folks like this. You never really know where to draw the lines. Stress begets more stress still. And that begets consequences.

And [obviously] some of these thugs are more inclined to be honorable than are others. Yes, even a thug can have a code. But there is always a hierarchy in crime. And some are allowed to be more honorable than others.

And what does all of this ultimately come down to? The fucking money of course.

On the other hand, the events here all unfold in the early years of the Great Depression. And that was a time when there were a lot more desparate men stumbling around willing to do whatever it took to, among other things, sustain their very existence. And that of their loved ones. It's just that these slimey bastards took things to the extreme. Or were ordered to. All we can do then is bet on the least contemptible ones.

Personal observation: This would have been a better film had it not decided to become a situation comedy [for about 15 minutes] once the father and the son were out on the road. And the end could have been better.

IMDb

The movie is loosely based on actual events and a real enforcer for mobster John Looney, who was betrayed by him.

Notice that Michael Jr. isn't eating his pie and ice cream in the diner when he and his father are talking about the money. According to Sam Mendes, in earlier takes Tyler Hoechlin gobbled up his pie, not considering that he would have to perform the scene again and again. By the time they got to the take that's in the film Hoechlin was stuffed and couldn't take another bite. Tom Hanks by contrast knew to put small amounts of food into his mouth and eat slowly.

One of the locations for one of the bank robberies was physically perfect but the wrong way round. There was only room to shoot from right to left and not vice versa. So production designer Dennis Gassner and his team had to dress the location, reversing street signs, license plates and even switching steering wheels on all the cars.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_to_Perdition
trailer: http://youtu.be/IjbSYkY5hVA

ROAD TO PERDITION [2004]
Directed by Sam Mendes

Michael Jr. [voiceover]: There are many stories about Michael Sullivan. Some say he was a decent man. Some say there was no good in him at all. But I once spent 6 weeks on the road with him, in the winter of 1931. This is our story.

...

Peter: Why are you always smiling?
Connor: 'Cause it's all so fuckin' hysterical.

...

Peter: What's Papa's job?
Michael Jr.: He works for Mr. Rooney.
Peter: Why?
Michael Jr.: Well, Papa didn't have a father...so Mr. Rooney looked after him.
Peter: I know that, but what's his job?
Michael Jr: He goes on missions for Mr. Rooney. They're very dangerous. That's why he brings his gun.

...

Michael Sr: We're just talking to him, right?
Connor: Sure.

...

Michael Sr [looking down at Michael Jr]: Oh, Jesus...You saw everything?
[Michael Jr. nods]
Michael Sr: Jesus.

...

Michael Jr: Does Mama know?
Michael Sr: Your mother knows I love Mr. Rooney. When we had nothing, he gave us a home...a life...and we owe him.

...

Jack: Mr. Rance met with John and me earlier to make another bid for our involvement in the unions.
John: And I told Mr. Rance what I told him before: What men do after work is what made us rich. No need to screw them at work as well.

...

Michael Sr: You gonna frisk me?
Frank the Bouncer: Should I?
Michael Sr: It might be a good idea.

...

Note written to Tony Calvino: KILL SULLIVAN AND ALL DEBTS ARE PAID
Michael Sr [knowing what that means]: Michael....

...

Connor: Pa, I'm sorry.
John: What did you do?! Stupid!
Connor: The kid would've talked. I'm sorry.
John: Goddamn you! Goddamn you! I curse!...The fucking day!...You were born! I curse it!

...

Michael sr [to Michael Jr]: This house is not our home anymore. It's just an empty building.

...

Kelly: You have friends in Ireland, Mike. Why don't you take Peter and leave?
Michael Sr: I can't take Peter. He's dead. So where's Connor?
Kelly: He's in hiding.
Michael Sr: Where?
Kelly: You know I can't tell you that. You think sticking a gun to my head is gonna make any difference to me? If I tell you, I'm a dead man anyway. We both are. Think, Mike. Don't be stupid. I'm just the messenger.
Michael Sr [lowers his gun]: Then give Mr. Rooney a message for me.
Kelly [relieved]: What is it?
[Sullivan shoots him dead]

...

Frank Nitti [after Michael Sr. requests a sanctioned reprisal against Conner Rooney]: All these years you've been living under the protection of people who care about you, and those same people are protecting you now, including me. So, if you go ahead with this, if you open that door, you're walking through it alone, and all that loyalty, and all that trust will no longer exist for you. And Mike, you won't make it. Not on your own, and not with a little boy.
Michael Sr: You're protecting him already?
Frank Nitti: We're protecting our interests, Mike.

...

Nitti: You heard?
Connor: Dad, listen to me. He's in the building. You can end this now. Take him now.
John: Connor, get upstairs.
[Connor leaves the room]
John [aloud to himself]: God help me. God help me. What do I do?
Nitti: You think objectively. And you make your choice. What would you do if Sullivan were just some guy?
John: God help me. Make it quick.
Nitti: And the kid?
John [anguished]: Oh, Christ. No, no.
Nitti: One day the kid becomes a man...Think he won't remember?
John: I said not the kid.
Nitti: All right. I know who to call....There's a guy who's done some work for us in the past. He's gifted.

...

Michael Sr [as Maguire loads his camera]: Is that, uh...your profession or...your pleasure?
Maguire: Both, I guess. To be paid to do what you love...ain't that the dream?

...

Maguire [to Michael Sr]: I shoot the dead. Dead bodies, that is. I don't kill them.


...

Michael Jr: So, what are you gonna do?
Michael Sr: Something I can't do alone. You have to listen to me now, okay? Or else both of us are dead. I have to make Capone give up Connor. There's one thing Chicago loves more than anything...and that's their money.

...

Mr. McDougal: Well this is a pleasant surprise. I wasn't expecting another deposit until the end of the month.
Michael Sr: Actually, I'm making a withdrawal.

...

Michael Sr: And I want dirty money only, everything you're holding for Capone that's off the books. Open the safe.
Mr. McDougal: You're insane. You know they'll find out who you are.
Michael Sr: The name's Sullivan. You want me to spell it?

...

Betty the Waitress: So what brings you guys to the middle of nowhere?
Michael Jr.: We're bank robbers.

...

Michael Jr: So when do I get my share of the money?
Michael Sr: Well... how much do you want?
Michael Jr: Two hundred dollars.
Michael Sr: Okay. Deal.
[Michael Jr stops eating and thinks for awhile]
Michael Jr: Could I have had more?
Michael Sr: You'll never know.

...

Rance: What do you think you're going to accomplish by interfering with our business, Mr. Sullivan?
Michael Sr: This has nothing to do with your business.
Rance: It's all business. That's what you fail to grasp. And in business, you must have something to trade. And you, Mr. Sullivan, have nothing to trade. Especially not for anyone as valuable as Connor Rooney.

...

Michael Jr.: Did you like Peter more than me?
Michael Sr: No. I loved you both the same.
Michael Jr.: You were always... different with me.
Michael Sr: Was I?
[the father thinks for a while]
Michael Sr: Well, I suppose it was because Peter was just such a sweet little boy, you know? And you...you were more like me. And I...I didn't want you to be.

...

Michael Sr: He murdered Annie and Peter!
John: There are only murderers in this room! Michael! Open your eyes! This is the life we chose, the life we lead. And there is only one guarantee: none of us will see heaven.

...

Michael Sr: Think. Think. They're protecting him now, but when you're gone, they won't need him. This ends with Connor dead regardless.
John: That may be...but you are asking me to give you the key to his room so you can walk in put a gun to his head and pull the trigger. I can't do that.

...

Michael Jr.: What are you going to do?
Michael Sr: Just one last thing, and then it's done.

...

John [to Michael Sr.]: I'm glad it's you.

...

Nitti [on phone to Michael Sr]: I understand. But then Al wants your assurance that after that, it's over. The Lexington Hotel, room 1432.

...

Michael Jr [voiceover]: I saw then that my father's only fear was that his son would follow the same road. And that was the last time I ever held a gun. People always thought I grew up on a farm. And I guess, in a way, I did. But I lived a lifetime before that, in those six weeks on the road in the winter of 1931. When people ask me if Michael Sullivan was a good man, or if there was just no good in him at all, I always give the same answer. I just tell them...he was my father.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 13, 2014 11:14 pm

Not many terms of endearments were exchanged in my family. Not that I remember anyway. And every family has their own dynamic in this regard. Some have too many and some have too few. And when you have too many or too few that can lead to all manner of dysfunction. Or so the experts tell us. Too many and you have dependency issues, too few and, well, we know what that can lead to.

I wonder: Does it explain me, perhaps?

Here it's actually harder to pin down. The mother is no stranger to endearments but she is hopelessly neurotic. And her daughter will always have to deal with that. And then inflict it on her own family. Then it goes around and around in circles as everyone creates their own turbulent reactions. But it's always the kids that bear the brunt of it. At least until it's their turn to pass it all down the line.

Bottom line: Who we become is always embedded [either more or less] in our "inner child of the past". And there's only grasping this or not grasping this. The implications, for instance.

Of course that still doesn't explain Flap though. At times you look at Jeff Daniels playing him and you know why they picked him for the movie Dumb and Dumber. Ironically, he plays the bookish intellectual here. But there are all sorts of ways one can manage to become an...idiot. And even the most intelligent of men [and he is certainly not one of those] can be complete shits. If not all the time.

As for the rest of them, let's just say they are not at all the sort of folks that I would ever choose to hang around with. And vice versa. But that no doubt is my problem.

Anyway, terms of endearment become all the more problematic when, out of the blue, you receive a death sentence. From the doctor. And then the reactions become all the more turbulent when you are still relatively young. You find yourself dying and that changes everything. Especially when you have three young kids. You have to come up with things to say to them [and all the others] when there is nothing that can be said that will change anything.

IMDb

Debra Winger behaved erratically on the set of this film because she was trying to get over a severe cocaine addiction. At one point, she and Shirley MacLaine got into a shoving match.

James L. Brooks received a special gift at the end of production, to congratulate him for completing his first movie. This was a book of "Life in Hell" cartoons, drawn by Matt Groening. Brooks was so impressed with the comics that he asked Groening to create cartoon shorts for The Tracey Ullman Show (1987). This gave rise to The Simpsons.

Shirley MacLaine and Debra Winger were both nominated for 1983's Best Actress Oscar, which went to MacLaine. On her way to the podium, she reportedly whispered to Winger, "Half of this belongs to you," to which Winger reportedly replied, "I'll take half."


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terms_of_Endearment
trailer: http://youtu.be/zY0GM9KHU8o

TERMS OF ENDEARMENT [1983]
Written and directed by James L. Brooks

Aurora: Let me go, just for a minute.
Husband: You're going to stare that baby into a coma.
Aurora: Stop exaggerating.
Husband: It's not good to keep checking and imagining terrible things.
Aurora: I know, I know.
Husband: Here it starts. Here we go.
Aurora: Rudyard...Rudyard, she's not breathing.
Husband: Honey, she's sleeping. The baby's sleeping.
Aurora: No...Rudyard, it's crib death.
Husband: It's sleep! She's asleep, honey.
Aurora: Maybe.


Just sleep. But you can well imagine the future of this relationship.

Aurora: I'm totally convinced if you marry Flap Horton tomorrow, it will be a mistake of such gigantic proportions, it will ruin your life and make wretched your destiny.
Emma: Why are you doing this to me?
Aurora: You are not special enough to overcome a bad marriage. Emma, use your brains. Flap is limited. He hasn't got any imagination. Even at this age, all he wants is a secure teaching job.


Flap?

Emma: Mother... I'm marrying Flap Horton tomorrow. I thank God Flap's getting me out of here. If this is your attitude, don't even bother coming to my wedding.
Aurora: That's right. No, I think you're right. The hypocrisy was bothering me, too.

...

Emma: The only school that would accept his associate professorship is in Des Moines.
Aurora: He can't even do the simple things, like fail locally.

...

Garrett: Well, anyway, they cancelled the dinner, but I was really thinking about asking you out. Seriously. Ain't that a shocker?
Aurora: Yes. Imagine you having a date with someone where it wasn't necessarily a felony.

...

Emma: Don't yell, but I really think that I may be pregnant again.
Aurora: Oh! No! Oh, no! And you're going to have it, I suppose?
Emma: Yes, of course. What's happening to you, anyway?
Aurora: Don't act like that's so terrible. Bright young women are having simple abortions.
Emma: "Simple"?
Aurora: Then they get wonderful jobs. You can have it in Colorado.
Emma: I don't know why I tell you anything. I seem to like you less and less.
Aurora: You know why, Emma? Because I am the only person who tells you the truth. How will your life get better if you keep having children with that man? What miracle is going to come along to rescue you?

...

Sam: You're a very rude young woman. I know Douglas from the Rotary and I can't believe he'd want you treating customers so badly.
Checkout Girl: I don't think I was treating her badly.
Sam: Then you must be from New York.

...

Garrett: I think we're going to have to get drunk.
Aurora: I don't get drunk, and I don't care for escorts who do.
Garrett: You got me into this. You're just going to have to trust me about this one thing. You need a lot of drinks.
Aurora: To break the ice?
Garrett: To kill the bug that you have up your ass.

...

Aurora: Would you like to come in?
Garrett: I'd rather stick needles in my eyes.

...

Aurora: Everything would have been just fine, you know, if you hadn't gotten drunk. I was... I... I just didn't want you to think I was like one of your other girls.
Garrett: Not much danger in that unless you curtsy on my face real soon.
Aurora: Garrett! What is it that makes you so insistent on shocking and insulting me? I mean, I really hate that way of talking. You must know this. Why do you do it?
Garrett: I'll tell you, Aurora. I don't know what it is about you, but you do bring out the devil in me.

...

Aurora [looking at the homage to himself on Garrett's wall]: I'll tell you what. I think this is really sad, that you feel that you need all this stuff to impress girls with.
Garrett: Need it? Sometimes it isn't enough. There's nothing wrong with using your assets.
Aurora: I think it turns your profession into a sex trap.
Garrett: Oh, come on. Everybody uses whatever they have. I earned it! There are 106 astronauts in the whole fucking world and I'm one of them!

...

Doctor: You have a lump in your armpit. How long has it been there?
Emma: I don't know.
Doctor: There's two of them. It's not very big, though. I have to be out of town next week but you shouldn't wait. They should come out.
Emma: Come out? Should I be scared?
Doctor: If you're scared, you'll be happier when it turns out to be nothing.

...

Aurora: Rosie...our girl is in trouble. She has a cyst that's malignant. They're taking her to a hospital in Lincoln, Nebraska.


The Big One.

Dr. Maise: We do more and more on an outpatient basis. We shouldn't need to take her back, unless the illness escalates.
Aurora: But you're not telling me anything.
Dr. Maise: What are you confused about?
Aurora: How is she?
Dr. Maise: I always tell people to hope for the best and prepare for the worst.
Aurora: And they let you get away with that?

...

Aurora [to workmen hanging her paintings]: Careful there. Those are worth more than you'll ever make in your lifetime.
[they stare at her]
Emma [to the workmen]: I grew up with it my whole life. You can take it for a couple of minutes.

...

Aurora [to Garrett]: Who would ever have expected you to be a nice guy?

...

Aurora: Do you have any reaction at all to my telling you I love you?
Garrett: And I was just inches from a clean getaway.

...

Aurora: And you know what?
Emma: What?
Aurora: I got up the nerve to tell him I loved him. You know what his reaction was?
Emma: I don't give a shit, Mom, I'm sick.

...

Aurora: Flap...Patsy wants to raise Melanie and maybe the boys. I think they should be with me, don't you?
Flap: What can you be thinking about?
Aurora: Raising three children, working full time and chasing women requires a lot more energy than you have. You know, one of the nicest qualities about you is that you recognise your weaknesses. Don't lose that quality when you need it the most.
Flap: You have no right, nor any invitation, to discuss where or how my children live.


Maybe, but in the end though he gives them up.

Flap [to Emma]: I'm thinking about my identity, and not having one anymore. I mean, who am I, if I'm not the man who's failing Emma?
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 15, 2014 2:09 am

Horror films can be as much about the unknown as the supernatural. They probe into the dark recesses of the human psyche and the ghosts and the goblins might well be "metaphors" for all the stuff that most disturb us about [among other things] living and dying.

As noted at wiki:

[Pulse] is a philosophical exploration into the alienation and loneliness of modern existence due to technology. Communication breakdown and isolation are the main themes of the film.

After all, more and more some seem less and less inclined to live among others "in reality". Instead, they choose to interact in virtual worlds that proliferate "on line". They basically exist in an exchange of thoughts and feelings that they impart to characters [personas] they play in places like this. Or in Sim worlds. "Reality" then becomes more a frame of mind that they use to mold and maniplate others -- tugging and pulling them into their own narcissistic narratives [webs].

Who are they then? Other than who you think they are.

Imagine the internet here as a kind of purgatory.

One thing for sure: Be careful what you click "OK" for on the internet. And get yourself a good supply of red tape.

Anyway, few are better at exploring this sort of thing cinematically then the folks from the "far East". It's not for nothing that film critics point out over and again how "American remakes" of them are generally for shit. And this one is no exception. At RT, the 2001 original [from Japan] garnered a 73% fresh rating on 49 reviews. The 2006 American edition garnered a 10% fresh rating on 69 reviews.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulse_(2001_film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/EfoJpCSs2lU

PULSE [Kairo] 2001
Written and directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Junco: I don't know what Taguchi was depressed about. He never said anything, so what could we have done?
Yabi: Maybe he suddenly just wanted to die. I get that way sometimes. It's so easy to hang yourself.

...

Ryosuke [looking at the computer screen]: What's this?
Haure: That? Something we programed here. If two dots get too close, they die, but if they get too far apart, they're drawn together.
Ryosuke: What's it for?
Haure: A minature model of our world...but only the grad student who designed it understands it.
[he goes back to the screen]
Haure: I wouldn't suggest staring at it too long.

...

Haure: What got you started on the internet...wanted to connect with other people?
Ryosuke: Maybe...I don't know.
Haure: People don't really connect, you know. Like those dots simulating humans. We all live totally separately. Or that's how it seems to me.
...

Haure [staring at the computer dots]: Isn't it strange? Almost like ghosts. Sometimes these things turn up. At first, they look like the other dots.
Ryosuke: What are they?
Haure: I don't know.

...

Harue: I always wondered what it's like to die. From when I was really little I was always alone. I thought that after death you live happily with everyone over there. Then in high school it dawned on me you might be all alone after death, too.
Ryosuke: There's no way to know. How could you?
Harue: The idea was so terrifying. I couldn't even bear it. That nothing changes with death, just right now...forever.

...

Ryosuke: Nobody knows what happens when you die...But I do know that I am definitely alive and so are you, Harue. That's for sure. right? So I don't want to think about the fact that we'll die someday. Just maybe in 10 years, or at least while we're still alive they'll invent a drug that prevents death. Then, we could live forever and ever. Of course you might think I am crazy to say that, but I'd rather bet on that.
Harue: You want to live forever?
Ryosuke: Yes.
Harue: That sounds like fun?
Ryosuke: Yes, that's what I think.

...

Haure [to Ryosuke...but more to herself]: Ghosts won't kill people. Because that would just make more ghosts. Instead, they'll try to make people immortal. By quietly trapping them in their own loneliness.

...

Spectre [to Ryosuke]: Forever. Death is eternal loneliness. Forever.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 16, 2014 3:04 am

It's all about this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abscam

Of course to "hustle" has always had two meanings. Especially here in America. On the one hand, someone who hustles is often applauded for being in alignment with the American Dream. You make it here if you work hard, if you're willing to pay your dues, if you bend over backwards to make something of yourself. Everything is said to revolve around individual effort. So, if you are one of the winners you earned it; and, if you are one of the losers, you have no one to blame but yourself. Conservatives of course love this particular narrative.

Liberals, on the other hand, are often more in tune with the other meaning. This one: hustling as something that involves conning others, exploiting others, using others for your own personal gain and then dumping them along the side of the road [to riches] when you have used them up.

Anyway, the second meaning is something that folks from other countries often don't even have a translation for:

The American term "hustle" has no direct translation in many other languages. The studio approved the alternative titles American Bluff in France, American Dream in Israel, American Scandal in Argentina, American Sting in Portugal, and American Scam in Quebec. IMDb

In "reality" of course each point of view may or may not be relevant depending on the individual involved and the circumstances in which he finds himself. Or herself. There are just too many complex variables involved here. And always they are open to interpretation. And even then only to the extent that you understand them or are able to actually control them.

In other words, what a cluster fuck this 1] either turned out to be or 2] almost turned out to be.

On the other hand, these two [three? four? more?] were real slimeballs. You sort of have to be when the whole point of your business to is to prey on desparate people.

Of course "hustling" can be just as much personal as political and economic. All the games that are played on the suckers. But then we often find ourselves wondering: Am I the sucker? Oh, and never get emotionally involved with the mark. Not even if it's just male bonding.

IMDb

The film is a fictionalized telling of the Abscam (short for Arab scam) scandal of the late 1970s and early 1980s, an FBI operation that began as an investigation of trafficking in stolen property, but was later expanded to include political corruption.

The fight scene that takes place in the bedroom between Christian Bale and Jennifer Lawrence is completely improvised. A version of it had been written in the script, but the actors were struggling to connect with it, so director David O. Russell ultimately decided to allow them to say what they wanted.

According to Christian Bale much of the movie was improvised. So, during the shooting of the film he noted to David O. Russell, "You realize that this is going to change the plot greatly down track." To which the director replied, "Christian, I hate plots. I am all about characters, that's it."

Tied with Gangs of New York (2002) and True Grit (2010) for second-highest number of Academy Award nominations with no wins at 10, following The Turning Point (1977) and The Color Purple (1985) at 11.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Hustle
trailer: http://youtu.be/ST7a1aK_lG0

AMERICAN HUSTLE [2013]
Written in part and directed by David O. Russell

Title card: Some of this actually happened.

...

Irving [voiceover]: Did you ever have to find a way to survive and you knew your choices were bad, but you had to survive? I learned how to survive when I was a kid out on the streets. And I would rather be on the taking side then the getting taken side, any day of the week. Especially after I saw my father get taken. I mean, seeing that scarred me for life.

...

Irving: Is that Duke Ellington, on your bracelet?
Sydney: Yeah, as a matter of fact it is. He died this year, you know?
Irving: I know. I doubt anyone else here knows or cares about it.
Sydney: Well, I care about it. He saved my life many times.
Irving: Mine too. Which one?
Sydney: Jeep's Blues.
Irving: Jeep's Blues?
Sydney: Yeah. Jeep's Blues.
Irving: You wanna hear it?
Sydney: Right now?
Irving: Yeah.

...

Cosmo Interviewer: Our cover story right now is about cunnilingus. What do you think about that?
Sydney: I like it.

...

Irving [voiceover]: I felt like we had a secret. Just the two of us. You know, like that thing when you just wanna be with the one person all the time. And you feel like just the two of you understand that nobody else gets. I could just tell her everything about myself. And I never had anybody like that in my life before. It felt like, finally, I can truly be myself. Without being ashamed without being embarrassed.

...

Sydney [realizing Irving's angle]: Everybody at the bottom crosses paths eventually in a pool of desperation and you're waiting for them...
Irving: How about we?

...

Irving [voiceover]: As far as I can see people are always conning each other to get what they wanted. We even 'Con' ourselves. We talk ourselves into things, you know. We sell ourselves things whether we do need or want. You know, we are dressing 'em up. We leave out the risk. We leave out the ugly truth. Pay attention to that. Cos, we are always conning ourselves in one way or another. Just to get through life.

...

Rosalyn: We fight and then we fuck, that's our thing.
Irving [voiceover]: She was the Picasso of passive-aggressive karate. She was better than any con artist I ever met. Including myself. And she had me like nobody had me...I was her mark.

...

Richie [to Sydney]: I know you think - look at me, hey, Edith - I know you think Irv loves you. I know you think you know him. You think that he sees the world as this cold, dark place. He cares about nobody but a very few people on a short list: His son, his father, Rosalyn, and you. You think you're on the top of the list? What if you're not? What if you're not on that list? What if you're not even on that list at all? He'd be in here right now if he took the cheque, but no, you did. God, it's so clear to me, it's crazy, it's clear to me, but it's not clear to you. He uses you, Edith, to protect himself, to protect his son, and his wife in Long Island. No? Yes. He put a ring on her finger, he adopted her son. They have a huge house and they have two huge cars, what does she do all day? I'll tell you what she does: She plays with her nails, she watches TV, and she spends your money; the money that you make. I don't like that you're in jail while he's going free, I don't like any of that, I want to help you. All the razzle-dazzle that he does? It's not good, it's not real, it's fake, it's not real. Who you are is who you are, between you and God. You and your soul, that's what matters, that's what counts, that's what I'm about. That's what I see in you. Tell me you didn't feel it the first time we saw each other? Am I crazy? I don't think so.


Cons on one side of the law trying to con cons on the other side. Meanwhile the biggest cons are often perfectly legal in the United States of crony capitalism. Federal, state and local. And that's before we get to the Mob. And these guys go all the way back to Nucky Thompson. For all practical purposes.

Sydney: Rosalyn will never let you go. She used Danny against you. Because she's too messed up to let you leave.
Irving: I can't leave him. I love him, alright? He is my son.
Sydney: Richie said you will say that.
Irving: Richie? The cop?
Sydney: Yeah.
Irving: You're on a first name basis?
Sydney: Yes, I am. I am not even on your list, am i?
Irving: What list?
Sydney: Your list. Your short list...your long list. I'm not even on any of your fucking lists. I thought that you loved me.
Irving: I do love you.

...

Richie: How do you know the Sheikh?
Irving: Because he's my friend Al, from Queens.
Al "the Sheikh": I do aluminium siding and roofing.

...

Irving [in a museum]: I wanna show you something. This Rembrandt here, people come from all over the world to see this.
Richie: Yeah, he's good. Yeah.
Irving: It's a fake.
Richie: But, come on, it's impossible.
Irving: People believe what they wanna believe. The guy who made this was so good that it's real. To everybody. Now, who is the Master? The Painter..or the Forger?
Richie: That's a fake?
Irving: This is the way the world works. Not black and white like you say. Extremely grey.

...

Irving [voiceover]: The crazy thing about people: the more you say 'no' the more they want in on something. It is so stupid.

...

Irving [to Richie]: I'm like the fucking Vietcong, man, all right? I'm in and I'm out. I was there the whole time. You don't know it, all right? That's the fuckin' art of becoming somebody who people can pin their beliefs and their dreams on.

...

Richie: You playing me? You doing this... or are you playing him? It would be very bad for you if you're playing me.
Sydney: You're gonna have to decide for yourself, kid.

...

Irving: I believe that you should treat people the way that you want to be treated. Right? Didn't Jesus say that, or something?
Carmine: He may have.
Irving: Also, I think you should always take a favour, over money. I think Jesus said that as well.

...

Rosalyn [to Irving]: You wanna be more like Carmine? Why don't you build something, like he does? Instead of all your empty deals; they're just like your fuckin' science oven. You know, I read that it takes all of the nutrition out of our food! It's empty, just like your deals. Empty! Empty!

...

Sydney [to Irving]: You're nothing to me until you're everything.

...

Richie: You got any other questions?
Paco: Yeah, I think the name of this operation is offensive. What, Abscam? "Arab-scam"? It's racist!
Irving: Are you fucking kidding? What do you care? You're Mexican.

...

Irving [voiceover]: What are the fucking odds, you got an italian guy from Miami knowing Arabic. It turns out, he's got casino investments, in the middle east.

...

Sydney: What the hell do you think you're doing?
Rosalyn: What do I think I'm doing? What the fuck do you think you're doing? You're going to come in here and judge me for flirting with someone else when you've been fucking my husband for how many years?
Sydney: You don't have any fucking clue what's going on!
Rosalyn: I have a ring on my finger. We have a child together!
Sydney: He doesn't love you, Rosalyn. He loves me. And you know it, and I know it, and he knows it. And it might be done now, but it was beautiful, and it was real...
Rosalyn: Stop it.
Sydney: ...and we loved each other.
Rosalyn: Shut up.
Sydney: You scare him, and you manipulate him, and you use your son!
Rosalyn: Well, he must like it on some level. He must want it, because he keeps coming back for it. It's like that perfume that you love, that you can't stop smelling even when there's something sour in it. Can't get enough of it. Well guess what? He's never gonna leave me. He's always going to want me, and I will make you so sorry, Edith. I will make you so sorry for what you've done to my family. Mark my words!
Sydney: That is fucked up! I would never say anything that fucked up to anybody, but you do because you're gross inside. You're so fucked up and gross.
Rosalyn: Oh, I'm gross inside?
Sydney: Yeah!
Rosalyn: Maybe you're gross inside. What, robbing people and all that shit that you do? Maybe we're both gross inside. That's what Irving loves about us. At least he's consistent. You know, sometimes in life, all you have are fucked up, poisonous choices.
[She kisses Sydney and laughs]

But not for long.

[b]Richie: I love you. It is real now. I just..I just said it. So, now is the time. Look at me, look at me. I love you. I love you. I just said that.
Sydney: Do you want the truth? Do you want real?
Richie: I'm ready for real.
Sydney: This is real. Do you hear my voice? This is real. This is real. I want you to hear what's real.
Richie [startled by her change of accent]: What?
Sydnay: This is me.
Richie: What do you mean? Well, you're doing an accent? Your american accent?
Sydney: No, there is no English. There's only American. There's no English.
RIchie: What are you talking about? Stop it, you're Edith. Your birth records say..
Sydney: I falsified my records back to birth. I falsified them. My name is Sydney Prosser. I am from Albuqurque, New Mexico. I'm not Edith Greensly. There is no Edith Greensly.
Richie: You're....freaking.....me....out.

...

Rosalyn: Life is ridiculous. And you know that I would never say anything bad about your father in front of you, but your father is a sick son-of-a bitch.
Danny: Daddy's a sick son-of-a-bitch?
Rosalyn: Don't repeat that...but yes.

...

Carmine: Irving...look, I'm a good person.
Irving: You are a good person.
Carmine: I've been doing this for a long time. For twenty years! Do you think I would've taken that money. If it wasn't the right thing to do?
Irving: You're a good person. I know that, but in all honesty...
Carmine: You said that was the only way Irv. You chased me, you remember?
Irving: They fucking made me do it. I was asked to do that or go to jail.
Carmine: You made me go back to the plaza, To take that money. You piece of shit! I was gone! You fucking prick! You motherfucker!!! You fucking chased me, you piece of shit! I was gone! I left!!

...

Sydney: People believe what they wanna believe, Richie.
Richie: No, because you conned me. That's why. Because you fucking conned me. You did.
Irving: That...that doesn't sound so good either. You know what I mean. But, let's just assume you wanna go with that story. Really? That's the story, you wanna go with? That's what you want the New York Times to hear. That you got conned by the very con men who you forced to entrap the members of congress in the first place. That's what you wanna go with? That doesn't sound so good for your whole thing does it? How ironic...that the ones who're working hardest to get the economy of New Jersey's going...those are the ones you round up. Why? Because they are the easiest to go after? What about the real bullshit artists? You didn't even come close to the big leagues. Those big guys. The money men.
Richie: That's what I was trying to go after.
Irving: Well I'm sorry to telling you, you got none of 'em.

...

Irving [voiceover]: We took down some very big guys. Some of whom, they were just doing business as usual, helping their communities or their states, but some of them knew they had larceny in their blood, and they even admitted it. But in all, it was six congressmen, one United States senator, and my friend Carmine Polito. We gave the two million back, so that Carmine got a reduced sentence, 18 months. The loss of his friendship would haunt me the rest of my life. When the story was written, Richie DiMaso's name was never mentioned. Syd and I, we moved in together. Rosalyn? She would always be interesting. Our conning days were behind us. You can fool yourself for just so long, that your next reinvention you better have your damn feet on the ground. We got a loan from a bank and were able to go gallery-legitimate. The art of survival, is a story that never ends.


Next up: Jeep's Blues: http://youtu.be/uUcEGOLfUTE
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 17, 2014 10:52 pm

Here is a hetereosexual male playing a homosexual male exposing all of the homophobic foibles of heterosexual men and women in America. What could possibly go wrong? Let's ask Ron Paul.

And how in the world could...would...should one react to it without pissing at least some folks off?

Bottom line: Ask yourself: Is this funnier than it is inanely stupid? And can this possibly be known for sure?

It's especially funny if you like to see folks being made complete fools of. Sure, it sounds cruel but you almost always think that these folks are complete fools -- so that makes it okay. Well, if your politics are liberal and progressive.

On the other hand, sometimes he goes too far and things get downright...crude. Repulsive even. If only from a particular point of view. Even mine from time to time.

It is alleged that, aside from the skit with Harrison Ford, all of these encounters are supposed to actually be nonscripted. Maybe. But I don't believe it. Paula Abdul sitting on the Mexican? The focus group? The interview with Ayman Abu Aita? The Dallas talk show? The extreme fighting bit?

On the other hand, the "interview" with Ron Paul seemed utterly genuine. The Libertarian bigot? Let's ask his son, Rand.

IMDb

According to Sacha Baron Cohen, Harrison Ford is in the only scene that was scripted, and was the only actor that was in on the joke.

In October 2006, entertainment blog website Defamer.com jokingly reported the title would be "Bruno: Delicious Journeys Through America for the Purpose of Making Heterosexual Males Visibly Uncomfortable in the Presence of a Gay Foreigner in a Mesh T-Shirt". Numerous websites around the world - including IMDb - reported this to be the actual working title

The sequence where Bruno enrolled at the Alabama National Guard, filmed at the Alabama Military Academy in Fort McClellan, Anniston, went undetected until a young cadet who recognized him from Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006), notified elder officers who were unfamiliar with the actor.


Nope. Doesn't ring true at all to me.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Br%C3%BCno
trailer: http://youtu.be/hfSu9zqRZH0

BRUNO [2009]
Directed by Larry Charles

Bruno: Modelling, a lot of people think it's easy. But it's the hardest job in the world, isn't it?
Heather Hahn [supermodel]: It's very hard. Standing in heels all day, and everyone's watching you, so you have to make sure your walk is good.
Bruno: Yeah, it's really hard, 'cause you've gotta remember, like, to put your right leg forward and then put your left leg forward and then, like, which one now? Right leg again, and then, like, the left one. And then sometimes you even have to turn.
Heather: Yeah. And especially the turn. It's so scary.

...

Bruno: In September 2008, I left for Milan Fashion Week to shoot a new season of Funkyzeit. Brüno had backstage access for the hottest show of the week, de la Prada. So I wore the jewel of mein wardrobe, a suit made entirely out of Velcro.


So, which is more hilarious: Bruno in the Velcro suit or the fashion show itself:

Bruno [voiceover]:I realized that night that the fashion world was superficial and vacuous. So, I decided instead to go to Los Angeles to become a celebrity. I was going to be the biggest Austrian superstar since Hitler.

...

[at the Pink Cheeks anal bleaching salon]
Bruno: You were actually my second choice. I was going to go to the salon that maintains Salma Hayek's inner thighs, but the team that do it were booked up for the next four days because she's got the Elle Style Awards. And they said they're, like, really, really exhausted after they do her.
Lady: They're exhausted after they wax Salma Hayek? She must have a lot of hair.
Bruno: They say that after a waxing, there's enough to stuff a mattress.

...

Bruno [pointing to a photograph of Mel Gibson]: The Fuhrer?

...

Focus group advisor [after the focus group views Bruno's video for a TV show]: So if you could describe this show in one sentence...Can anybody give me one sentence? Go ahead.
Focus gourp member: The worst piece of crap I have ever seen.
Focus gourp member: What sick human being came up with something like this?
Focus gourp member: I wanted to poke my eyes out with hot needles.
Focus gourp member: You'd have to bnorrow the needles from me.
Focus gourp member: No logical person would consider a show like this unless they had some sort of a mental or moral defect.
Focus gourp member: It was worse than cancer.
Focus gourp member: The only way this guy will ever be famous is in a sex tape.

...

Ron Paul [after Bruno strips to his underwear]: All right! Get out of here! This has ended.
Bruno: What's going on?
Ron Paul [to his aide]: That guy is queerer than the blazes. He took his clothes off. Let's get going.
Aide: What happened?
Ron Paul: He's queer. He's crazy. He put a hit on me. He took his clothes off!!

...

[At Nicole and Suzanne Defosset's Charity PR office]
Nicole: Global warming's only getting worse. So...Now, I think that would be... That's something to get involved now, so, we can just help ease the... Like, after us, in order to help for our future. In order for everyone...It's just a beneficial thing to be involved with now.
Bruno: I'm really into doing something maybe for Africa. Is that still cool or...
Suzanne: Saving some kind of extinct animal? What's going extinct right now?
Bruno: I don't know, like elephants or something?

...

Bruno: What's the coolest type of charity to get into at the moment?
Nicole: Save Darfur.
Bruno: Save what?
Suzanne: Save Darfur. Angelina Jolie.
Bruno: Is that in, like, Iraqi or something like that?
Nicole: Yeah, that's in the... It's in... Yeah. Yeah.
Bruno: Is there anywhere in the world that no celebrity has tried to fix? Darfur is the big one now. What's the new one? What's Dar-five?

...

Brüno [voiceover]: I was going to become famous by solving a world problem! But which one? Clooney's got Darfur, Sting's got the Amazon, and Bono's got AIDS! Luckily, there was still one shithole left to fix: the Middle Earth.


He means the Middle East of course.

Bruno: I'll be honest with you. I want to be famous. And I want the best guys in the business to kidnap me. Al-Qaeda is so 2001.
Ayman Abu Aita: I don't like.

...

Bruno: Can I give you guys a word of advice? Lose the beards, because your King Osama looks like a kind of dirty wizard or a homeless Santa.
Ayman Abu Aita: What did he say?
[the translator translates and Ayman Abu Aita reacts]
Translator [to Bruno]: Get out! Get out now!
Bruno [voiceover]: I was encouraged to leave the Middle Earth.

...

Bruno [at the airport lifting a black infant out of a cardboard box on the luggage carousel]: Madonna has one. Brangalina has one. And now Bruno has one.

...

[Bruno interviews parents who want their children in the movies]

Bruno: Would you be ready for your baby to be strung up on a crucifix next to mine?
Parent: Fine. Yeah, I don't mind her being up on a crucifix. Sure.

...

Bruno: Is your baby comfortable with bees, wasps and hornets?
Parent: George is comfortable with everything. He's fine.

...

Bruno: Is he comfortable with dead or dying animals?
Parent: Yes.
Bruno: Great.

...

Bruno: Amateur science.
Parent: What do you mean by that?
Bruno: You know, some untrained people conducting scientific experiments.
Parent: Should be fine.
Bruno: You know, her mixing the pots of acid and that type...
Parent: Okay.
Bruno: And so it's a yes.
Parent: Yes.

...

Bruno: Is your baby fine with antiquated heavy machinery?
Parent: Yeah, she's fine. She's been around that.
Bruno: Would she be fine to operate them?
Parent: Yes.

...

Bruno: Is your baby fine with lit phosphorus?
Parent: Yes.
Bruno: Excellent. Does he like it?
Parent: Loves it.

...

Bruno: A little sensitive subject here. How much does she weigh?
Parent: She's about 30 pounds.
Bruno: Thirty pounds. Can she lose 10 pounds in the next week?
Parent: In the next week, seven days. I'd have to do whatever I could.
Bruno: If there's a problem losing the weight, would you be ready to have her undergo liposuction?
Parent: If that was a last resort and she didn't lose the few pounds, then, yeah, we'd have to do that.
Bruno: Great. Fantastic news. We have chosen your baby to be dressed as a Nazi officer pushing a wheelbarrow with another baby as a Jew in it into an oven.
Parent: Into an oven?
Bruno: Congratulations. How do you feel?
Parent: Great, if she got the job.

...

Brüno [on talk show]: There's a lot of African Americans in Africa!
African-American Lady: No! There's a lot of Africans in Africa!
Brüno: That's racist!

...

TV Host Bey: All right, but wait a second. You are the baby's father now. And you chose to dress that baby up in a T-shirt that says what?
Bruno: Gayby.
Bey: That's not the baby's name, is it?
Brüno: No, I gave him a traditional African name.
Bey: So what's that?
Bruno: O.J.

...

Bruno: Things have got to change. I want to become straight.
Pastor Jody Trautwein: Awesome.
Bruno: Once I'm straight, can I still play the clarinet?
Pastor Jody Trautwein: If it doesn't remind you about some of the behaviour that you engaged in when you put your lips around it. If it doesn't remind you of that, then I say go for it and play the clarinet with everything inside of you. If it does remind you of that, then I say put it down, give it away, let a friend hold it until you know in your mind you're ready to pick it up again and it wouldn't remind you of that.

...

Brüno: So you were never gay?
Pastor Jody Trautwein: [shakes head] Mh-mh.
Brüno: It's ironic that you should have amazing blowjob lips.
Pastor Jody Trautwein: These...these lips were made to praise Jesus.

...

Drill Sergeant: Your finger's in my alley.
Brüno: Not yet.

...

Brüno: Look at the four of us; we are so like the Sex in the City girls!
Donny [the hunter]: Oh no, we aren't either!
Brüno: Which one are you, Donny?
Donny: I ain't any one of them, I'm Donny.
Brüno: That is such a Samantha thing to say!

...

Brüno [to the hunters]: I wouldn't want to wake up in the morning and find that I'm torn in my arschenholer.

...

Brüno: Look me in the eye.
Angry Swinger: This is a fuckin' swingers' party. OK? If you don't want pussy, if you don't want fuckin'... then quit fuckin' touching me and quit looking at me. I definitely ain't lookin' at you in the eye. OK? I didn't come here for no fuckin' queer shit, OK? I know what you're doin'.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 18, 2014 11:07 pm

The Cube. Is it just another metaphor for existence itself: I never asked to be here but now that I am what the fuck does it all mean? Either that or being "imprisoned": In "what exactly?"

As for all the folks in here with me -- why do they have to think and feel the way they do, and not the way I do. And what happens when we do get out? Are we really better off out instead of in?

And then, in any event, what is the right "attitude" to take about however we construe the situation to be?

And the existential element: you never quite know what is around the corner. Or, here, in the next room.

And [as always] that tricky relationship between whatever reality might actually be and whatever it is that we think [believe] that it might actually be.

You know, like in here.

Only in the cube one of them was actually in on its creation. Though not in the sense that they invented it or designed it. In other words, not in the sense that God designed or invented human existence. Everyone it seems is only so far up or so far down the food chain.

Summed up best perhaps this way:

Quentin: Why put people in it?
Worth: Because it's here. You have to use it, or you admit it's pointless.
Quentin: But it, it is pointless.
Worth: Quentin...that's my point.


Look for the nihilist. And [of course] prime numbers.

IMDb

Not only are the characters named after prisons but they reflect the prisons themselves. Example: Kazan (the mentally challenged character), in Russia is a disorganized prison. Rennes (the "mentor") was a jail that pioneered many of today's prison policies. Quentin (the detective) is known for its brutality. Holloway is a women's prison, and Alderson is a prison where isolation is a common punishment. Leavenworth runs to a rigid set of rules (Leaven's mathematics), and the new prison is corporately owned and built (Worth, hired as an architect).

Director Vincenzo Natali directed a follow-up short film in which we see what is outside the cube. Natali has made a solemn vow never to reveal what was outside the cube, and destroyed the video years ago.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cube_(film)
trailer http://youtu.be/MY5PkidV1cM

CUBE [1997]
Written in part and directed by Vincenzo Natali

Quentin: How many people are in this thing?

...

Quentin: Listen, we can't go climbing around in here.
Holloway: Why not?
Quentin: There's traps.
Holloway: What do you mean traps?
Quentin: Booby traps. I looked in the room down there, and something almost cut my head off.

...

Quentin: Does anybody remember how they got here?

...

Holloway: It's like Chile. They always come in the middle of the night.
Quentin: Who?
Holloway: Only the goverment could build something this ugly.
Quentin: It ain't government.
Holloway: Then what is it?
Quentin: I don't know.
Holloway: Aliens.

...

Holloway: We have about 3 days without food and water before we are too weak to move.
Leaven: Well, they have to feed us, don't they?

...

Holloway: Why would they throw innocent people in here? Are we being punished?
Leaven: I've never done anything to deserve this.
Quentin: Forget about all that! You can't see the big picture from in here, so don't try.


Sound familiar?

Quentin: Let's start with us. We got an escape artist and a cop. There's gotta be a reason for that. You're a doctor, Holloway. That gives you a function, a reason, right?
Holloway: No! It just makes me go, "Why me and not one of the other ten million doctors out there?"

...

Holloway: I think we have to ask the big questions! What does "it" want? What is "it" thinking?
Worth: "One down, four to go."

...

Quentin: Why don't you tell us what your purpose is, Worth?
Worth: Often wondered that myself. I'm just a guy, I work in an office building doing office building stuff. I wasn't exactly bursting with joie de vivre before I got here, life just sucks in general.
Holloway: Oh I can't stand that attitude.
Leaven: 'Cos he's right.


Spotted the nihilist yet?

Leaven [looking at the "room numbers"]: Prime numbers! I can't believe I didn't see it before!

...

Quentin: Somebody has to take responsibility around here.
Worth: And that somebody has to be you?
Quentin: Not all of us have the luxury of playing nihilist.
Worth: Not all of us are conceited enough to play hero.
Quentin [growing increasingly angry]: This is a will to live. Everybody's got it, Worth, even you. Especially you! Hiding behind that cynical front.
Worth: A will to live. That's the warm, cozy feeling deep inside? Thanks, Quentin, I'm a new man.
Quentin: Oh. Poor Worth. Nobody loves me. If that's the chip on your shoulder, why did you lug it all this way? Why didn't you just lie down and die?

...

Worth: You think we matter? We don't.
Quentin: Put us out of your misery so we can get on with getting out of here!
Worth: Oh, you're not getting out of here.
Quentin: Yes, we are.
Worth: No, you're not.
Quentin: Yes, we are!
Worth [shouting furiously] There is no way out of here!
Quentin [suddenly realizing Worth knows more than he's telling them]: Gotcha.
Holloway [shocked]: How do you know that?
Quentin: Answer the question, Worth.
Holloway: Oh, God.
Quentin: Who are you?
Worth: I'm the poison. I designed the outer shell.

...

Holloway [speculating on what is behind Worth's "sarcophagus"]: It's all the same machine, right? The Pentagon, multinational corporations, the police. If you do one little job, you build a widget in Saskatoon, and the next thing you know, it's two miles under the desert, the essential component of a death machine. I was right! All along, my whole life, I knew it! I told you, Quentin. Nobody's ever going to call me paranoid again! We've gotta get out of here and blow the lid off this thing!
Worth: Holloway, you don't get it.
Holloway: Then help me, please. I need to know!
Worth: This may be hard for you to understand, but there is no conspiracy. Nobody is in charge. It, it's a headless blunder operating under the illusion of a master plan. Can you grasp that? Big Brother is not watching you.
Holloway: What kind of fuckin' explanation is that?
Worth: It's the best you are gonna get. I looked, and the only conclusion I could come to is that there is nobody up there.
Quentin: Somebody had to say yes to this thing.
Worth: What thing? Only we know what it is.


Me, I'm backing Holloway.

Worth: I mean, somebody might have known sometime before they were gone, they got fired, or voted out, or sold it, but if this place ever had a purpose, it got miscommunicated, or lost in a shuffle. I mean, this is an accident, a forgotten perpetual public works project. Do you think anybody wants to ask questions? All they want is a clear conscience, and a fat paycheck.

...

Quentin: But why put people in it?
Worth: Because it's here. You have to use it, or you admit it's pointless.
Quentin: But it, it is pointless.
Worth: Quentin... that's my point.
Holloway: What have we come to? It's so much worse than I thought.
Worth: Not really. Just more pathetic.

...

Worth: We're both part of the same system. I drew a box, you walk a beat. It's like you said, Quentin, is keep your head down, keep it simple, just look at what's in front of you. I mean, nobody wants to see the big picture. Life's too complicated. I mean, let's face it, the reason we're here is that it's out of control.

...

Leaven: Ok. The biggest the cube can be then is...26 rooms high, 26 rooms across, so...17,576 rooms.
Holloway: Seventeen thousand, five hundred and seventy-six rooms?!
Leaven [thinking]: Descartes! Cartesian coordinates. Of course, coded cartesian coordinates. They're used in geometry to plot points on a dimensional graph. These numbers are markers, and grid reference, like latitude and longitude on a map. The numbers tell us where we are inside the cube.

...

Quentin [after deliberately letting go of Holloway]: She....slipped...

...

Worth: Hey! Listen to what I'm saying. There was a room there before. We haven't been moving in circles, the rooms have.

...

Leaven: This room moves to 0, 1, and -1 on the X-axis, 2, 5, and -7 on the Y and 1, -1, and 0 on zed.

...

Leaven: At first, I thought that they were identified by prime numbers, but they are not. They are identified by numbers that are the power of a prime.
Worth: Can you calculate that?
Leaven: The numbers are huge. Maybe if I had a computer.
Quentin: You don't need a computer.
Leaven: Yes I do.
Quentin: Figure it out! I'm not dying in a fucking rat maze!
Leaven: Look. Nobody in the whole world could do it mentally. Look at the numbers...567, 898, 545 There's no way I can factor that! I can't even start on 567! It's astronomical!


Enter Kazan: the autistic-savant.

Leaven: So, guess what? This is the room we started in. I was right. We should never have moved in the first place.
Worth: The bridge...

...

Leaven [reaching the exit of the cube]: What are you doing? You can't quit now. It's not your fault!
Worth: I have nothing to live for out there.
Leaven: What is out there?
Worth: Boundless human stupidity.
Leaven: I can live with that.


But only one makes it out alive. And it's not her.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 20, 2014 2:23 am

Think Cube with a bigger budget. So, sure, it seems more sophisticated. More CGI stuff for example. But it's not nearly as good as the first one because that is basically where all the new bucks go: making it look better. The cube is now a tesseract. And a tesseract is said to be to a cube what a cube is to a square: it adds another dimension.

But that can then introduce an element of "reality" that increasingly becomes just sheer speculation. Fun but the foundation is often considerably less stable. It can also make interactions between the folks in the cube [and between the folks in the cube and the cube itself] become considerably more, say, hyperbolic.

Alas, what they should have spent the additional bucks on is the script. Gone [bascially] are the provocative characters asking provocative questions.

It seems that the first cube had rules. A gigantic puzzle. Like a Rubik's Cube. But it revolved around numbers. Decode them and there was a chance to get out. No numbers here though. Well, one. But significantly less intriguing. And it was as though the inside of the Rubik's Cube was suddenly surging up to the surface...crushing everything in its path. Think multiverse and quantum interaction here. Though no mention of Rational Metaphysics or Affectance Ontology.

What is the "meaning" of it all? What lies "behind" the cube? ? Here is one take on it: http://horrornews.net/58894/the-cube-mo ... franchise/

There is also a third movie in this franchise. But it is the prequel. I have it somewhere in my collection but haven't gotten to it yet.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cube_2:_Hypercube
trailer: http://youtu.be/JSFP2a7g7Js

CUBE 2: HYPERCUBE [2002]
Directed by Andrzej Sekula

Maguire: Numbers. Where's the goddamn numbers?
[the portal closes before he can decide what to do]
Maguire: Oh God, oh God. There has to be something.
[he opens a briefcase, but it does not contain whatever he was looking for]
Maguire: Oh, goddamn it! I mean, they're my numbers! Don't I at least get a shot at my numbers, you stupid fucks? I want a chance! I want a chance, like everyone else!

...

Kate: This is Sasha. She's blind. And she's very scared.
Jerry: What a bummer, to be blind in this place.

...

Kate: What are you doing?
Jerry: I'm marking the rooms.
Kate: This is the fourth room you've been in?
Jerry: Yeah.
Kate: I thought you said you've been wandering these rooms for hours.
Jerry: Yeah. That's the weird thing isn't it? Each one of these rooms has six of these doors and portals, but no matter how many different doors and portals I go through I always end up in the same three rooms. Until now.
Kate: It's as if the rooms were moving around...or something.

...

Jerry: How do you do, Mrs. Paley?
Mrs. Paley: Hello.
Jerry: You don't happen to know why you're here, do you?
Mrs. Paley: Oh, dear, I was never very good at philosophy.

...

Sasha: It's getting closer.
Kate: Sasha, do you know what "it" is?
Sash: No, not really. But I can hear it. All the time, even when you don't. And it sounds...it feels wrong.
Mrs. Paley: Maybe we're in Hell.

...

Jerry: I designed the door panels in here. The touch sensors. I was freelancing for a subcontractor, I...
Kate: You didn't think this was worth mentioning before?
Jerry: I signed a confidentiality--
Simon: Well, given our current situation, I'd say it's null and void. What the hell is this place?
Jerry: I don't know. Look, you don't think the guy that makes the toilets in the space shuttle, gets to see the plans for the rest of it?
Simon: You must have had some idea what they were building.
Jerry: It was experimental. It was a prototype.
Simon: For what?
Jerry: I'm not sure. Leading-edge stuff. There were rumors...
Simon: What kind of rumors, Jerry? What rumors?
Jerry: Quantum teleportation.
Max: You mean, like...'Beam me up, Scotty'?

...

Jerry: Let's call one dimension, length, and represent that with a simple line. Now, two dimensions are length and width, which can be represented by a single square.
Now if we extend that square, one more dimension we get a cube, which has three dimensions. Length, width, and depth. If you take this cube, and extend it one more dimension we get a tesseract.
Rex: I thought time was considered to be the fourth dimension.
Jerry: Sure. That's one idea. But what if you have a fourth spatial dimension?
Kate: Let's just say that we are in this hypercube...that it is is real -- does this diagram show us how to get out?
Jerry: Well, uh...no. A hypercube isn't supposed to be real. It's just a theoretical construct.
Simon: Well, is there a theory on how we might get out of this theoretical construct?

...

Jerry: 60,659 rooms?
Kate: This place must be huge.
Mrs. Paley: Oh yes. In a hypercube there can be 60 million rooms.

...

Kate: Is it possible that you worked for Izon Research Affiliates and your dog's name is Skippy?
Mrs. Paley: How did you know where I worked?
Kate: Oh, God. She worked for a weapons manufacturer.


See, I told you Holloway was closer to the truth above.

Mrs. Paley: Some things should never be created. They exist for theoretical purposes only. It would never last.

...

Jerry: I know what just happened there was a little shocking, but it actually makes total sense if we're in a really multi-dimensional quantum environment. One fundamental idea of a quantum universe, is that parallel realities can actually exist simultaneously.
Simon: How do you know that, Jerry? All you designed were the door panels!
Jerry: I read it in Rosenzweig book, it was a big part of his theory. What if whoever designed this stinking thing somehow managed to create a place where parallel realities can crossover like that?
Kate: So what you are saying is that we just saw Simon and Mrs. Paley in a parallel universe?
Jerry: Yes! Yes!

...

Simon: Don't open it, Max! Say Jerry's right. I think all of this is a hoax, okay? I think Jerry's either full of shit or part of this experiment. But I'm agreeing with you, Max. I think we're all pumped so full of LSD and I think we're hidden in some CIA hospital in Area 51...or whatever. But let's just say, on the off-chance that Jerry is actually right. Then what happens if whatever the fuck it was in there that killed the guy, killed me, what happens if that fucking thing gets in here?!

...

Mrs. Paley: It's stunning. The math of it. It's a perfect quadrangular oscillation.


But then it starts...darting about.

Sasha: It is hopeless.
Kate: No, it's not. I'm gonna figure this out.
Sasha: 'Figure it out.' Trust me, precious, if I haven't figured it out, you sure as shit aren't going to.
Kate: What did you just say?
Sasha: I'm sorry, Kate. I didn't mean to--
Kate: Why do you think that you should be able to figure this out?
Sasha: I wasn't kidnapped. When I found out they were putting people in here, I tried to blow the whistle on them. So they came after me. I escaped into the one place they wouldn't dare follow me--in here. Poetic justice, don't you think?
Kate: Who are you?
Sasha: Max was right. Jerry was wrong. I exist.
Kate: Oh my God. Sasha. Of course.
Sasha: Sasha is the nickname for Alexandra.
Kate and Sasha together: Alex Trusk.

...

Simon: You gotta love these parallel universes.

...

Kate: It's Jerry's diagram. It's all the numbers. They're all just suddenly in here. It's Jerry's markings--that dead physicist's equations-- and that damn colonel's corpse, just hanging there as ifwe never even rescued him? Everything keeps appearing over and over again.


Get it?

Kate: Who are you?
Simon: Yeah, it's me. Good old Simon. Do you remember this, do you? Well, I've waited a long time for payback.
Kate: But, that was just seconds ago.
Simon: Don't be so stupid Kate. You know time works differently in this place.

,,,

The Man: Hello, Kate. Welcome back. So, you figured it out.
Kate: Yes, sir. No time to spare.
The Man: The device--any luck?
[Kate says nothing]
The Man [referring to a small, clear plastic box with an object inside]: We'll take that to Darcy and see if anything recorded on it.
[a soldier shots Kate in the head...a phone rings...The Man answers it]
The Man: Sir? Yes, sir. Phase two is terminated. I see. Yes, sir. Right away, sir.


Wow. A very mysterious ending. Completely unintelligible for example.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 21, 2014 12:57 am

When it comes to gangs, Johannesburg is considered to be one of the most dangerous cities on earth: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/1919382.stm

This film is "inspired by real events". That seems particularly tricky when trying to decide just how true it is. But one thing seems reasonably clear: there are gangsters...and then there are gangsters. These gangs literally take over entire buildings.

Or you might ask yourself this: Was Robin Hood a gangster? Or is such a comparison simply preposterous?

Crime does pay. Or it sure does for some. And in the ghetto it is [for all practical purposes] the only way to pursue an "empire" without, say, a college degree...or an inheritance.

But here the man [Lucky Kuene] is wanted by both the law and the lawless. He is a hero to some...and a steaming pile of shit to others. His philosophy of life revolves around this:

Lucky [voiceover]: I have two heroes, Karl Marx and Al Capone. Al Capone said, "If you're gonna steal, steal big and hope like hell you get away with it." And Karl Marx said, "All property is theft." I think they'd both be proud of me.

The film begins with his arrest. And then in the interrogation room he "takes us back to the beginning": to the end of apartheid in South Africa. Back to a time he once had a dream...

Good luck trying to make up your mind about him. About what he does. About those trying to stop him. It all gets entangled up in black and white, in rich and poor. In before and after.

And then the simply surreal relationship with Leah. Her parents are rich white Jews and she knows nothing about what Lucky really does for a living.

IMDb

A mixture of languages can be heard throughout the movie. Much of what the main characters speak to each other is township slang known as Tsotsitaal (literally 'gangster language') which is composed of vocabulary from Zulu, Sotho, Afrikaans, English, other African languages and invented slang. It is generally associated with young township-dwelling men, though some terms have entered mainstream South African parlance.

Writer-director Ralph Ziman learned how a gang had stolen a whole building in Hillbrow in Johannesburg through coercion. He began researching the phenomenon by interviewing reporters, police officers, social workers and lawyers, only to discover that the practice is highly commonplace in South Africa.

The title comes from the idea that when you look at the district of Hillbrow from a distance, it stands proudly on a hill, like a New Jerusalem.

The budget was so low on the film that old cameras were used as were skateboards in place of dollies. The budget was considerably less than many of the music videos that Ralph Ziman had directed.


Interview with the writer/director
http://www.scriptmag.com/features/gangs ... alph-ziman

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangster's ... Jerusalema
trailer: http://youtu.be/0d5KdM4tzvI

GANGSTER'S PARADISE [JERUSALEMA] 2008
Written and directed by Ralph Ziman

[Lucky is interviewed about his life]
Interviewer [in interrogation room]: I want the real story this time. Take me back to the beginning.
Lucky: The beginning. Soweto. 1994. Freedom. The new South Africa. A new dawn. A new day. A fresh start. A clean page. A new beginning...

...

Nazareth: We're in the procurment industry.
Zakes: He is a carjacker.
Nazareth: Hijack is a dirty word. It's called "affirmative repossession".
Lucky: Aw, come on man, we didn't fight the struggle so that we could become criminals.
Nazareth: And I didn't fight apartheid to be poor either. I may be a Communist, but I believe that God helps those who help themselves.


See how rationalization works?

Lucky [voiceover]: When financial aid for the university proved problematic, Nazareth organized us an "apprenticeship" He also put us in touch with a business associate...
[cut to a shot of dozens of guns and rifles]
Lucky: ....to procure the necessary supplies.


He tried to go to college first. The university accepted his application. But his family could not afford to send him.

Nazareth [to Lucky and Zakes after watching the armored car heist from Heat]: Boys, I have a job for you...

...

Lucky [voiceover]: If Hollywood movies could teach you how to knock over amorored cars, bank robberies were a walk in the park.


But then...

Lucky [voiceover]: We were having too many close calls. Cops, frustrated by rising crime rates and a legal system that couldn't keep those arrested behind bars, took the law into their own hands.

...

Nazareth: I hear you are reapplying to the university.
[Lucky nods]
Nazareth: What are you going to eat, books? You can't quit from crime. Crime is the biggest growth industry in the country.
Lucky: Correction, Comrade Nazareth. Private security is. Last year it surpassed mining.

...

Lucky [voiceover]: Nomsa had dropped out of Jo'burg Tech and followed me to Hillbrow to attend the university of life. She'd found work as a bank teller...and a way to make it pay. She learned what we all knew. If you want to get by, take a job where there is something to steal.


And her scam is a beaut. But it's nothing compared to Lucky's.

Lucky [voiceover]: Johannesburg. A city fathered by gold, mothered by money, then commandeered by white men with cruelty and greed. Al Capone said you can go a long way with a smile. But you can go much further still with a smile and a gun. But if I was going to graduate from this shithole to my beach house, it would take a gun in one hand, and a briefcase in the other. And my best shit-eating grin.

Welcome to the birthday of the Hillbrow People's Housing Trust. With Lucky Kuene as Robin Hood.

Lucky: What if he goes to the police?
Lucas: This is purely a civil matter. There's no such thing as theft of fixed assets. The police can't do anything about it unless the owner gets a court order. And that will take him around a year or more.
Lucky: And all the time we are collecting rent....

...

Santos Roibiero [the rich white slumlord that Lucky is shafting]: This is the only country in the world where you have to take shit in 11 official languages.

...

Lucky [voiceover]: We were taking back the streets one building after another after another. I looked around and what I saw was an empire waiting to happen.

...

Lucky: What's with you white people? You have nice houses, smart cars, fancy clothes and you still come here. Why?
Leah: I guess when you're rich, poverty seems glamorous. It's got a certain charm.

...

Lucky: Look at them coming and going from church. Hillbrow is like the new Jerulsalem.
Leah: It's more like Sodom and Gomorrah.
Lucky: How can you say that?
Leah: Hillbrow is the crime capital of the world.
Lucky: It's just a place where poor black people come to make a living.
Leah: Don't play the race card with me.
Lucky [laughing]: Old habits die hard. You'd be surprised how effective it can be.

...

Swart [a white cop who is out to bring Lucky down]: You know what the problem with South Africa is? The bad guys go free and the good huys can't touch them.
Reporter [who is black]: But how did it come to this?
Swart: Look who is running the country. These are guys we arrested. We put them in jail. No wonder they think the criminals are the victims. It's our fault.
Reporter: Who do you mean by "our" fault?
Swart: I mean us, the white cops...from before.
[pause]
Swart: Well...that's a different story. I'll tell you something about this fucker Kuene. I'm going to take him down.

...

Lucky [voiceover]: Nazareth's drug bust and Ngu's covert expansion into all corners of my empire was exactly the excuse that Swart needed.

...

Lucky [voiceover]: They say behind every fortune is a crime. The greater the fortune, the greater the crime. But I don't know about that. It seems the only people who say that probably never made one. What's important in life is to set goals and go after them. Who knows, I might even talk Leah into moving along the coast. After I've moved into a building...or six. After every revolution comes a new order. But before that comes opportunity. After all, wasn't it PW Botha who said, "Adapt or die"?
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 21, 2014 10:43 pm

Point of view and the butterfly effect.

That's what this film explores. The entirety of the "action" encompasses only 20 minutes of a particular afternoon in New Orleans. The same 20 minutes as experienced from the perspective of 5 different sets of individuals: Cory, Alexa and Dom, Marti and Clyde, Doke and Brown, Few.

It's as if you can imagine them sitting down in a classroom afterward and discussing, say, philosophically, what the overall "reality" is here. There will be some things they can all agree on. Things for example that did in fact happen. Things, in other words, that the film viewers can agree upon in turn because they are all watching the same movie.

But there will be other things that [inevitably] revolve around a subjective interpretation of the events. Things that involve motivation and intent. Or things that revolve around moral and political narratives.

It's always the same dynamic. Each of us sees [experiences] only parts of the whole. And we see [experience] it from our own perspective. But imagine an "objective" point of view which sees the whole of the interactions over the entire twenty minutes. Then imagine if we were then given access to the "whole thing". What would we then be more likely to own up to insofar as "what really happend"? And what parts would/could there still be disagreements about? Those parts in which there is no way in which to "settle it once and for all"?

At first the parts here seem entirely disconnected. But then they come into sync. Sort of. But only as points of view. Or as manifestations of, "what if, instead..."

Some pretty decrepit folks here. But then impoverished, working class communities in New Orleans tend to produce them. Or so it would seem. On the other hand there are threads here reaching deep into human interactions that surely do transcend New Orleans. For example, all the way to the Vatican...by way of Dick Cheney's rendition of the war on terror.

The power of few? Few is what folks call her. It is short for Fueisha. She makes a suggestion to a couple of gangsters: "Don't deal with pain by inflicting more". And because they heed her advice there are folks who will live instead of die.

Not only that but she ends up saving the Shroud of Turin. I shit you not.

Look for hyper contingency, chance and change.

One take on it: http://www.popmatters.com/review/170259 ... -than-one/

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Few
trailer: http://youtu.be/WJuovcCmL9k

THE POWER OF FEW [2013]
Written and directed by Leone Marucci
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:23 pm

What is the worst way to die? Well, far too many to count obviously but right up there at [or near] the top of many lists will be "eaten by a shark".

Just think about it. Enough said?

Open water. As in water water everywhere. Literally for hundreds of miles. And there you are bobbing up and down in the middle of it. Alone. Nobody knows you are there. The folks in charge of the diving party don't know how to count. Or was this really more about the guy who forgot his mask? Or the fact that you prefer to keep to yourself...apart from "the group"? Or just a series of misunderstandings whereby you became basically invisible to everyone else? No one seemed to remember you when it was time to go.

Fate perhaps? Or dumb fucking luck?

Anyway, you know it is only a matter of time before the sharks show up. And once that happens it is only a matter of time before things start to disintegrate between them. They are becoming terrified and that makes them angry for being in this terrifying situation and soon enough they need to vent that anger. And venting it on the shark isn't an option.

Based on a true story. This one: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_and_Eileen_Lonergan

IMDb

This film is inspired by a true story about an American couple, Tom and Eileen Lonergan, who in 1998 went with a scuba group (Outer Edge Dive Company) to an area off the coast of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. They were accidentally left behind due to a faulty head count taken by the dive boat crew. There were 26 other divers and 5 crew members who failed to notice that the couple was not on the boat. It was not until two days later on January 27, 1998, that the pair was found to be missing after a bag containing their passports and belongings was found in the dive boat. A massive air and sea search took place over the following three days, but failed to find them. The couple was never found.

Blanchard Ryan is in fact deeply afraid of sharks and as a result Daniel Travis had to enter the shark infested waters first each day to assure her they were not in danger.

The entire movie cost less than half of the cost of a typical Hollywood movie's sound effects budget.

According to an interview with Blanchard Ryan, producers Chris Kentis and Laura Lau spent nearly half of the budget to get Stuart Cove and his shark wranglers for two days, and to make sure the two actors would be completely safe around the sharks.

No CGI was used in this movie. Director Chris Kentis fed the sharks tuna to get real feeling of the main characters being in the ocean together with the sharks. As long as they were eating the tuna they didn't harm Blanchard Ryan and Daniel Travis.


at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Water_(film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/Z9q1qJi1nMs

OPEN WATER [2003]
Written and directed by Chris Kentis

Passenger: Are there any big fish like sharks?
Davis: Yeah. We're going out to the open ocean, so chances are you probably might see a shark or three. But, you know, like I tell everybody who sees a shark, if you don't want to see it, close your eyes. No problem. Sharks over here are not very aggressive towards human beings, so therefore you don't really have to worry about sharks.

...

Davis: Linda is on surface support, so if you surface in a distance away from the boat, you want to let her know that you are OK. You start to let her know you are OK by giving her a big "O" over your head. If you are not Ok, you do the international distress signal. The international distress signal is simple, very easy to do. It's like this:
[he jumps up and down and starts screaming]
Davis: "Help! Help!"


They all laugh.

Davis: Okay, that's everybody.

...

Susan: Where's the boat? Daniel. Where's the boat?
Daniel: That's a good question.
[he spots boats at a distance]
Daniel: I guess it's one of those.
Susan: You gotta be kidding me.
Daniel: It better be one of those.

...

Susan: You think it's time to swim?
Daniel: Swim where?
Susan: I don't know. I think...That one is the closest.
Daniel: Honey, it's a bad idea. We are not sure that's our boat. And if it's not our boat, that means we could swim farther from our boat.

...

Susan: I hate to tell you this, but, I didn't see anything that looks like any kind of coral formation. Could you just show me? I'd just feel better. Cause I don't see anything.
Daniel: Shit!
Susan: What?
Daniel: You don't see it, because it's not there.
Susan: So does that mean...
Daniel: ...that since we've surfaced, we're drifting. Oh, shit.
Susan: But what does that mean? Should we swim? Goddam it. We wasted all this time.
Daniel: Honey, I hate to tell you this, but swim or not, we're going where this current decides.

...

Susan: Was that a shark?
Daniel: I don't know. I think it was a dolphin.
Susan: No it wasn't a dolphin, because if it was you would be over there playing with it!

...

Susan: Oh, Jesus Christ! I thought he said the sharks never come that close.
Daniel: He also said the boat would be here.

...

Susan: But what do we do if it comes back?
Daniel: I don't know.
Susan: Do we splash? Do we stay still? You are the one who watches "Shark Week".
Daniel: First of all, we should be in a cage.

...

Susan: I can't stand not knowing what's under me.

...

Susan: I've just never heard of anything so fucked up in my entire life. Who's ever heard of two people getting left in the middle of the ocean before?
Daniel: I have actually.
Susan: Where?
Daniel: Dive magazines. It's a lot more common than you think.

...

Susan [seeing a shark swimming right in front of them]: What kind of sharks are those?
Daniel: Big ones.

...

Susan: I don't know what is worse, seeing them or not seeing them.
Daniel: Seeing them.

...

Daniel [screaming in outrage]: Unbelievable!! This is truly un-fucking believable. The best part is that we paid to do this. We paid to be out here! We paid those incompetent fuckers to drop us out in the middle of the fucking ocean! We wanted an ocean view. Boy, did we get it?!!

...

Daniel: Could you maybe answer one last question? Has this somehow over the hours become my fault?

...

Daniel: You believe what you want to believe. But I know for certain that we were in the right spot.
Susan: It's not just a matter of being in the right spot. It's being there on time.
Daiel: We were on time. We were early. He said 10:30.
Susan: Do we always have to get it so close? For God's sake, Why don't we stay with the group? We always have to do things different than everybody else?!

...

Daniel: The only reason we are out here in the first place is because of your fucking job!
Susan: What?
Daniel: If it were not for your job, we would not have thrown our plans out the window, rushed around at the last minute and settled on this fucking trip! We would be at home, in the middle of our hectic lives, which right now sounds like heaven to me. And in a month's time, as we planned, seven months ago, we would be where we were supposed to be in the first place, and paying less than we are now to be shark bait!

...

Susan: I can't even believe you'd bring that up right now. You were the one who picked the dates.
Daniel: Oh yeah, of my whopping two choices - this was the better date.
Susan: I wanted to go skiing!

...

Susan: You are all right?
Daniel: Oh, my God. I don't see it.
Susan: Are you ok?
Daniel: I don't know. I'm bit. Oh, my God, honey. I'm bit. The fucker bit me!

...

Daniel: This can't be happening! How could this be happening?! I got bitten by a shark. We could actually be eaten alive by a shark out here. We don't know anybody who's ever been bitten by a shark. There are always three or four guys there on the shark show. They're always surfers!

...

[a camera has been found in a shark's stomach]
Man: Check it out.
[laughs]
Child: What's the yellow thing?
Man: Man, they really do eat anything. I wonder if it works.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 23, 2014 9:15 pm

The comparison is made. The verdict is resounding: This is no Open Water!

Not even close many insist. The first film generated a 74% fresh rating at RT. The second one only a 40% fresh. And, perhaps, more to the point, the first rating was based on 191 reviews. The second? 10. Count 'em: ten.

And no sharks.

Instead, this one revolves more around sheer human stupidity. And yuppie stupidity at that. Some might even call them "Yuppie scum". The men call each other "Dude". They reek of America Youth. They're Kids basically. And [of course] at one with the Beautiful People.

But I liked it. Occasionally. And it is also said to be "based on a true story". At least that is noted on the DVD copy that I own. But I could not find any actual references to that at wiki.

Here the drama swirls largely around the fact that all of the adults are out in the ocean unable to get back on board the boat. Or, rather, the yacht. But: there is also an unattended baby still on board. Again, because of the sheer stupidity that one of these meatheads visits upon all of the others.

And here the irony abounds. In the first film, they come to the surface and the boat is gone. Here the boat is always there. But they have no way to get back on board it. It's sort of like the myth of Tantalus. Or imagine being chained to a chair starving with a table filled with food that is just beyond your reach. It's only a matter of time then, as the situation becomes more dire, that they start to turn on each other. On Dan in particular.

Name of the boat? "Godspeed".

Actually, this is not really a sequel to Open Water. The script for this one was written before Open Water was even in the theatres. And it is neither written nor directed by Chris Kentis

They just tried to take advantage of it I guess. Well, they failed. By and large.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Water_2:_Adrift
trailer: http://youtu.be/SItuuvHmZdk

OPEN WATER 2: ADRIFT [2006]
Directed by Hans Horn

Amy [who is aquaphobic]: Most people are afraid of spiders or afraid to fly or scared of...
Dan: ...scared of clowns?
Amy: Um, it's gotten worse since I had Sarah. I don't want her to end up worrying about stuff like that because of my paranoia.
Dan: You know, my buddy Brad, he was afraid of circus clowns.
Amy: Was? What'd he do?
Dan: Well, we...we took him to the circus.
[he picks Amy up]
Amy [terrified]: No! You let me down, Dan!
Dan: The water looks great.
Amy: Let me down! Let me down... No! No, no, no!
Dan [jumping overboard while holding Amy]: Amy, trust me.


Big mistake.

Lauren: Where's the ladder? Where's the ladder?
Dan: The ladder? Should be...
Lauren: Where's the fucking ladder, Dan?!
Dan: I think it's on the other side.
Zach: It's not on the other side. Or the back.
James: There's no fucking ladder!

...

Michelle: I want to get out now, Dan! I'm getting cold. Dan, help me! Don't leave me alone. I'm tired and I'm cold and I don't want to drown!!

...

Dan: All right, nobody's bleeding. It ain't a shark.
Lauren: How do you know?
Dan: We're still here, aren't we?
Zach: Yeah, that's the problem, Dan.
Dan: I didn't plan for this.
Zach: No shit.
James: Don't you do some sort of pre-flight check, like a pilot...have some sort of emergency backup plans? Isn't that standard? No, obviously not.
Dan: Hey...Who died and made you captain fucking Nemo? You didn't notice either. None of you did.
James: It's your boat!

...

Lauren: If it weren't for you, Dan, Amy would be up there, and we wouldn't be here right now.
Dan: Look...I said I was sorry, okay? I should have checked. I should have checked. I should have checked! What do you want me to say? I didn't think. I made a mistake!
Lauren: You spend millions on a boat, but you don't think?


Turns out it is not even his boat!

Dan: You're the MacGyver. Why don't you build something?
Zach: Yeah. Why not pull a 747 out of your ass and fly us all out of here?

...

Michelle: I feel so cold....I can't move my legs anymore.

...

Michelle [trying to take Amy's life preserver]: What is this? Best friends stick together forever? I'm a person, too. I just don't want to die out here! I don't...I don't want to die! I don't want to die!!!

...

[Michelle recites the Lord's Prayer]
Lauren: Save your breath, Michelle.
Michelle: It doesn't hurt to ask.
Lauren: Yeah. Blessed are those who ask for nothing...for they shall never be disappointed.
[everyone stares at her]
Lauren: What? He lets millions of people die every day. Children die. What makes you think he's gonna save us?
Zach: Well, I ain't no saint but I'd like to think that there's something...something bigger out there...I don't know. Because if there isn't we're all fucked.

...

James [after punching Dan]: He's dead! Zach's dead! Michelle's dead! But you still got your boat, right? Oh, yeah, I'm sorry. It's a yacht! It's a fucking yacht, isn't it? It's a fucking yacht! It's a fucking yacht! Fucking yacht!


Then Dan confesses: He's a fraud. He is not even a yuppie scumbag.

Lauren: I think I'm gonna...I'm gonna go for a little swim. To see if I can make it back to shore.
Amy: It's too far.
Lauren: Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. I'm not gonna die treading water, man. That's just not me.

...

Amy [listening to her baby crying up on the boat]: Dan? I can't move my legs anymore.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 24, 2014 10:01 pm

Just look at it!!

From the director of Vital above. But Tetsuo is to Vital what Eraserhead is to Wild At Heart or Blue Velvet

A movie that is smack dab in the middle of what is called the "Japanese Cyperpunk" genre: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_cyberpunk

Think Lynch's Eraserhead. Or Aronofsky's Pi. Or Tarkovsky's Stalker. Or John Simpson's Freeze Frame. A grim, pervasive "industrial" ambience suffuses the film frame by frame by frame.

It is barely an hour long and explores [among other things] the world from the perspective of someone consumed by or obsessed with a...fetish? In fact there is a program on one of the cable channels that airs "documentaries" of folks who have extremely bizarre fetishes all their own: http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/my-strange-addiction

This one is just more, well, cinematically surreal. And extreme. And the Iron Man never actually pursues it, shall we say, autonomously? Not at first.

Why do people do such aberrant things? Well, for some, that might be on par with asking "why does anyone do anything at all?" They have their reasons. Then you are left to ponder the extent to which the reasons might be more or less understandable. Or sane? I mean, we have to draw the line here somewhere.

But that often becomes murky because we don't really know for certain how all of the parts -- mental, emotional, psychological -- fit together. And in minds ever immersed in subconscious and unconscious states somehow hooked [deeper still] into instinctive drives that go all the way back to the evolution of life itself. Maybe even back to the beginning of time itself. Back to God?

Or is it all more about "man as machine" increasingly sumerged in a "culture of technology" -- one that dehumanizes him to the point that he becomes a reflection more of the technology itself: it's slave rather than its master.

Think: http://youtu.be/iwslFo3ZjTo

Or think whatever the fuck you want. After all, it's not like there is only one right way.

Anyway, be careful who you hit with your car.

From the soundtrack:
http://youtu.be/4z10AlFDQfY
http://youtu.be/JKeDb_jfPTE

Some "takes" on it:
http://www.midnighteye.com/reviews/tetsuo-the-iron-man/
http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res ... A964958260
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/tetsuo-the-ironman/

Or from IMDb:

Tetsuo: The Iron Man is one of those extreme movies that people either love or hate. Director Shinya Tsukamoto - who almost single-handedly created this movie - confronts the audience with his very own visual and sensual universe which is unique in terms of coherence and uncompromisingness. The hysterical mixture of violence, sex, metal and love - filmed in a comic-like and weird quick motion style - is the ultimate cyberpunk movie. If you like experimental movies and are not too squemish, this is a movie well worth checking out.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetsuo:_The_Iron_Man
trailer: http://youtu.be/jZgMglURkjg

TETSUO THE IRON MAN [1989]
Written and directed by Shin'ya Tsukamoto

Iron Man [on phone]: Hello?
Voice: Are you alone?
Iron Man: Yes.
Voice: You know, ever since...I've felt very strange. Since the hit-and-run accident.

...

Woman: Let me in. I can take it.
Iron Man: Stay away!
Woman [angusihing]: What is going on here?
Iron Man: How the hell did this happen to me?
Woman: Come, on. Open up.
Iron Man: No. You'll hate me!
Woman: I told you...I don't scare easily.
[she forces open the door...out comes a mechanical hand]
Iron Man: Do you like what you see? I can't show you anymore. I'm being punished. That must be it.
Woman [inside the room]: I told you I could take it.
[she takes the cover off his head]
Woman: I'm not afraid.


She sees his face: She's afraid. And of his huge mechanical penis [qua drill] too.

Iron Man: You can take it, huh? You want a taste of my sewage pipe?!

...

Man: What the fuck is this? This is unbelievable! How did you make it here? There's a piece of metal stuck in your brain. I can't believe you are still alive! What kind of mad genius inserted it? You'll die if it's removed...Think of it as jewelry.

...

Voice on phone: Don't bother to hang up. I know all about you. You can't escape me. DIE YOU METAL FREAK! DIE!!

...

Iron Man [to Metals Fetishist]: You didn't die!

...

Metals Fetishist [to Iron Man]: Soon even your brain will turn into metal. Let me show you something wonderful. A new world!

...

Metals Fetishist [to Iron Man]: You see all this rust on my body? My first metal implant was already rusty...before my cells began to assimilate it. But your razor was stainless steel! I'll finish you!

...

Metals Fetishist [to Iron Man]: Stop resisting!...Together, we can turn this fucking world to rust! Until it crumbles into the cosmos!

...

Metals Fetishist: Get them!!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:50 pm

Dentists. What is it about them that makes them so entertaining? Well, apparently, one thing and one thing only: their infinite capacity for dullness.

Doesn't it seem that way? Here they are professionals, doctors...earning the big bucks. Well, most of them.

Yet if you are going to have characters that one can truly imagine having [wanting! needing!] a secret life you make them dentists.

Rmember Dr. Oseransky from The Whole Nine Yards? Only here we have two of them. Married to each other.

And here in turn we have your run of the mill "suburbia"...and a marriage that is teetering. Only this one was meant to be taken more seriously. Or it is to the extent that we can figure out what is really going on here...and what is only going on in David's head.

That's how it works. We think our relationship with someone is one thing...and then we begin to wonder if it is something else instead. Then we start in on looking for clues -- signs -- that will tell us what is really going on. Which, in and of itself, can change things between us. Especially when what we imagine might be going on takes over. Is she or is she not fucking somebody else. Though [of course] it is usually the other way around.

And then there are marriages with children. If you have never been there yourself don't think you can possibly understand how this will complicate things. And this one has three of them. When it reaches the point you take out your "adult" problems on them, well, that can be particularly excruciating.

This movie has been done a thousand times. But since each marriage is always unique in it's own way, it has barely scratched the surface in exploring them. Let alone "understanding" them.

Or maybe it's just that going to the dentist is the last fucking thing on earth that most of us want to do. The whole experience is nothing short of ghastly. So we we make them pay for that instead.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Secret ... f_Dentists
trailer: http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3791192345

THE SECRET LIVES OF DENTISTS [2002]
Directed by Alan Rudolph

David [voiceover]: Teeth outlast everything. Death is nothing to a tooth. Hundreds of years in acidic soil just keep teeth clean. A fire that burns away everything else, hair and skin...even bones, leaves your teeth dazzling. Life is what destroys teeth. Undiluted apple juice in baby bottles, sour balls. The pH balance of drinking water, tetracycline, sand in your bread...if you were in the Roman army. Teeth are important. Eskimo cultures abandoned their old folks in the snow when their teeth went, no matter how good their health was otherwise....

...

David [voiceover]: In my experience dentists are convinced patients can't be trusted with their teeth. You can't grieve for every tooth, though...every mouth. You can't even grieve for the worst of them. You can only send the patient home with as many teeth as possible.

...

Slater: You know, no dentist I have ever known has ever had anything good to say about another dentist's work. You notice that?
David: Well, I'm married to one and we're big admirers of each other.
Slater: Well, you better be cheap.
David: Why is that?
Slater: Because five years from now some other guy's gonna tell me he's got to redo all of your work.

...

Dana [to David]: I wish we were closer...sometimes. Do you think Leah's reacting to something between us? Are you asleep, Dave? Dave? David?

...

Dana: You know, you scare me a little.
David: What?
Dana: You do, you always have. Isn't that funny? You don't smile much. Not like most people do, anyway.

...

Dana: Do you like me?
David: I love you.
Dana: I mean, if you weren't sleeping with me. Would you want to talk to me and have lunch with me, and...
David: Yes, I would.
Dana: Do you think that we're friends?

...

Dana: I thought it would be different, you know, our marriage. I thought it would be like the Cinerama...and it would just get wider and wider and it doesn't. It just gets smaller and smaller.



Uh oh. The age old question if you have been married long enough. But better one or the other rather than neither one. Or, rather, you would think so, right?

David [voiceover]: The social nature of the dental situation is the hardest thing for me. There's a certain pleasure for a meditative person like myself in laying down one thread and picking up another as if everything isn't happening at once. I am 38 years old, and it seems to me that I've arrived at the age of grief. My wife is seeing another man and I don't kick her out of the house. And she doesn't kick me out.

...

Slater: Dave, let me explain something to you, okay? People hate you, you're a dentist. They can't wait to get out of your office, okay? They think about you, they think "pain." They would like nothing more than to never have to see you again. And your best work never even sees the light of day.
David: Well, you're going to lose every tooth in your mouth, my friend. You've got one of the worst cases of gum disease I've ever seen. So you can forget about your lousy, little "embouchure".


This unfolds as an imagined encounter -- in David's head? Slater then follows David around throughout the film. Sort of commentating on his life. Or being his sounding board.

David: Everything's more fucked up every day.
Dana: You've always said that, and I hate it.
David: I have not always said it, I just thought of it.
Dan: Girls, you're excused.
David [to the girls]: Stay.
[David turns to Dana]
David: Admit that every day is worse.
Dana: No!
David: It is.
Dana: I don't believe that.
David: Admit it!

...

David [softly as though to himself]: I could kill you.
Dana: What did you just say to me?
David: What? I didn't say anything.
Dana: You said you could kill me?
David: I didn't mean to say that.
Dana: But you thought it, you thought you could kill me?


This is how he explains it to the girls:

David: You can't control your thoughts. A person can think anything they want. But you mustn't act on every thought that you have. Right?

How reassuring that must be after hearing your dad say that he could kill your mom.

Slater [in an imagined conversation]: Why don't you just come right out and ask her?
David: Because...Because, if she tells me she loves him, we have to do something about it.
Slater; Yeah, that's right.
David: But if I let her go through it and work out whatever it is she needs to do...maybe...maybe I can save my marriage.

...

Slater [in an imagined encounter]: These children are monsters, they should be struck...may I hit them?
David: No.

...

Slater [to Dave in imagined encounter]: Hey, why don't you come on tour with us, man? Why do you wanna fight for this shit? Come on, dump the evil bitch. Put the kids up for adoption. Come tour with us. You know you want to.

...

David: Well, until last night I thought I might be misreading the signals somehow.
[Dana says nothing]
David: No?

...

David [to Dana]: I don't want to know who it is. I don't want to know what you did.

...

David: Teeth. Two little rows of stones in the flesh...but as sensitive in their own way as fingertips. Or lips. Impossible. Like marriage. But there they are.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jul 27, 2014 4:48 am

They tell us that modern communication technology begets alienation -- estrangment -- and that eventually it will end up tearing us apart.

Whoever they are. Still, they seem [increasingly] to be everywhere. Or so others tell us.

Aside from the computer and the internet, I don't avail myself of these new technological marvels. No smart phone, no ipad, no texting, no skype, no multi-tasking from one or another wireless device in one or another Starbucks. I don't have a job that is now basically anchored to these "things". I don't have a family to avoid by using them. I don't "stream" my news and entertainment. I don't partipate in "social media" interactions.

But that's just me. Clearly the exception.

Basically, regarding the stuff that we do use to communicate, it all goes back to paraphrasing Shane's reaction to the folks who communicate with a gun: It's as good or as bad as the person using it.

Likewise, the person using it either has intellectual and emotional depth or she doesn't. The technology itself isn't necessarily prone to produce either one of them.

But let's face it: the more connected we are through this techmology the less likely we are to be interacting eyeball to eyeball. As we once did in the past. And the implications of that has in fact become increasingly more problematic -- whatever spin we wish to put on it.

In America, many of the grim morons [and some are true scumbags] portrayed here are mass produced by the culture itself. The technology is just along for the ride. Here we are inundated by American Youth. Of a certain demographic. And the culture of crime. And some of the stuff they do with this technology is just brutal. It's amazing there aren't more kids [more adults] hanging themselves.

I'd weep for the future but fortunately [for me] I'm running out of it.

One thing though seems crystal clear: eyeball to eyeball you see who you are communicating with. Online you [and others] can be anyone [and anything] you want. Not only that but someone can steal your identity and become "you" -- you with, say, your credit card. They can wreck your life piece by piece by piece. Scary stuff.

And that's before we get to the part about the government and Big Brother. Another movie.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disconnect_(2012_film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/aqCcQOlDM4o

DISCONNECT [2012]
Directed by Henry Alex Rubin

[going "private"]
Boitoi [Kyle online]: Did you see my wish list? That's how you can reward me.
Sassy [Nina texting]: Very clever.
Boitoi: You ask a lot of questions, girl. Come on, baby, what do you want? What do you want me to do, huh? Do you want me to jack off for you? ls that it?
Sassy: Oh, my God. Please no. Let's just talk. I'm paying after all.
Boitoi: You want me to touch myself? What are you in the mood for? So you don't...you don't wanna see me jack off or play with these toys or anything? You really just wanna... You just wanna chat?

...

Boitoi [online]: Let's play a game. For a million dollars, would you fuck a dirty, smelly, hairy homeless guy?
Sassy: Oh, my God, no.
Boitoi: No? Not for a million dollars?
Sassy: No!
Boitoi: Okay, two million.
Sassy: No.
Boitoi: Bullshit. Come on. Five million. Five million.
Sassy: Five million? Okay.
Boitoi: You see, everybody has their price.

...

Mike: Well, here's the thing, someone out there has all your information.
[cut to Derek's and Cindy's grim reaction]
Mike: And here's what's gonna happen. I am gonna clone your hard drives, and I'm gonna go through all the information and the activity and see if I can figure out how and when this happened.
Derek: ls this really necessary? Can't you just take the credit card numbers and run that somehow?
Mike: No. This is very necessary. Because right now they could have credit cards in your name, take loans out. They could have your social security number. They could commit crimes in your name. Do you understand? They can sell this information to 20 more people. This, this could just be the beginning.

...

Mike: It's amazing how clueless people are. It's like picking your nose in the car and you think nobody's watching you. And then they wonder how in the world someone got their social security number.

...

Harvey: You know what we do here, Shane? How old are you?
Shane: 15.
Harvey: Let me ask you a question. Do you jerk off?
[Shane nods]
Harvery: Yeah? You wanna get paid for it?
Shane: That would be fucking awesome!

...

Mike: Now, I think some of your personal information may have been retrieved with your communications with "fear&loathing".
Derek: What? Who's fear&loathing?
Cindy: It's just some guy. He's in the chat room I go to.
Mike: All you would have had to do was click on a link or open an attachment from him, and then he would've...He would've installed a Trojan virus onto your system. Now, once he does this, he can do anything he wants with your computer. You log on, you punch in your passwords, it comes up on his screen. Everything you do, he can see. He can turn on your camera. He can watch you.

...

Derek: But who is fear&loathing? Who is he?
Cindy: How does he have my password?
Mike: Your password is your birthday. And, Derek, gambling websites are hacked all the time. And you're also corresponding with the bank regarding your second mortgage.
Cindy: Wait, we don't have a second mortgage.
Mike: Yeah. And you received an e-mail requesting additional information. Now, banks would never ask for sensitive information like that via email. So, I think that's how he possibly got your personal account numbers, your social security number, your mother's maiden name and all that other stuff.

...

Derek: So, when do you think the cops are gonna question this guy?
Mike: It's like I said, these cops, they're swamped. They don't have the resources. It's like, 25,000 people a day get their identity stolen, so...take a ticket.

...

Derek: And what about you?
Mike: We got his name, we got his address.
Derek: Can you go take care of this son of a bitch?
Mike: Derek, I'm a detective, not a hitman.

...

Derek: Cin, no one's helping us. No one's ever gonna help us. I'm gonna find that guy myself. I'll fix this.
Cindy: I wanna come.

...

[their son just tried to hang himself]
Wife: What are you doing?
Rich [on his son's computer]: I'm just trying to figure out what he could have been thinking.

...

Mike: This is bad. You are in big trouble.
Jason: I'm sorry.
Mike: You're sorry? You're sorry?! What are you sorry for? 'Cause I caught you? Or are you sorry 'cause there's a father wondering if his son is gonna wake up?!

...

Rich: Your son is fucking sadistic and he needs help.
Mike: My son needs help? At least my son didn't try to hang himself.

...

Derek: Mike, how are you?
Mike: Hey, Derek. Look, it's not him. It's not him. My guy, Lantos, got Schumacher's IP address and turns out that he is a victim, too.
Derek: What do you mean?
Mike: Someone was using his computer as a proxy, all right? I don't know who, we're tracing it from Texas. Anyway, the bottom line is, Schumacher is not your guy.

...

Kyle [to Nina]: You think Harvey exploits me? I like what I do! Do you get that? I don't wanna be saved from this! I turn people on, so what? You couldn't turn a fucking light on, you know that?!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:10 pm

Ron, meet reality.

And "in reality" everything we once thought had constituted our lives can be yanked the fuck out from under us. And that includes life itself. And when reality suddenly changes in a big, big way a whole bunch of the way we once thought about it can start to slip and to slide out from under us too. And in ways that we never saw coming at all.

Adapt or die. Or adapt and die anyway.

In other words, Ron gets AIDS. And this is back in 1985. In Texas. It was a time [especially there...and around these folks] when if you had AIDS everyone assumed you were gay -- and everyone assumed you were contagious. It scared the shit out of people. So you became...taboo.

Ron though is pretty much a loathsome scumbag. And not just because he is a white heterosexual male from Texas. Instead, it revolves more around the manner in which he conducts his entire life from the perspective of one or another sub-mental prejudice. Everyone is put in a box and it makes absolutely no difference what they think, feel or do: They are in Ron's box and that's that. And down South these dumb bastards are everywhere.

Only Ron bumps into contingency chance and change and his point of view starts to...evolve.

Bottom line: Ron suddenly finds himself facing a very hostile world; and he soon realizes that if he is going to survive longer than they predict he will [30 days tops] he's got to...improvise. And you can't say he doesn't have a strong will to live.

Here it is all over again: The fucking politics of AIDS. The fucking politics of capitalism. The rest as they say is history. I mean, talk about exposing how "the system" works! Crony capitalism at it's most cynical depths.

In part, Ron is the hero because he bucks "the system" and actually succeeds in prolonging the lives of folks with AIDS. At the same time he is still a piece of shit though. He just mimics the system in that all he really cares about is coming up with a new one. It's all about him. If someone is sick and dying but can't afford to join the "buyers club", well, fuck him. But that changes too.

IMDb

The budget was so low for this film that only two-hundred and fifty dollars ($250) was allotted to the Makeup department. Amazingly, the film's artists were able to work within that figure, and the film's Makeup and Hairstyling won an Oscar.

Matthew McConaughey lost 47 pounds in assuming his role as an AIDS patient. Newspapers reported his new looks as "terribly gaunt" and "wasting away to skin and bones". Jared Leto lost 30 pounds for his role.


And we're talking in the vicinity of Christian Bale from The Machinist here.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas_Buyers_Club
trailer: http://youtu.be/cC6mv0KhOBY

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB [2013]
Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée

Ron: Did ya hear Rock Hudson was a cock sucker?
Rog: Whered ya hear that shit?!
Ron: It's called a newspaper. Right there. It's a shame, ain't it? All that fine Hollywood pussy, just all being wasted.
Rog: Who the hell's Rock Hudson anyway?
Ron: He's an actor, dumbass. Haven't you ever seen North By Northwest?

...

Doctor Sevard: We saw something which... which concerned us. In your initial blood work. So, we ran some additional tests.
Dr. Saks: It's your blood tests.
Ron: What kinda blood tests. Cause I don't use drugs.
Doctor: We didn't test your blood for drugs.
Ron: Cause, that ain't none of yer business anyway.
Doctor: You've tested positive for HIV...which is the virus that causes AIDS.
Ron: Are you fucking kidding me? Isn't that that fucking Rock cocksucking Hudson bullshit?!

...

Doctor Sevard: Have you ever engaged in homosexual conduct?
Ron: Homo? Did you say, Homo?
Doctor: Yes.
Ron: Are you fucking kidding me? I aint no faggot, motherfucker. I don't even know no fucking faggots. Look at me. What do you see..huh? A goddamn rodeo is what you see!

...

Doctor Sevard: Mr. Woodroof, If you could listen to me for a moment. I know this can be a very scary thing. And, you're probably feeling alone right now. But, what we'd like to do is to impress upon you the gravity of your situation. Based on your health. Based on your condition, based on all the evidence we have, we estimate that you have about thirty days left. To put your affairs in order.
Ron: Thirty days?
Doctor: I'm sorry.
Ron: Fuck this! What is this shit?! Fucking thirty days. Motherfukers! Let me give y'all a little news flash. There ain't nothin' out there can kill fuckin' Ron Woodroof in 30 days.

...

Big Pharma rep: Sadly, the AIDS crisis will only get worse before it gets better. And, I know I speak for everyone at Avonex when I say, this is a unique opportunity. A chance to be on the forefront in finding a cure.


And to make a small fortune doing it!

Dr. Saks: Does it not drive you just a little bit crazy to see these guys talking about curing the sick while they're flashing gold Rolexes? What do they know about sick patients?
Dr. Sevard: They're Big Pharma reps, not doctors. And like it or not, this is a business.

...

Ron: Can you get me AZT? I know the Avonex industries just released it for testing, right? I wanna buy some, now.
Dr. Saks: That isn't how it works. For about a year, a group of patients will either get the drug or a placebo. It's totally left up to chance, not even the doctors are allowed to know.
Ron: You give dyin people sugar pills?
Dr. Saks: It's the only way to know if a drug works.

...

Ron: How about this stuffs, overseas..huh? In Germany, they got this...Dextran Sulfate. They got this DDC in France...It's suppose to keep the healthy cells you got from getting the HIV. They got AL 721 over in Israel...How can I get some of this?
Dr. Saks: None of those drugs have been approved by the FDA.
Ron: Screw the FDA, I'm gonna be DOA.

...

Dr. Saks: You're in the hospital. You almost died.
Ron: I bet that didn't surprise anybody.

...

Rayon: I'm Rayon.
Ron: Congratulations. Now fuck off and go back to your bed.
Rayon: Relax, I don't bite. I guess you're handsome, in a Texas, hick, white trash, dumb kind of way.
Ron: Get the fuck out of here, whatever you are, before I kick you in the fucking face.

...

Dr. Saks: Mr. Woodroof! Where are you going?
Ron: I signed myself out.
Dr. Saks: You're too sick to leave here.
Ron: The worst-case scenario bein' what?
Dr. Saks: We can keep you comfortable.
Ron: What? Hook me up to the morphine drip. Let me fade in and out? Nah, sorry lady, but I prefer to die with my boots on.

...

Painted on Ron's trailer: FAGGOT BLOOD

...

Ron: I thought AZT's supposed to help me.
Dr. Vass: The only people AZT helps are the people who sell it. It kills every cell it comes in contact with.

...

Ron: I still got HIV?
Dr. Vass: You will always test positive for HIV. And now you've got AIDS from all the toxic shit you've put in your body. You've shut your immune system and now you've got chronic pneumonia, among other things. It could cause memory loss, mood swings, aching joints.
Ron: So if it sucks, I got it.

...

Dr. Vass: This is DDC, it acts as an anti viral similar to AZT but less toxic. And this is Peptide T, it's a protein -- totally non-toxic. Early studies have shown it these can help with all of that. This is what I had you on since you got here.
Ron: And you can't buy them back in the U.S.A?
Dr. Vass: No, not approved.

...

Doctor Sevard: Well, test results are overwhelmingly positive. AZT works.
Dr. Saks: We don't know, what the long term effects are. It's irresponsible.
Doctor Sevard: These people are dying, Eve. There are no long-term effects.

...

Rayon [to Ron]: You know what? You don't deserve our money, you homophobic asshole.

...

Ron: Well, I ain't selling drugs no more, Counselor. I'm giving 'em away. For free. By selling memberships. Four hundred dollars a month in dues and you get, all the meds you want.
David: You son of a bitch!
Ron: Bitches. Plural. There's a bunch of faggots up in New York. Runnin' a hell of a racket. Just like this. That's where I got the idea. Welcome to the Dallas Buyers Club!

...

Reporter on TV: AZT has been approved as the first drug to treat AIDS. At a cost of $10,000 per year per patient, AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Avonex stock jumped a whopping 12%.

...

Ron [to two new members of the "club"]: Meds and the Treatments are free, but the membership is $400 a month. Alright, you're gonna have to sign a waiver. We are not responsibility for the drugs that we give you. You croak, you croak. Thats not our problem. It's yours.

...

Ron [in the grocery store examining the ingredients on a food package]: Now, that's the shit that'll rot your insides. What a surprise, FDA approved.

...

Ron: I don't trust the white coat who's trying to sell me the drugs. I fed-ex it to Seattle to my lab there and they test if for me. Then, I test it all on myself before I give it to anyone.
Dr. Saks: I respect that you're learning about your illness but some of these people need to be in the hospital.
Ron: Why? All they want is to serve up AZT.
Dr. Saks: AZT helps eradicate the virus.
Ron: Fuck the virus, Dr.Saks. You know this. Once you got that, you're married to it. AZT or not. We're talking about symptoms and survival.

...

Ron: People can live with this thing for longer than they're saying. Ninety-six-percent of people in the U.S.A who have AIDS today, are gonna die within six months.
Dr. Saks: I know the statistics.
Ron: Then use them. You don't give AZT somebody with broken immune system? It's toxic!
Dr. Saks: If you're abusing it, like you did, and you're just taking it without medical surveillance, of course it is.
Ron: Yeah, I did abuse it. But I'm off it now, look at me. I'm here, feeling great. And I'm not the only one.

...

Dr. Sevard: Where the hell are my trial patients?

...

Ron: I swear it, Ray, God sure was dressin' the wrong doll when he blessed you with a set of balls.

...

Reporter on TV: Things returned to normal today at FDA headquaters outside Washington. A day after the arrest of 175 demonstrators. The protestors, some of whom are dying from AIDS, brought their interests to the FDA complex. They were demanding faster action on new drugs to fight the deadly virus.

...

Ron: For the hundredth time, just take a fuckin' look at my research.
Richard Barkley: Mr.Woodroof, I wouldnt want you to spend your last days in jail. If you have a product you'd like tested, fill out an application and go through the process.
Ron: Don't threaten me, motherfucker! The "process"? That's FDA bullshit for pay up!

...

Ron: These fuckers are coming at me, man, from all angles. I wanna file a restraining order.
David: Against who?
Ron: Against the government and the fucking FDA, that's who!

...

Ron [to a group of potential club members]: We got a club. Just down the street, where you can get the meds that I'm talking about. We treat more than five times the amount of patients as the large AIDS clinics. And get this...We got one tenth the death ratio.

...

Rayon [in despair]: I don't wanna die! I don't wanna die!

...

Dr. Vass: Check this out. It's The Lancet medical review. And they published a study conducted in France. It proves AZT alone is too toxic for most to tolerate and had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels. Of course, Avonex industries and the NIH didn't include the study in their press release.
Ron: No of course they didn't.
Dr. Vass: Now, these are early trial results for Fluconazole.
Ron: The anti-fungal? I read about this.
Dr. Vass: You want to take some home?
Ron: As much as I can carry.

...

Ron: Anemia, Cancer, Bone Marrow depletion. Seizures, Fever, Hearing loss, Impotence, Neuropathy...Sound like AIDS to you? Nah, that there comes in a box of AZT, a list of side effects. No wonder, Rayon is dead.
Dr. Saks: Rayon was a drug addict! He didn't die for one day on AZT. He died from the disease as a whole!

...

Richard Barkley: Mr.Woodroof, would you kindly, tell us what you are doing?
Ron: Just giving people information, Richard. About this trial I'm in. And, make sure they know what's going on.
Richard Barkley: And, what is going on?
Ron: Why did you cut off, Peptide T, Richard? Non toxic drug, that I got proof works. Not only that but the national institute of mental health, your own people, says it's completely safe.
Richard Barkley: Mr Woodroof, I'm afraid that you're nothing more than a common drug dealer, so if you'll excuse us...
Ron: Oh, I'm the drug dealer? No, you're the fuckin' drug dealer. I mean, goddamn, people are dyin'. And y'all are up there afraid that we're gonna find an alternative without you. See, the Big Pharma companies pay the FDA to push their product. Fuck no, they don't wanna see my research. I don't have enough cash in my pocket to make it worth their while.

...

Ron: Do you ever miss your regular life?
Dr. Saks: Regular life? What is that? It doesn't exist.
Ron: Yeah, I guess. No, I know, I just... I just wanna...
Dr. Saks: What?
Ron: Ice-cold beer, a little riding in. Well, take my woman dancing. You know? I want kids. I mean, I got one...one life, right? Mine. But sh...Fuck, I want somebody else's sometimes. Sometimes I just feel like I'm fighting for a life I just ain't got time to live. I want it to mean something.
Dr. Saks: It does.

...

Judge: The ninth amendment, does not state that you have the right to be mentally healthy or physically healthy. It does state that you have a right to chose your own medical care; but that is interpreted as medical care that is approved.. by the Food and Drug Administration. Regarding the FDA, the court is highly disturbed by its bullying tactics and direct interference with a drug whose own agency has found to be non-toxic. The FDA was formed to protect people, not prevent them from getting help. The law does not seem to make much common sense, sometimes. If a person has been found to be terminally ill.. they ought to be able to take just about anything they feel will help...but that is not the law. Mr. Woodroof, I'm moved to compassion by your plight, But, what is lacking here is the legal authority to intervene. I'm sorry. This case is hereby dismissed.

...

Title card: Following the trial, the FDA in Washington allowed Ron to get Peptide T for his own personal use.

Day 2,557.

Ronald Woodroof died of AIDS on September 12, 1992, seven years after he was diagnosed with HIV. A lower dose of AZT became widely used in later drug combinations that saved millions of lives.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:57 am

Is this to American slavery what Inglorious Basterds was to the Holocaust? In other words, a kind of fantasy in which we are able to imagine the heroes getting...payback?

Of course the heroes in Basterds weren't exactly based on a true story. How about here? Is this a reasonably accurate reflection of the way things really were back then on the plantations? In fact that very point has raised some controversial reactions from a few prominent folks in the black community. Spike Lee in particular. Though there are others. And not just about the use of the "N" word. Which, according to IMDb, was used "over 110 times". The director here being white.

Some accounts of it:

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/ja ... -spike-lee
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jermaine- ... 57739.html
http://www.cnn.com/2013/01/08/opinion/s ... spike-lee/

As for how accurately it portrays slavery, here is an account that focuses in on the mandingo fighting scene:

http://www.historybanter.com/did-mandin ... ly-happen/

In the film, Lt. Aldo Raine becomes Dr. King Schultz. But it's not Nazis he despises...it's slavery. The irony being that in Basterds the actor that plays Schultz here was the Nazi. But they both come off as, well, cartoon characters at times. For Schultz, just think of that fucking tooth flopping back and forth over his wagon.

So, it is sometimes hard to take the "message" here all that seriously. But most folks seem to let this part slide. Why? Because their parts are just so well written and [in the end] we are on their side. Still, there are times when it's more like watching a situation comedy.

Of course some argue that in portraying how easy it was for these heroes to prevail it just begs the question: why weren't there more Jews in Germany and black slaves down South willing and able to do this themselves back then.

In a word: scripted.

That's what these two tales are: wholly scripted. In other words just a bunch of words reconfiguring the world to suit their own purposes.

And it's not like Django makes this all happen. It's a white man.

Sound familiar?

And then there's the part where Schultz refuses to shake Candie's hand, precipitating a bloodbath. Like something out of Kill Bill. I mean, come on. One fucking handshake? Or am I missing something? Like Candie never having had any intention to let him leave alive? I'm sorry but after that this was just one more shark being jumped in one more Hollywood movie. Indeed, from that point on the ending was [for me] rather ludicrous.

But always remember: It's Django. The "D" is silent.

IMDb

According to critic Alex Ross, the alliance between Django and Dr. Schultz is "not as absurd" as audiences might believe, because in the 1840s many German revolutionaries and progressives left Europe for the U.S. where they often became active in the anti-slavery movement.

During the filming of one of the dinner scenes, Leonardo DiCaprio had to stop the scene because he was having "a difficult time" using so many racial slurs. Samuel L. Jackson then pulled him aside telling him, "Motherfucker, this is just another Tuesday for us."

Leonardo DiCaprio, whose role marked the first time he played a villain since The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), was uncomfortable with how horrible and explicitly racist his character was. However, Quentin Tarantino convinced him to be as menacing as possible, saying that if he didn't take it all the way, people would hold it against him forever.

The US$12,000 paid for Broomhilda's freedom equates to just over US$318,000 in 2013 dollars.


faq IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1853728/faq?ref_=tt_faq_sm
at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Unchained
trailer: http://youtu.be/eUdM9vrCbow

Note: Some language might be deemed offensive

DJANGO UNCHAINED [2012]
Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino

Schultz [to the slaves]: Now as to you poor devils. So as I see it, when it comes to the subject of what to do next, you gentlemen have two choices. One: once I'm gone, you could lift that beast off the remaining Speck, then carry him to the nearest town. Which would be at least 37 miles back the way you came. Or two: You could unshackle yourselves, take that rifle, put a bullet in his head, bury the two of them deep, and then make your way to a more enlightened area of this country. The choice is yours. Oh, and on the off chance there are any astronomy aficionados amongst you, the North Star is that one.

...

Schultz: What's everybody staring at?
Django: They ain't never seen a nigger on a horse before.

...

Django: What kinda dentist are you?
Schultz: I haven't practiced dentistry in five years - Not to say once I know you better, I wouldn't like to get a look at that mouth - I'm sure it's a disaster - But these days I practice a new profession ... . Bounty Hunter. Do you know what a Bounty Hunter is?
Django: No.
Schultz: Well the way the slave trade deals in human lives for cash, a bounty hunter, deals in corpses.

...

Schultz: On one hand, I despise slavery. On the other hand, I need your help. If you're not in a position to refuse, all the better. So, for the time being, I'm gonna make this slavery malarkey work to my benefit. Still, having said that, I feel guilty...So, I would like the two of us to enter into an agreement. I'm looking for the Brittle brothers. However, at this endeavor, I'm at a slight disadvantage insofar as I don't know what they look like. But you do. Don't ya?
Django: Oh, I know what they look like, all right.
Schultz: Good. So here's my agreement: You travel with me until we find them...
Django: Where we goin'?
Schultz: I hear at least two of them are overseeing up in Gatlinburg, but I don't know where. That means we visit every plantation in Gatlinburg till we find 'em. And when we find them, you point them out, and I kill them. You do that, I agree to give you your freedom; $25 per Brittle brother.

...

Old Man Carrucan: Django... Django... Django... You got sand, Django. Boy's got sand! I got no use for a nigger with sand.
[he looks to his men]
Old Man Carrucan: I want you to burn a runaway "R" right here on his cheek, and the girl, too. And I want you to take them to the Greenville auction and sell them. Both of them... separately. And this one... you will sell him cheap!

...

Schultz [in disbelief]: Whoa, whoa...let me get this straight: Your slave wife speaks German and her name is Broomhilda von Schaft?
Django: Yep.

...

Big Daddy: Django isn't a slave. Django is a free man. Do you understand? You're not to treat him like any of these other niggers around here, cause he ain't like any of these other niggers around here. Ya got it?
Betina: Ya want I should treat 'em like white folks?
Big Daddy: No that's not what I said.
Betina: Then I don't know what'cha want Big Daddy.
Big Daddy [thinking]: Yes, I can see that. What's the name of that peckawood boy from town works with the glass? His mama works at the lumber yard? He comes by and fixes the winda's when we have a problem?
Mammy: Oh, you mean Jerry.
Spencer: Yeah, that's the boy's name, Jerry. Well that's it then...just treat 'em like you would Jerry.
Betina: Yes, Big Daddy.

..

Betina: So you're really free?
Django: Yes.
Betina: You mean, you wanna dress like that ?

...

Schultz [aiming his rifle at fleeing Ellis Brittle]: You sure that's him?
Django: Yeah.
Schultz: Positive?
Django: I don't know.
Schultz: You don't know if you're positive?
Django: I don't know what 'positive' means.
Schultz: It means you're sure.
Django: Yes.
Schultz: Yes, what?
Django: Yes, I'm sure that's Ellis Brittle.
[Schultz shoots Brittle off his horse]
Django: I'm positive he dead.

...

Schultz: How do you like the bounty hunting business?
Django: Kill white people and get paid for it? What's not to like?

...

Django: You want me to play a black slaver? Ain't nothing lower than a black slaver. A black slaver is lower than the head house nigger...and buddy that's pretty fucking low.
Schultz: Then play him that way.

...

Candie: I'm curious, what makes you such a mandingo expert?
Django: I'm curious what makes you so curious.

...

Schultz: Well, you won't sell your best. You won't even sell your second best, but your third best? You don't wanna sell either, but if I made you an offer so ridiculous, you'd be forced to consider it? Who knows what could happen?
Candie: And what do you consider "ridiculous?"
Schultz: For a truly talented specimen, the right nigger? How much would you say, Django?
Django: ...12,000 dollars.
Candie: Gentleman, you had my curiosity, now you have my attention.

...

Django [playing his role as a black slaver to the hilt]: You niggas gon' understand something about me! I'm worse than any of these white men here! You get the molasses out your ass, and you keep your goddamn eyeballs off me!

...

Schultz: Point being, don't get so carried away with your retribution. You lose sight of why we're here.
Django: You think I lose sight of that?
Schultz: Yes, I do. Stop antagonizing Candie. You're gonna blow this whole charade, and more than likely get both of us killed. And I, for one, don't intend to die in Chickasaw County, Mississippi.

...

Candie: Your boss looks a little green around the gills.
Django: He just ain't used to seein' a man ripped apart by dogs is all.
Candie: But you are used to it?
Django: I'm just a little more used to Americans than he is

...

Candie: Go fetch Hildi, get her cleaned up and smelling nice and sent over to Dr. Schultz's room here.
Stephen: Actually, Monsieur Candie, sir, there's something I ain't told you about yet. Uh, Hildi in the Hot Box.
Candie: What's she doing there?
Stephen: What you think she's doing there. She's being punished. She run off again. She's got ten more days to be in there.
Candie: Take her out.
Stephen: Take her out? Why?
Candie: Because I said so, that's why! Dr. Schultz is my guest. Hildi is my nigger. Southern hospitality dictates I make her available to him.
Stephen: But Monsieur Candie, she run off.
Candie: Christ, Stephen! What is the point of having a nigger that speaks German if you can't wheel 'em out when you have a German guest? Now I realize it is an inconvenience! Still, you take her ass out.
Stephen: Yes sir.

...

Candie: I think you are a bad loser.
Schultz: And I think you're an abysmal winner

...

[Candie puts a human skull on the table]
Schultz: Who is your little friend?
Candie: This is Ben. He's an old Joe that lived around here for a long time. And I do mean a long damn time. Well Ben here took care of my daddy and my daddy's daddy, till he up and keeled over one day. Old Ben took care of me. Growing up the son of a huge plantation owner in Mississippi puts a white man in contact with a whole lot of black faces. I spent my whole life here right here in Candyland, surrounded by black faces. And seeing them every day, day in day out, I only had one question. Why don't they kill us? Now right out there on that porch three times a week for fifty years, old Ben here would shave my daddy with a straight razor. Now if I was old Ben, I would have cut my daddy's goddamn throat, and it wouldn't have taken me no fifty years to do it neither. But he never did. Why not? You see, the science of phrenology is crucial to understanding the separation about two species. In the skull of the African here, the area associated with submissiveness is larger than any human or other sub-human species on planet Earth. If you examine this piece of skull here, you'll notice three distinct dimples. Here, here and here. Now if I was holding a skull of a... of an Isaac Newton or Galileo, these three dimples would be in the area of the skull most associated with creativity. But this is the skull of old Ben, and in the skull of old Ben unburdened by genius, these three dimples exist in the area of the skull most associated with servility. Now bright boy, I will admit you are pretty clever. But if I took this hammer here and I bashed it in your skull, you would have the same three dimples in the same place as old Ben.

...

Candie: White cake?
Schultz: I don't go in for sweets, thank you.
Candie: Are you brooding 'bout me getting the best of ya, huh?
Schultz: Actually, I was thinking of that poor devil you fed to the dogs today, D'Artagnan. And I was wondering what Dumas would make of all this.
Candie: Come again?
Schultz: Alexander Dumas. He wrote "The Three Musketeers." I figured you must be an admirer. You named your slave after his novel's lead character. If Alexander Dumas had been there today, I wonder what he would have made of it?
Candie: You doubt he'd approve?
Schultz: Yes. His approval would be a dubious proposition at best.
Candie: Soft hearted Frenchy?
Schultz: Alexander Dumas was black.

...

Schultz [to Django just befire the shutgun blows him away]: Sorry, I just couldn't resist.

...

Billy Crash [after getting shot in the genitals]: D-jango, you black son of a bitch!
Django: The "D" is silent, hillbilly.

...

Stephen: I count six shots, nigger.
Django [pulls out a second revolver]: I count two guns, nigger.

...

Django: You said in seventy-six years on this plantation, you've seen all manner of shit done to niggers but I notice...you didn't mention kneecapping.
[Django shoots Stephen in the kneecap]
Stephen: Oh, God! Motherfucker! Damn it!
Django: Seventy-six years, Stephen. How many niggers you think you seen come and go? Seven thousand? Eight thousand? Nine thousand? Nine thousand nine hundred and ninety nine? Every single word that came out of Calvin Candie's mouth was nothing but horseshit, but he was right about one thing: I am that one nigger in ten thousand.
[He shoots Stephen in the other kneecap]
Stephen: Oh, you son of a bitch! Oh, you motherfucker! Oh, sweet Jesus, let me kill this nigger!
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jul 31, 2014 1:54 am

This one is all about point of view. And, in particular, about how we come to either trust or not trust others depending on what they are able to make us believe about them. In other words, given the inherent ambiguity embedded in this, everything up on the screen is not necessarily what the audience thinks it is. Reality can become the slipperiest of slopes when you are not in possession of, say, omniscience. And here no one is quite sure what to believe at all. And that's because no one is quite sure what the others have been told by the third party.

Trick question: How is disappearing different from being kidnapped?

Abduction in the age of modern communication technology. Just snap a picture on your smart phone and email it to the victim's loved one. Everything can be go back and forth in real time. But everything can also be traced back and forth in real time. A whole new pardigm shift to be grappled with and understood.

But that's more a digression. A personal observation.

Instead [and as is often the case in films like this], the focus is as much on the power dynamic between the criminals as between them and the victim. Only who is the victim here? It's not until later that we realize just how much acting is involved here. And who is doing it.

And there must be at least a million things that can go wrong in a crime like this. Or go right from another's point of view.

And that's before you get to the part that revolves around human stupidity. And if you watch enough docs on TV you know it's not just something that shows up in the scripted world either.

Look for the plot to thicken. And then thicken some more.

And one thing for sure: How this finally ends is not quite as any one of them planned. Or predicted.

IMDb

Gemma Arterton refused the use of a body double for her nude scene as she wanted to convey genuine fear. She was given a safe word for her to say if she felt uncomfortable in her nude scenes and wanted filming to stop.

In many ways, the cast and crew found the scene where Gemma Arterton has to urinate into a bottle in front of her captors to be more emotionally bruising than when she was first stripped naked.

Technically, the film should be called "The Kidnapping of Alice Creed". The current title sits better with the ambiguous ending.

The first time in any film that Eddie Marsan and Martin Compston have kissed another man. Indeed, this is Marsan's first on-screen kiss at all.

The original ending was much bleaker than the one that ended up in the final film.


Not hard to guess what that was.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Disapp ... lice_Creed
trailer: http://youtu.be/vbeJl3dt0Aw

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ALICE CREED [2009]
Written and directed by J Blakeson

Vic: We need to keep you hydrated. Understand? Just nod if you understand.
[Alice..bound and gagged..nods]
Vic: Now for you to drink, I need to take the gag off. Please, do not scream. We do not want to hurt you. And we certainly don't want to kill you. But we are absolutely prepared to do either or both of these things if we need to. Do you understand?
[more nods]

...

Alice: I have a daughter...she needs me.
Vic [shoving his hand over her mouth]: Please. We know you don't have a daughter. We know everything about you. Now I'm sure it's a natural response, but trying to reason with us is just...
[she bites his hand ... he slaps her viciously and puts his hand around her throat]
Vic: Now listen to me. The only people that can get you out of here are him and me. We are your only friends. I urge you to so as we say. Now, are you going to be quiet and drink from the bottle?
[vigorous nods]
Vic: Good.

...

Vic: You haven't eaten in nine hours after doing physical work...and your still not Hungry?
Danny: No.
Vic: If you're not hungry it means that something's not right. It means you're thinking too much about whether we've done everything right or whether we've made a mistake along the way that'll get us caught and get us 20 years in jail. Or maybe you're thinking about whether we have to rough that girl up...or perhaps even kill her. Or worse, maybe you are getting semi-fucking-mental, now that this girl isn't just theoretical. Now, you've looked into her eyes, maybe you're having second thoughts. Maybe your conscience is easting away at your conviction. And maybe you're persuading yourself that the best thing to do is just go in there, untie her and let her go. Now you listen to me: FUCK THAT!!! FUCK! THAT!

...

Alice [to Danny]: I can't shit with you watching me!

...

Danny: Please. Alice, please. It's Danny! It's me, Danny!!

...

Danny: There's a plan.
Alice: A plan? Fuck, Danny. Just get me the fuck out of here.
Danny: I will, okay? Just listen to me first. We're getting some money from your dad. A lot of money. You hate your dad. You hate him, Alice. He cut you off. He's got all that fucking money. Now he's never going to give you any more of it. We've always talked about a way to get his money off him. Well, this is it, Alice. This is how we get his money.
Alice: But you fucking kidnapped me!! You fucking stripped me naked. You made me piss in a fucking bottle in front of..who? Who the fuck is the other man? Do I know him too?

...

Danny: Vic is no one. I met him on the inside. He doesn't know.
Alice: Know what?
Danny: About us. He thinks you're just a random rich girl. He's not got the whole picture. He thinks all this is his plan. He doesn't suspect that we'll keep all the money. Me and you.

...

Alice: Why the fuck didn't you ask me first?! I thought I was going to fucking die in here. I was fucking terrified!
Danny: I know, I know. I'm sorry, right? But it had to look real, feel real...for Vic, for you.
Alice: Look real?! You can't fucking do that to someone, Danny. You can't make them think that they're going to fucking die!
Danny: You can't fake fear, Alice -- not proper fear. He would have seen that you were pretending. He would have known.

...

Danny: He's going to pay 2 million pounds. In Cash. And all you have to do is lie in that bed.
Alice: Tied up, humiliated, abused.
Danny: It'll only be for another day or so. Not much to ask for 2 million pounds.

...

Alice: Don't let him hurt me. Promise.
Danny: I promise.

...

Alice: But he could just take the money and disappear.
Danny: I know he wouldn't?
Alice: How can you be sure?
Danny: I just am. Trust me.

...

Danny: But we had a plan!
Alice; No, you had a plan. This is my plan.

...

Danny: Alice, please, you can't do this. I love you.
Alice: No, Danny. When you love someone, you do everything you can to take care of them. What you don't do is kidnap them, understand? You don't fuckimg jump them in the street and put them in the back of a fucking van. You don't put a fucking knife to their throat!

...

Vic [to Alice]: WHO FIRED THE GUN?!!

...

Alice [to Vic]: Fuck him, right?

...

Vic: Danny, let me ask you something. Why did you choose her?

...

Danny: But what if we don't make it back? She'll be stuck here. She'll die.
Vic: So? If we don't make it back, why do you care if she don't make it?
[long pause]
Danny: I don't care.

...

Danny: The hole. The hole was for the money.
Vic: No. This hole's for you, Danny. They didn't fuck up. You did. You killed her Danny. You not only killed yourself but you killed her too.

...

Danny [to Alice]: You should have listened....
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Fri Aug 01, 2014 10:05 pm

Based on a true story: the writer/director's own. Roughly as it were.

In which the question is asked: Where the fuck do we fit into all of this...this...this stuff. And to which the answer seems to revolve [to me] around just how teeny and tiny and infinitesimally insignificant we must actually be. In, say, the context of "all there is".

Actually, when it comes to flesh and blood human beings, it's more like the trees of life. In that no two are ever exactly the same. Just as a weeping willow is not an oak is not a pine is not a banyon is not a palm.

Still, just as a tree is a tree is a tree so we as a species all share certain traits in common. Just don't go thinking that if you've seen one you've seen them all. And given that the trees on the tree of life don't have brains or personalities or character traits or a sense of self, by the time the tree evolved into us all bets were off.

Bottom line: The "tree of life" can never really be anything other than an expression we use to encompass life at its broadest point...in its broadest sense.

So, right off the bat: In exploring all of the Big Questions that can either perplex or plague us the film narrows the beam down considerably to one particular family living in one particular time and place. We see ourselves in them and/or we don't. But one thing's for sure: we can only take out of them what we are first able to put into them: dasein. Thus what some might construe to be profound insights from the characters others will only construe to be the hackneyed bromides of, say, the filmmaker.

And into all of this [almost inevitably] are thrown God and religion:

Mrs. O'Brien [voiceover]: Lord, Why? Where were you? Did you know what happened? Do you care?

Young Jack [voiceover]: Where were You? You let a boy die. You let anything happen. Why should I be good...when you aren't.

And all that Book of Job shit again.

And this all unfolds in the 1950s. A whole other world in some respects. And in Texas no less.

What's it all nean? Well, let's start here:

Some American theaters set up signs - warning moviegoers about the enigmatic and non-linear narrative of the movie - following some confused walkouts and refund demands in the opening weeks. IMDb

Can you even begin to imagine your "typical American" watching this?!!

Anyway, it sure is beautiful to look at. In part, like watching a National Geographic Special. In part, like watching Koyaanisqatsi.

And look for the cold and the calculating ravages of capitalism to poke its nose in from time to time. Hey, we're all expendable. And the endless debate about "how to parent": More like mother -- a nurturing love? Or more like father -- a tough love? Who really does know "best"?

IMDb

Dissatisfied by the look of modern computer generated visual effects, director Terrence Malick approached veteran special effects supervisor Douglas Trumbull, who was responsible for the visual effects in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), to create the visual effects for the film using bygone optical and practical methods.

In August 2011, Sean Penn gave an interview to the French publication "Le Figaro" in which he was very critical of the movie and Terrence Malick's direction. Penn said "I didn't at all find on the screen the emotion of the script, which is the most magnificent one that I've ever read. A clearer and more conventional narrative would have helped the film without, in my opinion, lessening its beauty and its impact. Frankly, I'm still trying to figure out what I'm doing there and what I was supposed to add in that context. What's more, Terry himself never managed to explain it to me clearly."

Emmanuel Lubezki explained Terrence Malick's approach to film by saying "Photography is not used to illustrate dialogue or a performance" but instead is used "to capture emotion so that the movie is very experiential". So the film, with Lubezki's own words, is "meant to trigger tons of memories, like a scent or a perfume".

The butterfly that landed on Mrs. O'Brien's (Jessica Chastain) hands was not CG but a real one. One morning while both Chastain and Brad Pitt were rehearsing, Terrence Malick spotted it flying around. He got the crew and Chastain following it three blocks of Smithville, then got her to step into the middle of a street and hold her hand up.

The tree of life that appears in the film is a gargantuan 65000-pound live-oak tree situated at Smithville, Texas.


FAQ at IMDb: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478304/faq?ref_=tt_faq_sm
at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tree_of_Life_(film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/WXRYA1dxP_0

THE TREE OF LIFE [2011]
Written and directed Terrence Malick

Title card: Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth?...When the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy? Job 28: 4,7

...

Mrs. O'Brien [voiceover]: The nuns taught us there were two ways through life - the way of nature and the way of grace. You have to choose which one you'll follow. Grace doesn't try to please itself. Accepts being slighted, forgotten, disliked. Accepts insults and injuries. Nature only wants to please itself. Get others to please it too. Likes to lord it over them. To have its own way. It finds reasons to be unhappy when all the world is shining around it. And love is smiling through all things. The nuns taught us that no one who loves the way of grace ever comes to a bad end.


Got that? In other words, blessed are those who can delude themselves into reducing their own life down to platitudes like these. After all, what else is there when the telegrams arrive?

Father Haynes: He is in God's hands, now.
Mrs. O'Brien: He was in God's hands the whole time. Wasn't he?

...

Grandmother [trying to console her daughter]: Life goes on. People pass along. Nothing stays the same. You still got the other two. The Lord gives and the Lord takes away. That's just the way he is. He sends flies to wounds that he should heal.

...

Jack [voiceover as an adult]: When you're young it's all about your career. You don't understand anything. I just feel like I'm bumping into walls. The world's gone to the dogs...and getting worse.

...

Mrs. O'brien [to God]: Did you know? Who are we to you? Answer me.

...

Mr. O'Brien [to his sons]: Your mother's naive. It takes fierce will to get ahead in this world. If you're good, people take advantage of you. Every one of these top executives...you want to know how they got where they are?

...

Preacher: Job imagined he might build his nest on high...that the integrity of his behavior would protect him against misfortune. And his friends thought, mistakenly, that the Lord could only have punished him because secretly he's done something wrong. But no. Misfortune befalls the good as well. We can't protect ourselves against it. We can't protect our children. We can't say to ourselvres, 'Even if I'm not happy, I'm going to make sure they are'. We run before the wind. We think it will carry us forever. It will not. We vanish as a cloud. We wither as the autumn grass. And like a tree, are rooted up. Is there something everlasting in the scheme of the universe? Is there nothing which is deathless...nothing which does not pass away? We cannot stay where we are. We must journey forth. We must find that which is greater than fortune or fate. Nothing can bring us peace but that.


Cue God and immortality and Salvation.

Mr. O'brien [to his family]: Frank Johnson. He owns half the real estate in town. He started out as a barber. But he built something big. Now you'd think he's the fourth person in the Holy Trinity. They never talk about their money. The wrong people go hungry...die. The wrong people get loved. The world lives by trickery. If you want to succeed you can't be too good.

This sermon after the family has left church. Having heard about the travails of Job.

Young Jack [voiceover...about his father]: He says, 'Don't put your elbows on the table'. He does. He insults people. Doesn't care.

...

Mr. O'Brien [to his son]: Toscanini once recorded a piece sixty five times. You know what he said when he finished? "It could be better." Think about it.

...

Young Jack [voiceover]: What have I started? What have I done?

...

Mr. O'Brien: You are not to call me "Dad". You will only call me "Father".
Young Jack: But...
Mr. O'Brien: Don't interrupt!
Young Jack: But you do...
Mr. O'Brien: Don't interrupt!
Young Jack: It's your house. You can kick me out whenever you want to. You'd like to kill me.

...

Young Jack [voiceover]: What I want to do, I can't do. I do what I hate.

...

Young Jack [voiceover]: I didn't know how to name you then. But I see it was you. Always you were calling me.

...

Mrs. O'Brien: Come here!
Young Jack: NO! I'm gonna do what I want to do. You let him walk all over you.

...

Mr. O'Brien [voiceover]: I wanted to be loved because I was great. A big man. I'm nothing. Look at the glory around us; trees, birds. I lived in shame. I dishonored it all, and didn't notice the glory. I'm a foolish man.


To wit:

Mr. O'Brien [to Mrs O'Brien]: They're closing the plant. I was given this choice: no job or transfer to a job nobody wants.
[he pauses...reflecting]
Mr. O'Brien: I never missed a day of work. I always tithed on Sunday.

...

Mrs. O'Brien [voiceover]: I give him to you. I give you my son.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Sat Aug 02, 2014 10:19 pm

For some, it's hard [really hard] to wrap their head around the idea of a woman paying a man for sex. It's like it goes entirely against the laws of nature. And it's not like you see it very often in films. For every American Gigolo there must be at least a thousand films in which the man pays the woman. You know, the way it's supposed to be.

And when these laws of nature are reversed it is almost always the case that the woman is very, very wealthy and the man is very, very handsome. You wonder: is this some sort of a genetic thing?

On the other hand, whether it's the man paying the woman or the woman paying the man, there are the folks in the background. The families and the loved ones of those either giving or receiving.

After all, there are any number of reasons why someone might choose to become a prostitute. And the folks in the background can cover lots and lots of terriotory. In other words, the pain inflicted can go in any number of directions.

Here the man chooses to to play the skin game because his career as an esteemed novelist is going nowhere fast -- but he still has a wife and a kid to support. He needs the dough in other words.

But what makes this all the more problematic is the part about love. One couple has an open marriage...and the other couple does not. With one ouple everything is all out in the open. Not so with the other.

And then there's the part about growing old...about death: Tobias: All my organs turned against me. Those little bastards!

James Coburn plays the character in the film who is dying. The year after the film came out he did. In reality.

Too bad about the ending though. Too many sharks to count.

Look for that guy from the Rolling Stones.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_fr ... ian_Fields
trailer: http://youtu.be/UKD-eNyW7Ao

THE MAN FROM ELYSIAN FIELD [2001]
Directed by George Hickenlooper

Luther [voiceover]: Pasadena, home to little old ladies, noble laureates... high tech science, beautiful museums... and a Pulitzer Prize winner or two. Welcome to a city where people still read.

...

Customer [at the remainder bin]: Did you write this book?
Byron: It only took 7 years out of my life...but don't let that influence you.

...

Luther [voiceover]: This is the story of Byron Tiller...a modest man living in a modest Pasadena neighborhood. A neighborhood built for middle income families... when the middle was still closer to the top than the bottom.

...

Byron: I sold a book today.
Dena: Hey, that's good!
Byron: I haven't done the math, but I think it'll bring us another 3 cents. Course the taxes will kill us.

...

Luther [voiceover]: Tucked neatly between the Hollywood porn shops, novelty shops...and Scientology shops...crammed in amongst the recording studios whose heyday had long past... the unproduced screenwriters whose deals had long lapsed...the bad actors teaching methods on emoting to other bad actors who dream of one day passing an audition...sat Byron Tiller, who until recently believed writing novels...no one wanted to read was a real job.

...

Luther [voiceover]: Goals have a way of becoming less high-minded when you need money.

...

Editor: Excalibur must be great. Everyone wanna kill each other just to get it.
Byron: It's the sword that King Arthur himself pulled out of the rock.
Editor: I know the back story. It just seems a little out of place in a novel about migrant workers.
Byron: Well, Excalibur represents a symbol. It represents to me the downtrodden's hopes and dreams for the future. And the migrant workers are simply a microcosm.
Editor: Aren't they always? See...that's where we have a problem. I'll tell you a little secret about microcosms -- people hate them. Think about it. Who'd sit on a bus to read a book saying you're part of a microcosm? Already knows it. He looks around and he knows. Symbolism's worse. Poor bastard picks up a book, he wants it spelled out. No one wants to waste their time looking for deeper meaning.
Byron: My wife thinks it's the best thing I ever wrote.
Editor: She must love you very much.

...

Editor [handing back Byron's manuscript]: Maybe next time.

...

Byron: Could I get an advance?
Editor: On what? You know I'd like to, but...
Byron: Virgil, I know that my problems are not your problems but I got nothing left to live on.
Editor: Are you really that desperate?
Byron: Yes.
Editor: Then use that emotion. All of the best novels are written in desperation.
Byron: So are the best suicide notes.


Enter the man from Elysian Fields.

Luther: Don't you think you're making a mountain out of a mole hill?
Byron: The problem is that my mountain has shrunk into a mole hill. And unless you have family of moles how do you live?
Luther: A man can always support his family if he's willing to do the necessary.

...

Byron: Paul Pearson! I thought it was you. Good to see you.
Paul: Good to see you. Things going well since you left us?
Byron: Yes, great. I've just had my first novel published.
Paul: So I hear. Been meaning to read it, but couldn't find it anywhere.
Byron: Right. So, how's the office? -You know advertising. I miss it. The action, the deadlines. There's a hell of an adrenaline rush there. I'd even consider getting back in under the right circumstances.
Paul: You told me to go fuck myself.
Byron: That was the adrenaline talking.
Paul: You'd really be willing to come back? Salary'd be smaller, accounts would be shit.
Byron: Whatever you decide.
Paul: Well, that's a good attitude. Why didn't you have it before?
Byron: Well, I've grown up a little.
Paul: I'm very glad to hear it.
Byron: Thank you. I'll see you in the morning?
Paul: Actually, I think it'd be better if you just go fuck yourself.


Ouch.

Dena's father: If you write the Goddamned Iliad who knows if anyone's going to buy it. Take your last book. Nice little review on the "Times"...meant nothing, right?
Byron: In that neighborhood.
Dena's father: What kind of business is that?
Byron: Ask what Gutenberg was thinking.
Dena's father: I don't give a damn what Gutenberg was thinking. Let's cut the bullshit. You need money, right?
Byron: Just a loan.
Dena's father: I've given the matter a lot of thought...and I won't lend you the money.
Byron: Why?
Dena's father: What was it Shakespeare said? "Neither a borrower nor a lender be".
Byron: Look, I'm only here because I promised your daughter I would meet you...and stick my tongue up your ass. I guess my work here is done.
Dena's father [as Byron turns and walks away]: We both know you'll never be able to support your family. Think about it!


I think Byron is now desparate enough to "do the necessary".

Byron: So, what is it? What kind of business is it that you're in?
Luther: Elysian Fields is an escort service.
Byron: An escort service. So what you're saying is you sort of...you know, stand on a street corner and put on a cowboy hat?
Luther: No. We're not hustlers. We tend to the wounds of lonely women in need of emotional as well as spiritual solace.
Byron: Women.
Luther: Often only as friendship.
Byron: Only women?
Luther: Call me old-fashioned.

...

Byron: And this is the job that you thought I would be right for?
Luther: Well, you're handsome, well-educated, and compassionate.
Byron: How do you know I'm compassionate?
Luther: Remember, I'm the one who read your novel. Compassion was its best strength. Even if the premise was shit.
Byron: If you would've read the fly leaf, you'd have noticed I'm married and have a kid.
Luther: All the better. A family at home prevents any unnecessary entanglements...with the clientele.
Byron: Look, I'm not trying to sit on top of any moral high ground but this business you're in, doesn't it make you a little bit ashamed?
Luther: No. Poverty does that.

...

Luther: How much body hair do you have?
Byron: What?
Luther: How much body hair do you have?
Byron: Body hair? Why?
Luther: With the amount they pay, they can afford to be particular.

...

Luther: Andrea Allcott, 35 years old. Charismatic. Face of an angel. You should have a lot in common. Her husband's a novelist, too. Just like you. You may have heard of him. Tobias Allcott.
Byron: Tobias Allcott, the Pulitzer Prize winner?
Luther: Yeah, well, actually, I think he's won three.

...

Nigel: You ever done this kind of work before? It's like rolling off a log. Just don't roll off until they finish.
Byron: Well, Luther actually said that they don't all necessarily want to...to...
Nigel: Right. Right. You'll get used to it. It's when they want you to hold them afterwards, as if it meant something. That's when you realize it's all bullshit. But what business isn't? Could be selling used cars. At least we give them their money's worth. But don't worry, Byron. You'll be fine. All these rich bitches want is some companionship...and sex. We're like cocker spaniels with hard-ons.
Byron: I'll keep that image in mind.

...

Luther [voiceover]: Everyone is nervous the first time. It was important for Byron to meet someone beautiful. Someone like Andrea Allcott, who, indeed had the face of an angel. And it wasn't just her face. Plastic surgeons make money to buy yachts for rearranging nature... in a more pleasing way. No, this wasn't just a run-of-the-mill angel. This one, I'm sure...God handled himself.

...

Luther [to Byron]: I don't know why they call them outstanding checks...as if not being paid is somehow a good thing.

...

Byron: Are you surprised I'm a writer?
Andrea: Actually, no. You're not the sort of man who'd be satisfied taking lonely women around.
Byron: Oh, so you are lonely.
Andrea: There's nothing lonelier than watching the man you love slowly die.
Byron: "Death. The only immortal... who treats us all alike, whose pity and whose peace and whose refuge... are for all."
Andrea: Very beautiful.
Byron: Mark Twain.
Andrea: The reality is less poetic.

...

Andrea: Mr. Allcott wants you to bring him his breakfast.
Byron: Me? Why?
Andrea: Well, it'll come up in conversation.

...

Byron: What is the main theme you actually wanted to write the book about?
Tobias: That every social structure makes slaves out of one group or another.
Byron: That's terrific! So what do you need Roman slaves for?
Tobias: What's wrong with them?
Byron: Nobody can identify with them. Prove that instead with another oppressed group. There's enough to pick from. This could be the greatest novel that you ever wrote.
Tobias: I already thought it was.
Byron: You just gotta get rid of the Roman slaves and find yourself another...microcosm. Tobias: Blacks? Jews? Homosexuals?
[to each Byron shakes his head no]
Tobias: Who, then?!
Byron: Migrant workers.

...

Byron [to Dena]: Do you think that I enjoy having to do it this way? How many chances happen in a lifetime? lf there is one, grab it. Even if you hate everything that comes with it! And I hate this! I hate it! But I'm doing it for you! I'm doing it for Nathaniel!

...

Tobias [to Byron]: Be careful of women who love you just the way you are - it's a sure sign they settle too easily.

...

Tobias: Byron. Wait a minute. If it would make you feel any better...I've already begun to have chest pains.

...

Byron: You know, when a man is concerned with taking care of his family, his priorities can get all scrambled. But it has nothing to do with love.
Client: For what I'm paying you, I expect you to be on my side in everything.

...

Nigel: Who are you with?
Byron: Norma Van Reuten, of San Marino.
Nigel: Christ! She's the one who likes having her toes sucked. Just some advice...make it easy on yourself. Do not take her dancing first, okay?

...

Dena: What makes a man do what you do?
Nigel: I think of our mission as a way of giving joy to others, my darling.
Dena: Actually, I, um, I really need to know the truth.
Nigel: Well, its simple. Fucking is the last resort for a man who feals impotent.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
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Re: philosophy in film

Postby iambiguous » Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:16 am

Objectivists with guns. Lots of them. And Kids too. Or close enough.

You can almost imagine this being based on a true story. Just as you can almost imagine it happening still today. Some no doubt would like it to. And not just at a military academy where kids play at being soldiers. Some I suspect would very much like it if the entire military apparatus would collectively get up, go to the windows, open them, stick their heads out and yell, 'we're as mad as hell and we're not gonna take this anymore!'

Then the country could be yanked back to the 1950s, and all the fucking troublmakers would be silenced once and for all. Brutally if necessary.

Duty. Honor. Country. And God of course.

Authoritarian right down to the bone. Though some are considerably more fanatic about it than others.

And, really, unless you have actually been in the military [and I was] you cannot even begin to grasp just how anal some of them can be about having a rule for every fucking thing that you think, feel and do.

The irony here is that capitalism and the military industrial complex are [in many important respects] just two different ways of saying the same thing. But these particular capitalists want to tear the military academy down in order to build [what else] condominiums.

Sean Penn's first feature film. Tom Cruise's second.

IMDb

Prior to the production of the film, the key actors -Timothy Hutton, Sean Penn, Tom Cruise and others - were required to participate in a 45-day-long period of orientation with the students of Valley Forge Military Academy. They were given uniforms, borrowed from their real life counterparts at the school and given authentic military haircuts. They slept in campus barracks and were subjected to the same rigors and hardship that all Valley Forge cadets went through. While most of the actors enjoyed and excelled at their orientation, Cruise opted to leave the training for the comforts of a nearby hotel until filming began.

at wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taps_(film)
trailer: http://youtu.be/Ob2DIURBXts

TAPS [1981]
Directed by Harold Becker

General Bache: Was I scared! I must have lost 20 pounds, all of it brown.

...

General Bache: But fear has a way of providing you with a little bonus. It gives you...the wolf.
Cadet: The wolf?
General: It's a quotation from Theodore Roosevelt. Let me see. "All men who have felt the power of the joy of battle know what it's like when the wolf rises in the heart."


Oorah!

General Bache: I tell you what. Let's drink to the one thing that never changes. To the one permanent part of a man's life.
Cadet: What's that, sir?
Brian: Honour.
General: Honour, indeed. Burglarproof, foolproof, weatherproof. 100% proof. Honour. Everything else is subject to the powers that be, dependent upon the caprices of often inferior men. But your honour is your own, inviolate.


On the other hand, you have to be honorable about the right things.

General Bache: Ladies and gentlemen, for 141 years, old soldiers like myself have stood here on this day and told the finest of America's young men the meaning of the word "commencement". It is a beginning, we told them. But today, this day, it has another meaning, an end. An end to nearly a century and a half of tradition and an end to the heart of us. I have been informed that Bunker Hill Academy is to be closed, all of its buildings torn down, nothing to be left...but memories. It is the decision of the board of trustees in their wisdom that this institution be sold and the land developed for its real estate potential.

...

Brian: Sir, how could they do this?
General Bache: With the stroke of a pen, sir. Their field of honor was a desktop.


That and a really big bank account.

General Bache: I came to Bunker Hill when I was 12 years old. Just like you. With the exception of those years, I've been in uniform all my life. I know men younger than myself who take their pensions and put on stupid little white shirts with cut-off sleeves, alligator on the tit, and spend the rest of their days beating the hell out of a little white ball with an iron club. My God! The thought of it makes me want to puke.
Brian: They like it like that, civilians.
General [bitterly]: Well, the one thing civilians know is their rights. And they're within their rights to push us out to make way for their goddamned condominiums.

...

General Bache: But we have one little advantage on them.
Brian: What's that, sir?
General: We're here. And the condos aren't. We have a foothold. You boys are my purpose. You're my family. And I'm not going to let them take you away from me.
Brian: We won't either, sir. We won't let them.

...

Alex [to Brian]: The guy's a maniac.
David: Damn right I am. I Saw my duty and I did it!

...

Brian: When my mother died I was sitting in the hallway in the army hospital. I was worried as hell. I knew she was real sick. She had this bad kidney thing. So I'm sitting there and my father comes out of the room and tells me that she's dead. He led me to this little chapel they had there and he sat me down and he told me I could cry for 15 minutes. He gave me 15 minutes to cry and after that I wasn't supposed to cry again. So he left me alone in the chapel and came back... he came back 15 minutes later.
Alex: Jesus. What did you do?
Brian: Well, I did what I was told. I cried for 15 minutes.

...

Sergeant Moreland [Brian's father]: Let me tell 'em it was growing pains - the wrong execution of the right idea.
Brian: "The wrong execution of the right idea"?!

...

Sergeant Moreland: You're not thinking straight. You have a bad way to lose a pretty bright future, kid.
Brian: Stop calling me kid.
Sergeant Moreland: You expect me to call you Major? You can forget it. Look at this operation. You got your strength nose to nose with the cops. Eventually even they'll figure out you've got a vulnerable rear flank and they'll sneak in. There, by the field, behind the trees, and they'll throw a net over your pink little asses.
Brian: You can say that...
Sergeant Moreland: The first canister of tear gas, half your troops'll wet their pants and run. And how bright was it to let this delegation in here? Look at me. I could break your neck and you wouldn't be able to do a thing about it.
Brian: You'd be shot. My next in command would take over. We could take you all as hostages, but we won't. We have a code of honour.
Sergeant Moreland: Sweet Jesus! Is that what this is all about? Somebody's lofty shit about honour? Yours?!

...

Brian: Alex, you've been picking at this from the beginning. What's wrong with you? Things are going beautifully. We're in better shape now. Now we're a corps. General Bache used to talk about men under pressure. How they act as one. We're seeing it.
Alex: Thus spake Saint Bache? Look, he's only a man, Brian. Like your father, my father. Just a man. Not every word out of his mouth is some holy nugget.
Brian: Right. Whatever you say.
Alex: Don't let that display of loyalty go to your head. It won't mean beans to anybody out there. They'll say it was brainwashing. Maybe they're right.

...

Colonel Kerby: I'm urging them to take into consideration your youth and the strain...
Brian: Cut the bullshit. Nobody in here's young any more.
Colonel Kerby: Excuse me if I don't shed tears over your lost youth. You've had your chances to toss it in. You've got this chance. The governor is this close to ordering us to take you in by force. When that order comes, I'll do it and you won't ever be that unhappy again. I'll have to do it.
Brian: I know what they want us to do. They want us to be good little boys now so we can fight some war for them in the future. Some war they'll decide on. We'd rather fight our own war right now.

...

Colonel Kerby: Brian, we're talking about boys so young they haven't got hair one between their legs.
Brian: That's never been a qualification for a soldier. The final stage of any mobilisation is the children, the seed corn.
Colonel Kerby: Good Christ! What in God's name did they teach you in here? What did they turn you into?
Brian: A soldier. The only thing I ever wanted to be.
Colonel Kerby: You're not a soldier! I'm a soldier, with the career goal of all soldiers - staying alive in situations where it ain't all that easy to do! But you my friend...you're a death-lover. Oh, I know the species. Seventeen years old and some sorry son-of-a-bitch has put you in love with death. Somebody sold you on the idea that dying for a cause is oh, so romantic. Well, that's the worst kind of all the kinds of bullshit there is! Dying is only one thing: bad.


Right. I'm sure that's the pep talk the boys going to Iraq and Afghanistan heard.
He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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