Hume, Kant, Causality, and Induction

“Anything and everything that is consistent and coherent within a comprehensive ontology is necessarily true”, yes, but nonetheless the question is: is it true because of your thoughts (subjectively true) or because of reality (objectively true) or because of all (subjectively and objectively true).

“As long as there are conscious beings, there is truth.” Do you mean that truth is only in the consciousness? If so, then, please, answer the following two questions:
A) Is the consciousness true?
B) If yes: Is consciousness subjectively true (thus for one’s consciousness) or objectively true (thus for the consciousness[es] of all, for any and every consciousness)?

“There is only “reality” outside.” This sentence means or should mean that the objective world is true and called “reality”, but it doesn’t say anything about the inside, about the (brains of the) subjects, the truth of them.

“Truth is the accurate internal map inside a mind.” This sentence says something about the inside, about the (brains of the) subjects, but it doesn’t say anything about the outside, the so-called “realitiy” or “world”, the truth of them. The underlined word “accurate” does not prove that the internal map maps the outside realitiy. So Kant war right.

“As long as there are conscious beings, there is truth.” This sentence underlines what I said, but does also not answer the question where the truth is represented: only in the consciousness of one (the subject), only in the world (the object), or in both. If one says that “there is only truth in the (brains of the) subjects”, then one does not say whether there is also truth outside of the (brains of the) subjects, whether the brains are true or not, and, if (brains of the) subjects are not true, whether there is truth outside of them, and, if the (brains of the) subjects are true, whether they are only subjectively true, or only obejectively true, or both subjectively and objectively true.


In summation: Kant was right.