A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:21 pm

thinkdr wrote:.
Earlier we derived three dimensions of value that occur on the values spectrum. [See viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194809&p=2721916&hilite+dimensions&sid%20
or see the first few pages of Basic Ethics: a systematic approach.] As you recall, the three value dimensions are Systemic Value, Extrinsic Value, and Intrinsic Value. Now let’s apply these dimensions to Ethical Decision-making, as follows:

Systemic: What if everyone everywhere did what I’m about to do (or just did)? Would I want to live in that kind of a world? What if everyone lived by a maxim or principle which states the standard which I am establishing here and now as a norm by my conduct? Would I have an ethical world thereby? Would it be a better place than the chaotic and confusion-filled place, the corrupt place, in which we now live?

Extrinsic: What is best for the greatest number of people? What consequences follow from my conduct? What ends may result? What goals and policies can occur if I behave in a certain way, say if I campaign for a better world; or, in contrast, if I am part of the problem – by being corrupt, selfish, or extremely hypocritical?

Intrinsic: Care-based Thinking. Am I treating others as I want to be treated? Am Icarefully avoiding to do to others what I would consider to be morally-questionable (or even despicable) if done to me? Do I avoid putting others down, disparaging them, deliberately-offending them, or even insulting them?
Do I, in my interactions with others, proceed as if they are of uncountably-high value? [That of course - by the definition of “Ethics” (in the new paradigm for ethics known as the Unified Theory of Ethics - is how to be ethical.] I am being ethical when I see an individual as actually or potentially highly valuable!
Do I show others some respect, and do I express self-respect?
Do I show I care by being ready to be of service? Do I in some way help to uplift others? Do I, within my capacities, seek out responsibility? And am I ready and willing to be held accountable for my performance?

Here – from page 36 of Basic Ethics – quoted by permission -- are some further guides to making an Ethical decision:

MORAL DILEMMAS: AN ANALYSIS
When confronted with a dilemma people can view it at least three ways:

Systemically – What are the relevant rules, procedures, norms, methods, codes?
What would the authorities say? Or

Extrinsically – What is the cost-benefit analysis and the pragmatic considerations? Or

Intrinsically- What best builds community? What would a compassionate, caring person of good character be likely to do?
A detailed discussion, with many illustrative examples, is found in the book by Rushworth Kidder – HOW GOOD PEOPLE MAKETOUGH CHOICES (NY: Random House, 0996)


Or, perhaps, we might call it the serious philosopher's guide to ethical decision-making. :wink:
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:20 pm

Thank you, iambiguous.


Note that in the first item in the References below, the booklet entitled THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS, on page 42, a tool for moral self-analysis is provided. Wouldn't you agree that that tool can also serve as a serious guide for Ethical decision-making?
I think it does.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:27 am

I failed to mention something important pertaining to the topic of this thread.

Intrinsic Value is far, far more valuable to us than Extrinsic Value is. [I-values have at least as large number of properties as a continuous line segment has points. E-values have as many properties as there are integers. The former - the number of repeating and non-repeating decimal fractions - is infinitely-larger than the latter.]

In turn, the Extrinsic values are way larger in value than the Systemic values.

Therefore, when considering which way to go when making an ethical decision, give preference to the Intrinsic reasons. They are to carry more weight.

Comments? Questions? Discussion?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:10 pm

thinkdr wrote:Thank you, iambiguous.


Note that in the first item in the References below, the booklet entitled THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS, on page 42, a tool for moral self-analysis is provided. Wouldn't you agree that that tool can also serve as a serious guide for Ethical decision-making?
I think it does.


From page 42:

"To be enlightened is to put people first, things next, and dogmatic ideas last. It is to live by the Hierarchy of Value discovered by Robert S. Hartman, the wise philosopher-scientist. "

Hartman is no longer with us. What I would need then is for someone who shares his frame of mind to discuss this given a particular set of circumstances in which there are conflicting assessments of what it means to put people first, things second and dogmatic ideas last.

In other words, without their own moral and political value judgments becoming dogmatic in turn. After all, to propose a "hierarchy of value" would certainly seem to suggest [to me] going in that direction. Imagine, for example, the hierarchies proposed by a libertarian and a socialist. Or a hedonist and an ascetic.

That is why, as a moral nihilist, I still subscribe to moderation, negotiation and compromise as, for all practical purposes, the best of all possible world. Only, even here, "I" am no less fractured and fragmented. Pulled ambivalently in conflicting directions down in my "hole".

The embodiment of this intellectual contraption:

"If I am always of the opinion that 1] my own values are rooted in dasein and 2] that there are no objective values "I" can reach, then every time I make one particular moral/political leap, I am admitting that I might have gone in the other direction...or that I might just as well have gone in the other direction. Then "I" begins to fracture and fragment to the point there is nothing able to actually keep it all together. At least not with respect to choosing sides morally and politically."

And here all I can do is to take these words out into the world and describe how they are implicated in my own day to day interactions with others.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:01 am

I congratulate you, iambiguous, for your intellectual and moral courage in doing the research and following through, actually reading some of the writing in the booklet.The paragraph you quoted at the outset of your comments was indeed on p. 42; but it was not what I intended as a "tool for decision-making."

The paragraph of which you may have been critical referred to matters discussed at greater length earlier in the document. The applications given in that context were illustrations of the use of the value dimensions. They were only examples, and here they were out of context. Sorry about the confusion; I did not make myself clear enough.

{The value dimensions themselves are rigorously-derived in the first 28 pages of Basic Ethics: a systematic approach.
The entire demonstration there is only Systemic value, and thus worth the least of the three basic dimensions.
Applications of these dimensions to life is worth much more!
And the living of that life, embodying those applications is worth infinitely more!!

Here is another illustration:

I: Dasein, and all it implies to you, and I, and to Heidegger

E: the socio-economic affairs of everyday life

S: systems, theories, ideologies, dogma, creeds and other intellectual
postulations

What I meant to refer to is located in the pdf file at the bottom of p.41 and the top of p. 42 in THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS treatise.
I shall, upon request, reprint that Tool For Ethical Decision-making in a future post for those who for some reason can't or won't do what you did, which is to click on the link and actually look at the booklet.

Thank you again. And thanks in advance to anyone else who is moved to contribute constructively on this thread's topic.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Jan 19, 2020 7:40 pm

thinkdr wrote:I congratulate you, iambiguous, for your intellectual and moral courage in doing the research and following through, actually reading some of the writing in the booklet.The paragraph you quoted at the outset of your comments was indeed on p. 42; but it was not what I intended as a "tool for decision-making."

The paragraph of which you may have been critical referred to matters discussed at greater length earlier in the document. The applications given in that context were illustrations of the use of the value dimensions. They were only examples, and here they were out of context. Sorry about the confusion; I did not make myself clear enough.

{The value dimensions themselves are rigorously-derived in the first 28 pages of Basic Ethics: a systematic approach.
The entire demonstration there is only Systemic value, and thus worth the least of the three basic dimensions.
Applications of these dimensions to life is worth much more!
And the living of that life, embodying those applications is worth infinitely more!!

Here is another illustration:

I: Dasein, and all it implies to you, and I, and to Heidegger

E: the socio-economic affairs of everyday life

S: systems, theories, ideologies, dogma, creeds and other intellectual
postulations

What I meant to refer to is located in the pdf file at the bottom of p.41 and the top of p. 42 in THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS treatise.
I shall, upon request, reprint that Tool For Ethical Decision-making in a future post for those who for some reason can't or won't do what you did, which is to click on the link and actually look at the booklet.

Thank you again. And thanks in advance to anyone else who is moved to contribute constructively on this thread's topic.


Again and again and again and again: this [to me] is just another example of a "general description intellectual contraption". It may or may not be applicable as a guide to ethical decision making.

My own interest however revolves around the extent to which didactic assumptions of this sort are applicable to particular contexts in which human behaviors come into conflict over value judgments. The part where ethics "for all practical purposes" has an actual use value and exchange value.

You note that...

I shall, upon request, reprint that Tool For Ethical Decision-making in a future post for those who for some reason can't or won't do what you did, which is to click on the link and actually look at the booklet.



But: I only chose to read that page in the booklet looking for arguments that do bring premises and conclusions of this sort out into the world that we interact in.

I'm looking for arguments able to convince me that the manner in which I construe "I" in the is/ought world [re dasein, conflicting goods and political economy] is not a reasonable frame of mind.

So, sure, if applied ethics is not what you are interested in yourself, we ought to move on to others.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Tue Jan 21, 2020 9:05 am

I'll tell you what Dasein means to me.

It comes from the German word meaning 'presence.' [Literally, it says ''here be.']
To me it means: BE HERE NOW !!!
Squeeze every drop of meaning out of the present moment.
The past is dead and gone. It is water under the bridge. There is no use brooding over it.
No one I know can see the future. The paradox is that if we give up the need for security, we are secure. We will never leave this world alive. There is no use worrying about the future! Cross a bridge when you come to it. It is all right to make plans now, but don't let that planning rob from the total enjoyment of the present. Husserl calls it 'Intentionality.' Bergson calls it 'compenetration.' Robert S. Hartman speaks of it as 'Intrinsic valuation.' {Those who write a dissertation on what it meant to Heidegger may earn a Ph.D. for a thesis done well.}

Dasein is a focus on the here and now, avoiding getting distracted. It is interacting with the world in which we live. It is believing strongly in goodness - that it will solve every problem. So be good, and thus merit and facilitate these solutions. Goodness when it is mobilized and organized can be very powerful.

Incidentally, what I wrote in the previous posts definitely can be applied to the lived-in world with which we interact! Think about it.

.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Posts: 759
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Wed Jan 22, 2020 8:43 am

Here is an additional guide to Ethical decision-making, one that is to be used especially when an individual is tempted to become an embezzler, or to engage in a questionable business practice, or succumb to a sleazy opportunistic bargain of some sort. In other words, when you are about to corrupt yourself use this tool:

A tool for moral self-analysis

A person of good character will make the following moral analysis with respect to his or her conduct. He or she will say to himself or herself:

With regard to the action I am about to take,
Would it cause harm to anyone? And

Would it withstand public scrutiny?

Is there an alternative action I may pursue that would not give pain to anyone?

How can I create a win/win transaction in this situation?”



...Your views on this topic?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
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Posts: 759
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Wed Jan 22, 2020 7:33 pm

thinkdr wrote: I'll tell you what Dasein means to me.

It comes from the German word meaning 'presence.' [Literally, it says ''here be.']
To me it means: BE HERE NOW !!!
Squeeze every drop of meaning out of the present moment.
The past is dead and gone. It is water under the bridge. There is no use brooding over it.
No one I know can see the future. The paradox is that if we give up the need for security, we are secure. We will never leave this world alive. There is no use worrying about the future! Cross a bridge when you come to it. It is all right to make plans now, but don't let that planning rob from the total enjoyment of the present. Husserl calls it 'Intentionality.' Bergson calls it 'compenetration.' Robert S. Hartman speaks of it as 'Intrinsic valuation.' {Those who write a dissertation on what it meant to Heidegger may earn a Ph.D. for a thesis done well.}


Okay, this is what it means to you. And to them. But, given a particular set of circumstances in which a guide is needed in order to make ethical decisions, how is that meaning translated into an actual reason that propels you to choose this behavior rather than another?

In the manner in which I encompass my own meaning of dasein, "I" here is an existential contraption rooted historically, culturally and interpersonally out in a particular world understood in a particular way.

With respect to a context that revolves around, say, human sexuality, each individual "I" has come to embody his or her own set of experiences out in a particular world. And these experiences go a long way in shaping their moral and political value judgments.

But, taking that into consideration, what then can philosophers ascertain so as to provide us with the most rational guide to ethical decision making.

You will either go there or you won't. Instead, in my view, you choose to stay here:

thinkdr wrote: Dasein is a focus on the here and now, avoiding getting distracted. It is interacting with the world in which we live. It is believing strongly in goodness - that it will solve every problem. So be good, and thus merit and facilitate these solutions. Goodness when it is mobilized and organized can be very powerful.


Another general description intellectual contraption.

thinkdr wrote: Incidentally, what I wrote in the previous posts definitely can be applied to the lived-in world with which we interact! Think about it.


Right, "generally".

But note a specific set of circumstances and describe in some detail that which guides you to make ethical decisions. In such a way that this reflects your own understanding of dasein. In such a way that you are able to articulate why you believe that your way is more reasonable than mine.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:41 am

iambiguous wrote:thinkdr wrote:
Incidentally, what I wrote in the previous posts definitely can be applied to the lived-in world with which we interact! Think about it.


Right, "generally".

But note a specific set of circumstances and describe in some detail that which guides you to make ethical decisions


At this site reached via the following link, the reader will find more than 80 cases where the tools and guides I offer would be very relevant; these guides if employed would have prevented the ethically-questionable behavior, the bad conduct. See the videos here:
https://ethicsunwrapped.utexas.edu/case-studies

Also, this book has many moral dilemmas to consider - which my guides would have solved if only they were used. See
Rushworth M. Kidder, HOW GOOD PEOPLE MAKE TOUGH CHOICES (1995, New York,Fireside Books, Simon & Schuster) ...available from The Institute for Global Ethics.
To see Reviews, scroll down from here: https://www.amazon.com/product-reviews/ ... RY5Z79DXW8


Comments? Questions? Suggestions for enhancing the proposed guides?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
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Posts: 759
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:11 pm

thinkdr wrote:Incidentally, what I wrote in the previous posts definitely can be applied to the lived-in world with which we interact! Think about it.


Right, "generally".

But note a specific set of circumstances and describe in some detail that which guides you to make ethical decisions


thinkdr wrote:At this site reached via the following link, the reader will find more than 80 cases where the tools and guides I offer would be very relevant; these guides if employed would have prevented the ethically-questionable behavior, the bad conduct. See the videos here:
https://ethicsunwrapped.utexas.edu/case-studies


That's what guided them. I want to know what guided you. What in particular influenced you in a context in which your value judgments were challenged by another.

As I note time and again, I am interested in exploring the ethical narratives and the political agendas of others in the manner in which I explore my own here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382

In other words, the manner in which the life that you lived intertwined both experiences, relationships and access to information, knowledge and ideas such that here and now you are predisposed existentially to think one thing rather than another. With me, on that thread, it was in regard to abortion. With you, it can be anything you choose.

Only after exploring the part I ascribe to dasein, does it make sense [to me] to bring the philosophers into it. Is there in fact a way deontologically to take the components of my own moral assessment into account and still manage to arrive at one's moral obligation in regard to an issue like abortion?
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:15 am

iambiguous wrote:
thinkdr wrote:Incidentally, what I wrote in the previous posts definitely can be applied to the lived-in world with which we interact! Think about it.


Right, "generally".


thinkdr wrote:At this site reached via the following link, the reader will find more than 80 cases where the tools and guides I offer would be very relevant; these guides if employed would have prevented the ethically-questionable behavior, the bad conduct. See the videos here:
https://ethicsunwrapped.utexas.edu/case-studies


That's what guided them. I want to know what guided you.


It's not about me !

The Ethical Theory proposed has to stand on its own feet. In recent posts -- in the thread entitled Hardcore Ethics - viewtopic.php?f=1&t=195052&p=2758896#p2758896 - I offer some characteristics of an ethical individual. Those attributes, along with logical reasoning, enable a person to make wise choices ...probably guided by the criteria given in the original post, and the subsequent additional tools.

Merely select a case study, either from the many offered by Rush Kidder in his book, HOW GOOD PEOPLE MAKE TOUGH CHOICES; or choose a case from the Behavioral Ethics site of the Univ. of Texas at Austin, and see what you, as an ethical person,would do in that situation. This assumes that you have acquired the qualities listed in that description of 'an ethical individual.' It assumes that you, personally, now have those features mentioned.
I I hope and trust that assumption is not unwarranted.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
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Posts: 759
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:05 pm

Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Sun Feb 02, 2020 8:40 pm

thinkdr wrote:
It's not about me !

The Ethical Theory proposed has to stand on its own feet. In recent posts -- in the thread entitled Hardcore Ethics - viewtopic.php?f=1&t=195052&p=2758896#p2758896 - I offer some characteristics of an ethical individual. Those attributes, along with logical reasoning, enable a person to make wise choices ...probably guided by the criteria given in the original post, and the subsequent additional tools.

Merely select a case study, either from the many offered by Rush Kidder in his book, HOW GOOD PEOPLE MAKE TOUGH CHOICES; or choose a case from the Behavioral Ethics site of the Univ. of Texas at Austin, and see what you, as an ethical person,would do in that situation. This assumes that you have acquired the qualities listed in that description of 'an ethical individual.' It assumes that you, personally, now have those features mentioned.
I I hope and trust that assumption is not unwarranted.


Sorry, but this sort of thing is just not what I am interested in. Instead, my interest revolves around taking the theoretical "in general" conclusions that the people above make out into the world of actual human interactions. A description and exploration of human interactions in which behaviors come into conflict as a result of conflicting value judgments.

It could be a discussion of abortion, or Trump's Wall, or Brexit or homosexuality or separation of church and state or the role of government or any other particular context in which actual flesh and blood human beings move beyond technical philosophical arguments and bring the definitions and the meaning derived from them out into the world of conflicting goods. The stuff we are bombarded with day in and day out on the various news media.

And my own bottom line here is that an "ethical person" is basically an existential contraption construction -- "I" -- predisposed to embrace one rather than another set of political prejudices derived more from the life that he or she lives than from anything they might garner from say, this: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/morality-definition/

But that's just me.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Feb 02, 2020 10:10 pm

We are both interested in actual human interaction. I, for one, do not want to settle for a description of the chaos and confusion that exists now.

Rather, I would like to focus on how, and in what way, by using the knowledge we can gain from the sciences, we can make the transition to moral clarity and to the setting of wise priorities.

That is why I am grateful that a profound philosopher, Robert S. Hartman (1910-1973) came along. He devised Formal Axiology. He explained clearly value formation, and how the human mind organizes its values. He discovered the existential Hierarchy of Values that was there in the universe all the while but was just not noticed nor appreciated. He brought that HOV to light.

With the aid of that logical-ordering of priorities people can know what goals to work toward, what to aim for, what stands to take, which way to go. That's where The Guides to better-decision-making come in: they are tools in a toolchest; so that when an issue such as abortion arises one knows what's important, viz., caring about the woman's feelings. Caring, not labels. Love, not ideology.

Maybe, at this point, it is helpful to re-read the original post in this thread, realizing that the Intrinsic considerations are more valuable to us human beings than are the Extrinsic, or the Systemic. Recall the formula: I > E > S.

Comments? Questions?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:43 pm

thinkdr wrote: We are both interested in actual human interaction. I, for one, do not want to settle for a description of the chaos and confusion that exists now.

Rather, I would like to focus on how, and in what way, by using the knowledge we can gain from the sciences, we can make the transition to moral clarity and to the setting of wise priorities.


Knowledge, okay. But, given a particular context in which there are conflicting goods, what knowledge is there [scientific or philosophical] that produces the sort of moral clarity and list of priorities able to obviate the components of my own considerably more "fractured and fragmented" moral philosophy: nihilism.

But then this:

thinkdr wrote: That is why I am grateful that a profound philosopher, Robert S. Hartman (1910-1973) came along. He devised Formal Axiology. He explained clearly value formation, and how the human mind organizes its values. He discovered the existential Hierarchy of Values that was there in the universe all the while but was just not noticed nor appreciated. He brought that HOV to light.

With the aid of that logical-ordering of priorities people can know what goals to work toward, what to aim for, what stands to take, which way to go. That's where The Guides to better-decision-making come in: they are tools in a toolchest; so that when an issue such as abortion arises one knows what's important, viz., caring about the woman's feelings. Caring, not labels. Love, not ideology.


From my frame of mind, yet another "general description intellectual contraption". An abstract assessment those embracing utterly conflicting moral and political and philosophical assumptions can accept --- but only by way of having a use value and an exchange value that sustains just their own desired "rules of behavior". Predicated on their own moral and political prejudices.

Again, we will either settle in on a set of circumstances in which to explore our respective "world of words" or we are wasting each other's time.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sat Feb 08, 2020 9:25 am

iambiguous wrote:
thinkdr wrote: We are both interested in actual human interaction. I, for one, do not want to settle for a description of the chaos and confusion that exists now.

Rather, I would like to focus on how, and in what way, by using the knowledge we can gain from the sciences, we can make the transition to moral clarity and to the setting of wise priorities.


Knowledge, okay. But, given a particular context ...what knowledge is there ....?

But then this:

thinkdr wrote: That is why I am grateful that a profound philosopher, Robert S. Hartman (1910-1973) came along. He devised Formal Axiology. He explained clearly value formation, and how the human mind organizes its values. He discovered the existential Hierarchy of Values that was there in the universe all the while but was just not noticed nor appreciated. He brought that HOV to light.

With the aid of that logical-ordering of priorities people can know what goals to work toward, what to aim for, what stands to take, which way to go. That's where The Guides to better-decision-making come in: they are tools in a toolchest; so that when an issue such as abortion arises one knows what's important, viz., caring about the woman's feelings. Caring, not labels. Love, not ideology.


From my frame of mind, ...an abstract assessment those [who have] utterly conflicting moral and political and philosophical assumptions can accept --- but only by way of having a use value....


Wouldn't that acceptance be a good outcome? I should think so. Yet one notes here more "buts" than a ram in heat.

I don't want to waste anyone's time. I gave an issue - namely, abortion - and showed how I would deal with it.

{ Ethics teaches that autonomy and individuality are values that everyone is entitled to, and should have. Thus a woman has a right to decide on how her body is used. Intelligent people distinguish between a fetus and a human individual with a unique personality. Such an individual is valued Intrinsically by those who are ethical. In contrast, a growth or a cluster of cells, is valued Systemically by most people who know their values. Recall that Intrinsic valuation is infinitely-more-valuable to us human beings than is Systemic valuation. I > S.}

Furthermore, I gave you more than eighty issues and asked you to select one, say, one where there was a conflict between two positive values - such as loyalty versus community, for example - and you declined to select one of those case-studies for me to which to apply my analysis. {Rush Kidder's book had plenty of these excellent moral dilemmas!]

Hence, for these reasons I get the impression that a certain nihilist does not want to learn the knowledge about which he expresses curiosity; for if he did, he would read up on Robert Hartman's contribution, or he would study carefully some of the literature to which links are supplied below.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:06 pm

thinkdr wrote: Ethics teaches that autonomy and individuality are values that everyone is entitled to, and should have. Thus a woman has a right to decide on how her body is used. Intelligent people distinguish between a fetus and a human individual with a unique personality. Such an individual is valued Intrinsically by those who are ethical. In contrast, a growth or a cluster of cells, is valued Systemically by most people who know their values.


This is a classic example of someone making certain political assumptions about abortion and then distinguishing between what intelligent people are obligated to think in regard to an unwanted pregnancy and what unintelligent people think instead. One of us/one of them.

Like those on the other side are not able to articulate their own rendition of this relationship in defending the right of the unborn baby to live. Or in defending their own set of assumptions in regard to when human life begins -- from the point of conception on.

thinkdr wrote: Recall that Intrinsic valuation is infinitely-more-valuable to us human beings than is Systemic valuation.


Recall that obtuse intellectual contraptions like this are precisely what I aim to avoid in regard to our reactions to any particular set of circumstances in which a woman is pregnant and does not want to be.

thinkdr wrote: Furthermore, I gave you more than eighty issues and asked you to select one, say, one where there was a conflict between two positive values - such as loyalty versus community, for example - and you declined to select one of those case-studies for me to which to apply my analysis. {Rush Kidder's book had plenty of these excellent moral dilemmas!]


That's not where I focus my argument though. My aim is to explore your "analysis" -- anyone's analysis -- as an existential contraption rooted in dasein. In any particular context involving a conflict between the individual and the community, there are going to be values/loyalties in conflict. Take conscription for example: https://connectusfund.org/10-meaningful ... ry-service

My argument suggests that any particular individual will derive his or her values more from the sequence of experiences in his or her life [out in a particular world historically, culturally and experientially] rather than as an ethicist able to actually pin down [philosophically or otherwise] one's moral obligation here.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
User avatar
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:29 am

iambiguous wrote:
thinkdr wrote: Ethics teaches that autonomy and individuality are values that everyone is entitled to, and should have. Thus a woman has a right to decide on how her body is used. Intelligent people distinguish between a fetus and a human individual with a unique personality. Such an individual is valued Intrinsically by those who are ethical. In contrast, a growth or a cluster of cells, is valued Systemically by most people who know their values.


This is a classic example of someone making certain political assumptions about abortion and then distinguishing between what intelligent people are obligated to think in regard to an unwanted pregnancy and what unintelligent people think instead. One of us/one of them.

"Classic", eh? Thank you for the compliment. However, I said nothing about "obligation. Thoughts are free. Nowadays a pill - if access to it were readily available - even if one is poor and/or uneducated - would largely obviate the 'abortion dilemma, making the entire discussion mostly irrelevant.

thinkdr wrote: Recall that Intrinsic valuation is infinitely-more-valuable to us human beings than is Systemic valuation.


You call that passage "obtuse" only because you haven't done your homework, i.e., the research to learn why that is so.
And you seem to be putting down conceptual analysis even though you are at a site where people love wisdom, love Philosophy, which often does indulge in intellectual reasoning.
This is okay, for you are, in effect, agreeing with Hartman that Systemic Value is worth the least among the basic value dimensions.


thinkdr wrote: Furthermore, I gave you more than eighty issues and asked you to select one, say, one where there was a conflict between two positive values - such as loyalty versus community, for example - and you declined to select one of those case-studies for me to which to apply my analysis. {Rush Kidder's book had plenty of these excellent moral dilemmas!]


That's not where I focus my argument though. My aim is to explore your "analysis" -- anyone's analysis -- as an existential contraption rooted in dasein. In any particular context involving a conflict between the individual and the community, there are going to be values/loyalties in conflict. Take conscription for example: https://connectusfund.org/10-meaningful ... ry-service

Some folks want "to swim in the pros and cons" and never take a stand. Ethics, the discipline, teaches us to stand up for what is right, and to reject what is wrong. That a woman shall treasure her autonomy, and her individuality (and thus not be a conformist) is her right. I am glad to have done time for being a conscientious objector to war; I met some very-interesting people in the detention camp for political prisoners (among others being held.)


My argument suggests that any particular individual will derive his or her values more from the sequence of experiences in his or her life [out in a particular world historically, culturally and experientially] rather than as an ethicist able to actually pin down [philosophically or otherwise] one's moral obligation here.


You are here agreeing with me that people learn ethics more often by example rather than by the deduction of a conclusion from a logical, well-reasoned argument. They see conduct by someone they respect, or love, and they copy it. Or, as R. S. Hartman, the philosopher, would put it: I-Value [Intrinsic valuation] is greater than (ttakes priority over) E-value [Extrinsic valuation - or empirical, pragmatic considerations.]
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:17 pm

thinkdr wrote: Ethics teaches that autonomy and individuality are values that everyone is entitled to, and should have. Thus a woman has a right to decide on how her body is used. Intelligent people distinguish between a fetus and a human individual with a unique personality. Such an individual is valued Intrinsically by those who are ethical. In contrast, a growth or a cluster of cells, is valued Systemically by most people who know their values.


iambiguous wrote: This is a classic example of someone making certain political assumptions about abortion and then distinguishing between what intelligent people are obligated to think in regard to an unwanted pregnancy and what unintelligent people think instead. One of us/one of them.


thinkdr wrote:"Classic", eh? Thank you for the compliment. However, I said nothing about "obligation. Thoughts are free. Nowadays a pill - if access to it were readily available - even if one is poor and/or uneducated - would largely obviate the 'abortion dilemma, making the entire discussion mostly irrelevant


I have no clear idea how this point is related to my point in regard to the morality of abortion as an example of what I construe to be conflicting goods.

thinkdr wrote: Furthermore, I gave you more than eighty issues and asked you to select one, say, one where there was a conflict between two positive values - such as loyalty versus community, for example - and you declined to select one of those case-studies for me to which to apply my analysis. {Rush Kidder's book had plenty of these excellent moral dilemmas!]


iambiguous wrote: That's not where I focus my argument though. My aim is to explore your "analysis" -- anyone's analysis -- as an existential contraption rooted in dasein. In any particular context involving a conflict between the individual and the community, there are going to be values/loyalties in conflict. Take conscription for example: https://connectusfund.org/10-meaningful ... ry-service


thinkdr wrote: Some folks want "to swim in the pros and cons" and never take a stand. Ethics, the discipline, teaches us to stand up for what is right, and to reject what is wrong. That a woman shall treasure her autonomy, and her individuality (and thus not be a conformist) is her right. I am glad to have done time for being a conscientious objector to war; I met some very-interesting people in the detention camp for political prisoners (among others being held.)


Note to others:

You tell me how his point here is related to the point I make above it. He merely asserts that if people approach ethics as a "discipline" it will teach them to "stand up for what is right". And, in regard to conscription, he did the right thing because it was in sync with his own disciplined ethics. How is that not tautological?

iambiguous wrote: My argument suggests that any particular individual will derive his or her values more from the sequence of experiences in his or her life [out in a particular world historically, culturally and experientially] rather than as an ethicist able to actually pin down [philosophically or otherwise] one's moral obligation here.


thinkdr wrote: You are here agreeing with me that people learn ethics more often by example rather than by the deduction of a conclusion from a logical, well-reasoned argument. They see conduct by someone they respect, or love, and they copy it. Or, as R. S. Hartman, the philosopher, would put it: I-Value [Intrinsic valuation] is greater than (ttakes priority over) E-value [Extrinsic valuation - or empirical, pragmatic considerations.]


I'm not at all certain that you agree with yourself here. From my frame of mind, you don't seem to be arguing that "people learn ethics more often by example", but rather through a disciplined understanding of ethics itself garnered from the books you read.

Whereas I focus more on "I" here as an existential contraption out in a particular world understood from a particular point of view derived circumstantially from dasein.

Thus it depends on who someone comes to respect and love and copy in a particular historical, cultural and experiential context. Accepting that in a world of contingency, chance and change, new experiences, relationships and access to ideas can change their minds about any number of things.

That's why, in regard to abortion, my interest in ethics revolves around the points I raise on this thread: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382

You will either go there yourself in regard to your own value judgments here or attempt further to explain to me how only a disciplined understanding of ethics led you to what I construe to be the political prejudices you take in regard to abortion here and now.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sat Feb 15, 2020 9:32 am

This thread was created to compatibly resonate with those who feel as I do that Ethics has the potential to be treated scientifically, and who appreciate having some reliable guides to making an Ethical decision.

I am not here to dissuade the moral nihilists from their ideology, nor to convert the heathen, nor anything along that line.

Since Moral Psychology is currently the experimental branch of ethics, and the new paradigm for Ethics can serve as the theoretical branch; in that sense Ethics already is a science. [Of course there will always be room for a philosophy of ethical science.]
The proposed new paradigm - "A Unified Theory of Ethics" - is highly-tentative, is in flux, is in the process of being created and continuously upgraded. It is a cooperative project motivated and researched by those who would like to see ethics become even-more scientific.

I read your thread, iambiguous, on ""Moral Philosophy in the Lives...," and wonder if what you said to Ecmandu might properly be applied to yourself. Recall you words:
Okay, kid, I challenge you to beat it!"


I wouldn't say that (even though to someone of my age you are just a kid) since I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings by giving them a parental command {what Dr. Eric Berne would call "a crossed transaction."}

In other words, the suggestion is: If you are not aware (that a logical theory may serve as a frame-of-reference which when applied to data helps to organize and explain that data; and that this is the way science works) and thus do not see how the new paradigm explains and clarifies life as lived in the moral realm, then please do write some more of YOUR OWN threads, and avoid hijacking this one. Okay?

You said more than once that your interests lie somewhere else than in learning how a model can be applied to offering some useful guides to making ethical decisions. So please go back to seeing John and Mary's both sides - and by inference all sides of every question - and leave us to do our own thing.
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby Ecmandu » Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:48 pm

Thinkdr,

I think your name is arrogant. That’s besides the point.

The whole of ethics can be summarized in one short phrase:

Don’t violate anyone’s consent.

Of the Ten Commandments, there should only be one:

Don’t violate anyone’s consent.

Now you know who the false gods are.
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby surreptitious75 » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:24 am

Do not do unto others what you would not have them do unto you / The Silver Rule

Do unto others what you would have them do unto you / The Golden Rule

Avoid harming human beings as much as possible / surreptitious Rule

Avoid consent violation / Ecmandu Rule

All four saying the same thing basically
A MIND IS LIKE A PARACHUTE : IT DOES NOT WORK UNLESS IT IS OPEN
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:03 am

surreptitious75 wrote:Do not do unto others what you would not have them do unto you / The Silver Rule

Do unto others what you would have them do unto you / The Golden Rule

Avoid harming human beings as much as possible / surreptitious Rule

Avoid consent violation / Ecmandu Rule

All four saying the same thing basically

Yes, they are saying basically the same thing. Thank you for your contribution, surreptitious.

As to Ecmandu's comment about my nickname: I am a Doctor of Philosophy, and I have been known to think once in a while ....even my wife would affirm that. :wink:
The important thing is that I have self-respect and that I respect you.
And - as noted before - this project is not about me. It's about all of us getting closer to living in an ethical world; and gaining for each and all a Quality Life.


How about the rest of you Forum participants? Do you believe that the above Principles have been sufficient to keep everyone ethical?

In the STRUCTURE booklet, on pp. 27-28, a few more moral Principles are listed. The booklet makes the case that the more of these Principles we live by, the more moral we are (the higher, so to speak, is our 'morality score.')
Morality, it argues, is a concept that expresses our moral development, or our stage of evolution.

What do you think?
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby thinkdr » Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:26 pm

surreptitious75 got me to thinking and reflecting on the subject.

Perhaps the whole program can be summed up in 7 imperative words:

Be kind. Do no harm. Grow morally.


If one wants to write about Ethics, consider that the structure of it can be simplified into these three parts.

I) Being kind.

II) Doing no harm.

III) Growing morally.

The Golden Rule and its variants would be discussed in volume one. This guide to Ethical decision-making suggests that you treat others as you would want to be treated.
Upon each encounter or interaction with others, one is to ask oneself: How can I create value here and now so that each of us can be a winner!? Peter Demerest has titled this "The Central Question of Life."
Also in that section would be an explanation of how kindness can be immoderate:overdone. Good manners, however, are always in style. In Oriental cultures people bow, nod their heads, as a sign of respect when encountering one another. It helps to hold the culture together.
This part of the book would also discuss in depth Humility; and Moral Courage (as exhibited by 'whistle-blowers' who want to keep their jobs but who are moved by their conscieence to expose wrong-doing and corruption.)

What it means in practice to avoid harming, and to avoid being offensive, would be the content of the second volume or subsection of the book.

And what are the good and wise Moral Principles to live by would be found in third part of the treatise. The more of these Principles with which an individual complies, the more he or she is growing morally.

These concepts mentioned above also comprise the New Paradigm for Ethics - and Hardcore Ethics.


Your views on any of this are welcome!
:idea: For further reading and insight into the topics of Ethics check out these links, and thereby add to your reading enjoyment

THE STRUCTURE OF ETHICS
[NEW] :!:
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/TH ... ETHICS.pdf


THE BREAKTHROUGH - We Can Get Along After All (2018)
http://myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BREAKT ... %20all.pdf

LIVING WELL: how ethics helps us flourish
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/LI ... ourish.pdf


BASIC ETHICS: a systematic approach
http://www.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/BASIC%20ETHICS.pdf


ETHICAL ADVENTURES http://wadeharvey.myqol.com/wadeharvey/PDFs/ETHICAL%20ADVENTURES.pdf

When you search Bing for the following pdf selection you may wish to start with page 20 in order to skip the technicalities:
Marvin C. Katz - ETHICS: A College Course
thinkdr
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Re: A Guide to Ethical Decision-making

Postby iambiguous » Thu Feb 20, 2020 9:13 pm

thinkdr wrote:This thread was created to compatibly resonate with those who feel as I do that Ethics has the potential to be treated scientifically, and who appreciate having some reliable guides to making an Ethical decision.

I am not here to dissuade the moral nihilists from their ideology, nor to convert the heathen, nor anything along that line.


Okay, fair enough.

Now, if you [or anyone here] are inclined to bring the conclusions you come to regarding Ethics being treated scientifically out into the world of actual human interactions confronting conflicting goods in a particular sets of circumstances, please keep me in mind.

I have ways of challenging such conclusions that you may not have thought all the way through.
Objectivists: Like shooting fish in a barrel!

He was like a man who wanted to change all; and could not; so burned with his impotence; and had only me, an infinitely small microcosm to convert or detest. John Fowles

Start here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=176529
Then here: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=185296
And here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=194382
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