Hallucination

ted.com/talks/Oliver_sacks_what_ … minds.html.

Mine are very vivid. The usually occur when I’m just awakening. In these hallucinations I see my real physical surroundings, not a dreamscape. In one instance someone called my name. In another, which has happened ywice, a hand grasps mine. It has no arm. In a third instance I saw the Pac Man ghost enlarged on the door to the bedroom.

Sacks explans this phenomenon and assures us who experience it that we are not crazy.

[quote=“Ierrellus”]
http://ted.com/talks/Oliver_sacks_what_hallucination_reveals_about_our_minds.html

Sounds like hypnopompic phenomena, and yes they are normal. If you have them at lunch, they may not be.

Hi, Moreno
Please explain “hypnopompic phenomena”. Sacks finds hallucinations common in temporal lobe epilepsy. His recent take is that they have something to do with vision and hearing impairment. He tells of one lady who got a vivid image of Kermit the Frog, although she never watched Sesame Street. He notes that cartoon hallucinations are common and vivid, such as my PacMan ghost. My counselor noted that hallucinations can be a result of sleep deprivation. Have you experienced hallucinastion?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnopompic

Sure you can have hallucinations with epilepsy, but hallucinations does not mean there is epilepsy, or damage of any kind, or mental image.

Sure, I have had hallucinations. Though that term is so laden, I’d prefer to say that I saw things that were not there in the way the walls of the room were.

But in the early waking up phase of the day it is nto strange to see stuff.

Thanks, Moreno, for the references.
Sacks seems mostly concerned with The Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS)–
wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bonnet_syndrome.
In this thread I hope to find experiences with hallucination that fit a wide range of diagnoses. Maybe we can outline these under headings of brain disorders and everyday, normal occurences that show no brain disorders.

Hallucination as a concept carries with it the idea that there are really two possibilities. Seeing objects that are there that other people would see and that could be touched and otherwise verified AND seeing things that are not there and being wrong, confused, possibly mentally ill or in some kind of pathological physical state where one hallucinates. But there are a whole host of other possibilities. Just as dreams can have symbolic meaning, so can visions. They may be real in another sense. I don’t want to go to far into this because it does not seem to be your intention for the thread, but I just want to put the issue on the table.

Hallucination as a concept carries with it the idea that there are really two possibilities. Seeing objects that are there that other people would see and that could be touched and otherwise verified AND seeing things that are not there and being wrong, confused, possibly mentally ill or in some kind of pathological physical state where one hallucinates. But there are a whole host of other possibilities. Just as dreams can have symbolic meaning, so can visions. They may be real in another sense. I don’t want to go to far into this because it does not seem to be your intention for the thread, but I just want to put the issue on the table.[/quote
(Ierrellus response, not Moreno’s)–The Scientific American article given in your mind pops thread suggests that mind pops evolve into hallucination. Thus my thread is probabably redundant. If so, I’ll happily close my thread.

Hi Ierrellus,

When we see anything while sleeping, we use to call it a dream. No confusion.

But, when we use to see dream in awaken state, it is hallunation.

If you can recall it completely and correctly, these phenomenoa use to happen in semi-conscious state. There is a divinding line between sleeping and awakening. Hallunations use to occur exactly during that precise state, unless you have not taken any drug.

When it completes, one gets a feeling as he is just awake from the sleep, while he is not slept. Sometimes, it also appears that one has returend from any distant place.

Although, it happens automatically, but it also can be done by force and practice.

Actually, this phenomenon is not properly perceived by the west as they consider it some sort of mental illness but it is not.

Eastern mythologies are well aware of this as it is the first threshold of meditation and they do it willingly. It is called TANDRA (meditative semi-consciousness) or YOG-NIDRA (meditative sleep) in Hindu mythologies. In Sufism (Islam), they call it NAZIR (showing example) and BASHARAT (which is shown to human forcefully).

So, this is to say that there is nothing unusual in it and no need to worry about. These do not happen often. Many of us use to experience these.

But,if all this starts to happen regularly then, one must pay attention to it as an important massage.

with love,
sanjay

Thanks, Sanjay, especially for the remarks on Eastern philosophies. The West has gone the way of left brain analytics and continues to see such phenomenon as hallucination as aberation.

I have been trying to control my visions which I consider are toned down hallucinations which are not physically seen but are mentally seen. This is very hard, because my mind has a mind of its own. Now that may not sound like it makes sense, but my mind is fractured. It’s full of lots of stuff. I’m surprised it works as well as it does. I think it will take me a long time to gain small amounts of control.

Thanks Dan,
What part of your psyche would you consider to be the control mechanism?

Nearly everyone hallucinates…