State Education Law Suit

I am busy editing the HeartStart Homeschool manual (outline below)
Before publishing it there is a serious legal issue that needs to be resolved
I am contemplating filing a law suit at our local county court in Nevada
It seems pretty obvious that it must go all the way to the Supreme Court for a final ruling
Does any member of this forum have qualification on Constitutional Law
to provide basic procedural advise?

Legalities

Nevada State Education Law

Parents who decide to home school their children may only do so if they agree to the following:State education regulations.

180 days per year of compulsory text-book instruction .

Instruction must be via State prescribed textbook syllabus from kindergarten onwards

Students must take State-supervised examinations

Home school parents must register monthly reports on academic progress and allow State officials spot inspections in the home in order to ascertain that State education regulations are obeyed

The Global Stewardship Foundation, a non-profit corporation registered in the State of Nevada in 1994, sponsor of the HeartStart Home School Dual Brain Education Program respectfully argues that State regulations on compulsory school attendance,including the teaching restrictions placed on parents who wish to home school their children are unconstitutional and therefore illegal.

Our Foundation is deeply concerned with the legal, moral and psychological implications when State Education Laws prematurely and artificially interfere with and influence infant/child emotional and mental development

We are equally concerned that these Laws also prematurely and adversely affect healthy parent/child relationships.

Beyond the disruptive effect of interrupting the essential process of family bonding prior to puberty, the attendant artificiality of Stare-mandated compulsory exposure to prescribed textbook instruction, prematurely influencing the infant/child psyche, for as much as six to eight hours a day, long before the child has developed the intellectual ability to distinguish the difference between systematic mental indoctrination and conscious choice, strips away from the Child of the State its basic human right of independent self-determination.

It is our Foundation’s contention that daily compulsory textbook-based instruction, when it is prematurely imposed on the child psyche for a decade or more, especially when confined to a desk or inside crowded classrooms, artificially inhibits the natural playful development and expression of the child’s potential creative genius.

We appreciate that there was no premeditated decision by the State to deliberately damage basic family values for its own economic advantage. We seek educational change not compensation.

We realize that the current politically mandated education regulations are historically based on a national schooling concept designed and influenced five generations ago by the economic climate of that time, when the industrial revolution shifted employment opportunity from the farm and family workshop to the corporate mass production line.

We contend that the legislation of State-controlled child education regulations was morally corrupt and unconstitutional from the start and were only tacitly agreed to by the parents of the country due the economic expediencies of that era of nation-building.

At that time there was no precedent regarding the long term emotional and intellectual limitations of a prescribed compulsory mass education system. that prematurely took the nation’s children out of the home and away from parental influence, in order to focus on producing a literate work force with a basic grasp of science and technology.

There was no way then of evaluating not only on the effect on the individual child, but also on the collective consciousness of the nation as well.

It is our Foundation’s opinion that the continuation of this antiquated politically-instituted and State-controlled child education system which, after five generations of implementation, is now so deeply self-indoctrinated by its own set policy, to effectively decide on how to best administer the education of the nation’s children.

Times have changed. The industrial revolution is long over.
The nation is built. Globalization is the new economic and social imperative. A new educational philosophy has to be instituted that can meet with these globally-expanded demands.

It is agreed that a common set of educational standards,with literacy, mathematics and science as an essential aspect of the teaching curriculum needs to be maintained

For the reasons stated above it is our Foundation’s contention that it is only the guardian parent and not the State who has the natural right to freely design the educational syllabus which will determine developmental progress and future state of the child’s adult psyche.

I’m not a lawyer if that’s what you’re asking, but filing shit’s usually pretty easy.

Basically, all you want to do is look up the Rules of Civil Procedure for your State and just follow that to a T because the smallest deviation could result in your case getting tossed. Also, make sure to check at the County Court, or website for the County Court to make sure there are no Local Rules (Rules that apply only to that Court) that could fuck you up.

For example, in Belmont County, Ohio, a friend of mine had a Civil Case dismissed once because the Defense filed a Motion to Dismiss and his Attorney (From out-of-state but licensed in Ohio) answered the Motion to Dismiss 27 days later. Pursuant to the Ohio Rules of Civil Procedure, that’s perfectly fine because he has thirty days to do that, however, there’s a Belmont County Local Rule, 6.2 I think, which states that the Answer had to be submitted within fourteen days unless the Judge specificially rules otherwise or grants an extension.

The Motion to Dismiss got ruled upon in the Defendant’s favor by default because the Plaintiff technically failed to respond. My friend had a pretty legitimate case, so he attempted to appeal the decision, but the Court of Appeals didn’t reverse and remand it to the County Court of Common Pleas because to do so would be essentially to Rule that a County cannot adopt Local Rules.

See, if my friend’s attorney would have requested more time to complete the Answer, the Court would have to grant it because the County Court can’t refuse to allow the amount of time that the State allows to do something anyway, but the problem is he didn’t request an extension of time. As a result, the Local Rule was violated and the Court pretty much did the only thing it could.

So, yeah, that’s the kind of shit you have to watch out for.

As an aside, (with all due respect) I disagree with your position in its entirety. Educators have to attend classes simply to learn how to be educators, in fact, the majority of the time you spend in College if you go to become a teacher is trying to learn about child psychology and how to teach kids stuff, and actually slightly less about the subject that you are to teach.

A parent is not a trained educator, a parent is a parent. I’m not trying to take anything away from being a parent, (especially given that I’m a parent myself) but the point is I’m not trained properly on how to make my kid understand Algebra, Composition, or anything else for that matter. That doesn’t mean that I will necessarily fail to teach him anything, but maybe I’ll fail to teach him the right things which is exactly why they give the parents a curriculum, of sorts. It makes perfect sense anyway, because home-schooling is essentially a function of the State in the first place, at least I believe it falls under the remit of the public education system.

I can tell you one other thing. Without the State’s curriculum and textbooks, my kid’s not learning science, it’s just not going to happen. I breezed through the minimum required science in HS with, “C’s,” and I breezed through the minimum required Science in College with, “D’s,” despite the fact that I’m straight A’s in any other subject. My wife doesn’t know shit about science either, so how are we going to teach him about science without some help?

So, we homeschool him without the required assistance of the State and without doing that which is required to be done by the State and what happens when he kicks ass all over the SAT’s but gets to College and he can’t even come close to passing Biology 101?

You’re going to need lawyers.

And honestly, I doubt you’ll win. The state institution will never, ever allow you to “homeschool” children. The state government actually owns your children these days, what they think, believe, and feel. The government wants to ‘destroy’ threats like you, who refuse to obey government indoctrination. For example, if you teach your children that being straight is “right” and being gay is “wrong” then they will label you a terrorist and refuse to listen to your education proposals/reforms.

So essentially you are arguing that you as a parent owns the “right” to educate your own children. Of course you won’t win against the government; they believe they own your children, not you. This is how they have legal permission to stuff all kinds of liberal bullshit into their heads beginning in kindergarten.

We have our national philosophy turned back to front
we have been separated as individuals
and indoctrinated via its education system
into serving the industrial demands
of a Capitalist Economy
more focused on corporate stock prices
than on an education that should be re-designed
by the people
for the people
in order to more efficiently employ ALL the people
to their full potential
and thereby accomplish what all democratic governments are supposed to do
serve the needs of the majority of it’s people

must we really keep on truckin
indoctrinating our children with pie in the sky capitalist ideology
manipulated by a tiny minority of influential businessmen
with armed force at their disposal
from cradle to grave?

it is not paper money that makes the wealthy
more wealthy
even as they take the sun at Cannes
its is in leaving behind at home
all those millions of fellow citizens
trained by the State for five generations
to remain as servers
busy as ants and bees
building up the value of the elite’s private profit

The advantaged
take full advantage
of our genetically inherited work-ethic and conscientious craftsman skills
a two million year long investment
in the gradual evolution of human survival technologies
and social developmental
earned and paid for in full in blood and sweat
by the creative instincts and hard labor
of a hundred thousand generations of ancestors
and keep us harnessed in this day and age
at minimum wage
to the mass production line
mass producing profits
that fill the pockets of the few
with none of us to determine
or realize our own creative gifts
freely enjoying our true human potential

Children are not machines that can be perfectly understood. Two kinds of complexities have to be taken into account.

First, our understanding of the learning process is far from perfect. In fact, educational theories in fashion keep shifting, indicating the immature state of this “science”. Second, children are different from each other. A teacher can, at best, aim for the most generally effective method of instruction, rather than customize that method to individual children. A teacher is limited both by his need to address many children at once, and by his limited ability to get to know individual children.

Beyond the limitations of an idealized teacher, we have to take into account that teacher’s motivation and interest are limited and inconsistent. Teacher accountability is very limited (in large part due to teacher unions). At best, accountability hold teachers to maximize those limited metrics of success chosen by the state. Those metrics may not necessarily match either the desire of parents or the good of the child.

To summarize:

  1. Educational science is far from exact
  2. Children are different, while teachers have to aim for average
  3. Children are different, and the teacher doesn’t know the child as well as a parent
  4. Teachers are typically less motivated than parents
  5. Teachers are motivated to meet goals which are not necessarily for the best interest of the child.
  6. Parents know their children, and care about their children more than teachers, not to mention politicians.

Public Education used to be promoted as a means for allowing all students to achieve a certain minimal level of education regardless of means. It now seems like it has been transformed into becoming the prerogative of the State.

I hope that attitude can be successfully attacked on Constitutional grounds.

How about getting a tutor? Or buying a private text book? Or having either you or your wife try to study science to your kid’s required level? Or having your child (I have no idea what age they are) try to study on their own, using resources freely available on the Internet? Or, if your child has no interest in science (as you and your wife seem not to), forgoing their science education? Clearly, both you and your wife are happily functioning and productive members of society without knowing much science. Who says your child needs to know more?

Find him a college that doesn’t require Biology 101. Why does an English major need to know Biology? Or perhaps he can breeze through with a “D” like his father? Or, as I mentioned before, you get assistance from a private source?

Why do you implicitly assume that without State assistance you are on your own?

I don’t want to argue with you, YOU’LL fuck me up…

(Resigned Sigh)

Okay, I guess I’ll try.

I agree with your position that children are not machines that can be perfectly understood, but to the same extent, we do not necessarily have a perfect understanding of the working of the brain. That having been said, a neurologist understands the workings of the brain better than a construction worker, nobody is going to be perfect when it comes to curing the ailments of dogs, but a veterinarian has a better shot at doing a respectable job than an accountant.

That’s the point, here. A properly trained educator has (at least) a reasonable chance of properly educating a child, and I’m not saying that there is no parent that can properly educate a child, I’m merely saying that some parents can not.

One should also keep in mind that in many cases the High School Diploma is granted by the State, or sometimes even the specific school district, so certainly they should have some influence as to whether or not they will grant a certain person a diploma and what will be required for them to do so.

I agree with you that most educators can only apply a general method to the children to whom they are assigned, and while they may do individual things with certain children, they’re going to be very limited in terms of extent. Obviously, the greater the size of an individual educator’s class, the less individual attention an educator is going to be able to give to each particular student. However, some parents are not going to be capable of a general or specific method when it comes to getting the children to understand the material.

I’m not aware whether or not parents are made to take a general aptitude test with respect to subject knowledge and reading comprehension, but if they were and such a test were strenuous, then I’d probably be far more receptive to the possibility of supporting the position stated in the OP.

In summation, if the parents can’t do it, how can the parents teach the kids to do it?

I don’t think the question of teacher accountability necessarily merits discussion because I fail to see where the parents are accountable to absolutely do better educating the child than a teacher will, furthermore, the parents aren’t even getting paid!

Some kids are simply incapable of achieving that minimum level of education due to their own personal mental limitations or lack of willpower in terms of doing what they have to do to be properly educated. This is especially the fault of the parents when it comes to a kid not having the drive to learn the material, it is the parent that fucked the kid up in that regard to begin with, the teacher (in such case) is simply trying to correct damage already done by the parent.

Of course you can pay for a tutor, but if the parents aren’t going to be forced (per legislation) to maintain these minimum guidelines for education in that subject matter anyway, then why would they motivated to get a tutor? Unless I find myself capable of learning (and teaching) science, and I don’t, then I’m most assuredly going to get a tutor for my kid should I decide to homeschool him, but without the guidelines in place, I wouldn’t necessarily have to.

Forgoing a child’s science education should not be an option. I may not have learned anythinbg about science, and I may not need science, but having to bust ass to get those D’s in college at least taught me something about perserverance. I should have only said that I breezed through H.S. in Science because I was a football player so the, “C’s,” were pretty much handed to me. I worked my ass for those, “D’s,” in Science in college, though. In the rest of the subjects, though, I would get A’s effortlessly, so I’d have never learned anything about willpower or perserverance had it not been for those Science classes.

I’m not assuming that you are on your own, but that you have the option to be on your own. I don’t think that a parent should have that option because it could be the case that the parent is an idiot in which event you have a child that ends up being, at best, an idiot. The child only rises to the level of being an idiot in the event that the parent successfully teaches the child everything that he/she knows, unless they seek external assistance!

Is there a college that doesn’t require a student to take at least one science course!? If so, the degree would almost have to be worthless!

The main point is, you have the State or the School District that is to issue this individual’s Diploma, so they should have some say in what is required for the person to get the Diploma.

One compromise I would be willing to come to is that a parent(s) can do whatever he/she/they want in terms of educating the child, but the child must take aptitude and subject knowledge tests every six months. The first time the child fails any of those tests, then the child must be enrolled in public, or an accredited private school, I’d probably be amenable to something like that.

I don’t want to argue with you, YOU’LL fuck me up…

(Resigned Sigh)

Okay, I guess I’ll try.

I agree with your position that children are not machines that can be perfectly understood, but to the same extent, we do not necessarily have a perfect understanding of the working of the brain. That having been said, a neurologist understands the workings of the brain better than a construction worker, nobody is going to be perfect when it comes to curing the ailments of dogs, but a veterinarian has a better shot at doing a respectable job than an accountant.

That’s the point, here. A properly trained educator has (at least) a reasonable chance of properly educating a child, and I’m not saying that there is no parent that can properly educate a child, I’m merely saying that some parents can not.

One should also keep in mind that in many cases the High School Diploma is granted by the State, or sometimes even the specific school district, so certainly they should have some influence as to whether or not they will grant a certain person a diploma and what will be required for them to do so.

I agree with you that most educators can only apply a general method to the children to whom they are assigned, and while they may do individual things with certain children, they’re going to be very limited in terms of extent. Obviously, the greater the size of an individual educator’s class, the less individual attention an educator is going to be able to give to each particular student. However, some parents are not going to be capable of a general or specific method when it comes to getting the children to understand the material.

I’m not aware whether or not parents are made to take a general aptitude test with respect to subject knowledge and reading comprehension, but if they were and such a test were strenuous, then I’d probably be far more receptive to the possibility of supporting the position stated in the OP.

In summation, if the parents can’t do it, how can the parents teach the kids to do it?

I don’t think the question of teacher accountability necessarily merits discussion because I fail to see where the parents are accountable to absolutely do better educating the child than a teacher will, furthermore, the parents aren’t even getting paid!

Some kids are simply incapable of achieving that minimum level of education due to their own personal mental limitations or lack of willpower in terms of doing what they have to do to be properly educated. This is especially the fault of the parents when it comes to a kid not having the drive to learn the material, it is the parent that fucked the kid up in that regard to begin with, the teacher (in such case) is simply trying to correct damage already done by the parent.

Of course you can pay for a tutor, but if the parents aren’t going to be forced (per legislation) to maintain these minimum guidelines for education in that subject matter anyway, then why would they motivated to get a tutor? Unless I find myself capable of learning (and teaching) science, and I don’t, then I’m most assuredly going to get a tutor for my kid should I decide to homeschool him, but without the guidelines in place, I wouldn’t necessarily have to.

Forgoing a child’s science education should not be an option. I may not have learned anythinbg about science, and I may not need science, but having to bust ass to get those D’s in college at least taught me something about perserverance. I should have only said that I breezed through H.S. in Science because I was a football player so the, “C’s,” were pretty much handed to me. I worked my ass for those, “D’s,” in Science in college, though. In the rest of the subjects, though, I would get A’s effortlessly, so I’d have never learned anything about willpower or perserverance had it not been for those Science classes.

I’m not assuming that you are on your own, but that you have the option to be on your own. I don’t think that a parent should have that option because it could be the case that the parent is an idiot in which event you have a child that ends up being, at best, an idiot. The child only rises to the level of being an idiot in the event that the parent successfully teaches the child everything that he/she knows, unless they seek external assistance!

Is there a college that doesn’t require a student to take at least one science course!? If so, the degree would almost have to be worthless!

The main point is, you have the State or the School District that is to issue this individual’s Diploma, so they should have some say in what is required for the person to get the Diploma.

One compromise I would be willing to come to is that a parent(s) can do whatever he/she/they want in terms of educating the child, but the child must take aptitude and subject knowledge tests every six months. The first time the child fails any of those tests, then the child must be enrolled in public, or an accredited private school, I’d probably be amenable to something like that.

Parents are always presumed (at least until proved otherwise) to be working for the best interests of their children. While parents are not perfect, and exceptions exist, they will generally be much more motivated to do what’s best for their children. Many parents are not capable, for a variety of reasons, to do a good job educating their children. However, most of those wouldn’t attempt homeschooling to begin with. I am far less convinced that the average level of education provided by the self-selected homeschoolong parent population is in any way inferior to that provided by state schools.

Homeschoolong is not easy for the parents. I would tend to trust those parents who choose homeschooling over bureaucratic, political, or ideological choices made at the political level.

If parents lack specific skills, a wide range of resources is available to help supplement their knowledge in specific areas.

To the extent that a school district issues a diploma, it is perfectly reasonable for them to want to test the children prior to issuing the diploma. However, the OP suggested that the requirements are categorical, rather than posed as conditions for diplomas.

As for your idea that continued homeschooling be conditional on passing bi-annual examinations, the logic is clear : failure of a child to pass such exams is a persuasive evidence for educational failure, right? So you would also advocate, following the same logic, that children attending state schools who fail such tests will be provided by the state with a voucher with which they can pay for a private school?

The HeartStart home-school method of dual brain education is designed to initially focus the attention of both parents on the ethical character development of their children during the infancy and childhood stages of development.

What is present in the child mind directly after the weaning process. is the naive -me/mine - here/now - selfish consciousness of the basic primate… After weaning and before the onset of puberty, the primary task of the parent is to evoke the child’s broader social consciousness of us/ours, by concentrating on the sharing and caring ethics which distinguishes the human from the ape.

This cultivated shift towards a sharing consciousness is a vital intellectual prerequisite for laying the foundations of an attentive consciousness, aware of its survival relationship with the rest of creation. It took Natural selection some ten million years to gradually evolve a specie with the ability to reflect on the self, and then see that self in its relationship to the rest of existence - and imprint that super-natural consciousness in the human gene pool. This ten million year investment via natural selection is the reason why human parents are not confronted with educating a chimpanzee from birth. Even so, it takes a full seven years of cultivated encouragement and discipline to bring the 200 million year old selfish primate instinct under reasonable control. If this humanizing cultivation is not tactfully accomplished during the childhood period of development, the underlying greedy ape continues to dominate consciousness into adulthood and the full creative potential of human consciousness remains only partially activated.

The first seven years of education are all about stimulating the intuitive and creative potentials of the right brain. The analytical powers of the left brain begin to influence consciousness around the seventh year. That is when the first rudimentary measurements of time and space begin to impinge on consciousness

Oral-based instruction, focused on the practical realities of the home is a far more natural and immediate method of seating basic emotional stability and evoking intelligent responses to disciplined behavior. It is only when the child has gained a heart-felt appreciation for the basic family values of sharing and caring, and a chore-based work ethic is properly seated, do we believe that the young psyche is properly prepared and ready to assimilate and evaluate textbook knowledge. Any effort to down-load that knowledge before the child’s own sense of self is seated is indoctrination not learning, plain and simple.

In any learning environment, emotional motivation of the intellect is always the central key. Tying a child to a school desk or a kitchen table for hours on end each day, in order to instill early literacy, is seen as more of as an artificial distraction from reality more than a motivational learning advantage. There are countless practical lessons in physical, verbal and mathematical skills to be found in play and by participating in the work and care of the home, garden and workshop. Field trips into Nature and community facilities broaden the natural learning curve.

Simply stated: By taking full advantage of parental care and ethical encouragement within the secure environment of the home, the basic intelligence under-pinning the sharing, caring and work ethics, which make the student conscious of the its obligations to the needs of others, are valued as natural prerequisites for focusing the full attention of the future scholar on the textbook lessons and instructions of academia. In addition, the healthy foundation of emotional and social intelligence that comes from not prematurely removing the child from parental care ensures well-grounded future social development.

The argument that late exposure to literature may stunt future adult intelligence has been proven by us to be entirely erroneous. Our research into right and left brain modes of perception has shown that by initially concentrating only on oral-based instruction the development of the child’s vocabulary as well as their memory retention, translates at puberty, after a few basic academic lessons, into free-flowing scripted compositions, which more naturally expresses their inner dialogue. Their prose is far less stilted than that of children who’s inner poetry of expression has been prematurely and artificially structured and stilted by the robotic mechanics of grammar in classroom-based instruction. Oral-based quizzing in mental arithmetic in the basics of counting, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, together with practical examples of measurements in the home workshop, kitchen and during play, also translated later into a natural grasp of mathematical theorems, algebraic equations and geometrical diagrams. When one recognizes that 100,000 generations of the behavioral instincts, inherited from our hunter/farmer/craftsmen ancestors, are imprinted in the human gene pool,
we can then accept that not just the eloquent socialist is present in the sub-conscious, but so is the physicist who knows all about tension, torque, trajectory and velocity - not to mention the natural sciences.

After twenty years of research and application we have found that HeartStart’s basic pre-literate training translates into a more mature, well-focused, well-motivated, self-policed, self-tutored teenage student, who, without adult supervision, rapidly masters textbook lessons and within a few months surpasses the grades of other scholars of their own peer group. The delay in textbook study ends up as a triple play - benefiting student, parents and nation. Ethical behavior, academic performance and responsible community commitments all get top marks.

In this natural learning environment during the first critical years of child development, another unexpected bonus trait has emerged. We have found, once puberty is reached, the rise of the self-determinant teenage instinct, which is symptomatic of a healthy pre-adult consciousness, is attracted to constructive, inter-dependent, thinking, rather than the rebellious independent reaction the tedium and boredom classroom restrictions tend to evoke. Our students maintain a sense of reverence and appreciation for ancestral effort. Eldership is respected. There is a desire within them to build upon the foundations already laid, rather than pull them down and start over again. The ancient Confucian injunction of filial piety is a tangible aspect of our graduate’s psyche. In plain terms: Family values remain the guiding principle in their lives.

When you juxtapose our natural approach, which does not interfere with a child’s emotional stability, against the current practice of prematurely separating a young child from its home and parents and forcing it to sit within the impersonal confines of a classroom studying text for most of the daylight hours, the artificial limitations of the compulsory education system is clear.

Less than 1% achieve excellence in state schools. 40% drop out before graduation. More than half cheat in some form during examinations. In contrast the 100% success ratio of the Heartstart method is fully justified by the superior high school examination results each of our graduates have achieved. (Their government-supervised test results, placing them in the top 3% of graduates in the nation, will be display later on.)

Even with all this said, we realize that such a radical departure from traditional methods of childhood education will still make it difficult for parents to accept the HeartStart approach. The idea that one’s child will remain illiterate until the onset of their teens confounds the conventional view on what it means to be intelligently cultivated. After ten generations of the same primary and secondary school customs, letting go of state-enforced textbook instruction and classroom incarceration for twelve years and more, and expecting to do far better at home, simply via oral instruction, is a difficult psychological hurdle for any parent to over-come.

The average parent has been systematically indoctrinated by the current school system to believe that only an academically-trained professional is qualified to teach their children. That state-controlled system of child education approaches the child psyche as though the mind is an empty vessel that needs to be down-loaded with technical data.

The HeartStart method is essentially a process of REMINDING the child of its innate genius. It accepts that the human psyche is genetically imprinted with a a hundred thousand generations of ancestral know-how - and that a carefully designed program of ethical encouragement will evoke the genetic inheritance of the hunter/farmer/craftsman/scientist and bring it to the fore of consciousness.

The love and care of parental guidance can evoke this inherent genius of their children far better than any professional teacher - and they do not need anything more than basic primary academic credentials to accomplish it.

The problem of legalizing the Heartstart home-schooling method remains. When our methodology was first proposed as a radical new approach to child development, without precedents to show that they would not end up mentally retarded, there was no way of assuring state education officials and getting them to allow such a sweeping change to be applied. We were thus more or less forced into deception. We retreated to a remote desert location and began the practice with our own children, away from the eyes of government school inspectors. As it stands now, even though we have proved the point beyond doubt with seven of our children, the official hurdle remains. Under current state and national laws it remains illegal for parents to withhold prescribed textbook instruction from their children from the age of six years onward. Until we get that resolved, ridiculous as it seems after the results we have achieved, parents who do not teach early literacy at home or in school can be charged and prosecuted for child abuse!

It is obvious that we would never have risked our children’s intellectual development and deliberately broken state laws and attempted such a radical departure from tradition, without sound reasons from the beginning of the program to do so.

Firstly; The initial motivation that began our research into alternate methods of child development was the common knowledge that current state-enforced education methods are failing. The United States which invest $50 billion on education, far more per child than any other country, ranks only 25th in education standards among 56 industrialized nations Every government and private effort and the extra billions spent to improve test scores has had little or no effect on standards.

Secondly, we were attracted in our research to existing scientific experiments showing how the brain actually assimilates knowledge. Both sides of the brain need to to be stimulated, not just the left brain as is currently practiced in state schools. This vital information on early brain development has been available for the last 40 years and never applied. If it had been taken note of and incorporated into public and private education programs a generation ago, the problems in education which we face today could very well have been vastly improved.

Thirdly we were deeply concerned with the on-going conflict of interests between Church and State and Science and Religion within the State classrooms. It is HeartStart’s position that technological training without the balance of spiritual evocation, not only robotizes the young psyche and robs it of its inspirational potential for original thinking, but also produces that class of scientific intellect that finds no ethical conflict in developing and deploying WMD’s

By addressing both sides of the brain equally, HeartStart’s dual brain program solves the controversy between creationism and evolution rather neatly. It accepts both perceptions - that the entire process of evolution. from the Big Bang onwards, is part and parcel of Divine Consciousness - that both design and random effect take part in the development and evolution of cosmic consciousness. This basic dual-brain premise dilutes neither mode of perception - in fact it enhances the precess of self understanding which is the fundamental purpose of education. There is ample reason for accepting both modes

All children are born with their right brains naturally superstitiously conscious of invisible forces affecting the workings in Nature. It is the reason why a world of fairy tales, Santa Clause, witches, imps and angels are so easily accepted by them as an alternate state of reality. Prematurely interfering with this profoundly imaginative state of meta-normal consciousness, which is every child’s birthright, prematurely introduces pseudo-intellectual argument into the developing psyche and confuses it with conflicting views of physical and metaphysical modes of perception.

From Kindergarten onwards left brain scientific indoctrination inside the classroom. systematically strips away and shuts off the metaphysical inspirations and potentials of the right brain. In the process not only does this summary dismissal of extra sensory perception upset the child psyche and suffocate its imaginative potentials, but the residual effect continues to confuse the adult mind and its instinctive sense of the invisible Presence. This confusion is reflected in the word “agnostic” which the majority of westerners use in a belated effort explain away our spiritual indecision.

The HeartStart program actively encourages extra-sensory perception, and in doing so, not only avoids confusing the child psyche with conflicting perceptions of reality, but also employs superstition instincts in dealing with the universally insoluble problem of crime and punishment. Nothing agonizes a caring parent more than inflicting punishment on a disobedient child and in deciding how to do it. years of careful guidance can end in alienation because of one wrong decision. Yet correction is an essential aspect of education. And pain is always the bottom line. So what to do?

Let Nature Herself take care of it!!
Evoke the natural Laws of Cause and Effect!
and Non-trespass!

As soon as the infant is weaned, from the age of four onwards when it can fully understand basic instructions, the parent can inform the child that any destructive act, selfish attitude or even just a disobedient thought, would result sooner or latter, and in many cases almost immediately, in a scratch, bump, bite or cut and would receive little sympathy from the parent. Two amazing
results follow. After only a few warnings the child begins to notice and take more care of its own behavior and rarely comes running and crying after an “accident” takes place. Secondly, because there are no “accidents” when hurt the child never sees itself as a helpless victim of circumstances - but as the initiator of its own karma.

Thus, instead of superstition being seen as a primitively limiting concept that most moderns ridicule, it acts instead as a powerful stimulant for a positive intellect and a more profound respect for the universal Nature of Goodness.

The net result is that our students have ended up with a life-long reverence for all life and the depth of responsibility for protecting it that has fallen on our specie. They graduate not with the selfish desire for private ownership, but the selflessness of the custodian and the constructive ambition of the global steward.

Our emphasis on right brain spiritual evocation has made the HeartStart method such a resounding success with our own children. We have found that if strong parental emphasis is placed on the sharing and caring ethic between siblings soon after weaning, followed by the introduction of yoga and meditation techniques which evokes further development of the right brain at around seven years of age; that contact with the spiritual over-seer within the self is far more vital than knowledge of technology.

The sheer importance of this right brain realization cannot be over-emphasized. It is the secret door to internal wisdom that every educator from the academies of the ancient Greeks onwards has sought to open.

Know Thyself.

That simple injunction is inscribed on Plato’s pedestal.

If the self is ethically behaved, if there is little or no guilty feelings of deceit to cloud that clear view, pride in that sense of personal excellence opens an inner door to an infinite reservoir of creative intelligence and forms a permanent motivator for acquiring all further knowledge and practical skills

The final questions regarding the effectiveness of the HeartStart program, concern the further development of the child’s socialization skills outside the home and family, and the financial burden. How is the family to be supported if both parents are occupied full time executing the program?

Both these questions are answered if all the ethical and academic benefits listed above, convince the population that the failing state-controlled education system has had its day and should be phased out in favor of parental control.
.Such a mass policy shift in national education will have far-reaching ramifications – all of them positive.

First of all the $50 billion now spent annually on education will become available for family support.

Secondly. $5 trillion of the $9 trillion spent annually by the government on the administration of the country is more or less wasted on a vast system of bureaucratic over-sight, primarily designed to legislate and police the endless laws that regulate and protect the civil rights of the majority of law-abiding citizens from the unscrupulous practices of the minority.

Not including the current massive swindle on the stock market that has crashed the national economy, the accelerated annual rise in the prison population is a clear indicator that this regulatory system is also failing. As already stated, the basic cause of this national distrust is rooted in the current school system which fails to motivate 99% of its students to rise above mediocrity and failure to complete their education and reach for the very best within themselves.

The ethical nature of the HeartStart program will restore citizen’s trust in each other and at the very least reduce government regulation by half. This makes trillions of more dollars available for family and home support. Much of this saved money can be invested by instilling a vital sense of home pride - by riding the country of tens of millions of trashy trailer homes and allowing families to build and care for proper home estates.

Thirdly, the removal of millions of parents from the market place, paying them an adequate amount of money to stay at home to raise and educate ethical citizens, puts an effective end to the national unemployment rate and gives every graduate a secured position on the market.

Fourthly. The vast national education infrastructure of primary and secondary schools becomes available for revision – most of this local, state and federal property can be sold off, generating tens of trillions of dollars that can square off the national debt and put money in the bank. Current school playing fields, gymnasiums, swimming pools etc. - together with science laboratories and some classroom space can be kept on in every neighborhood and made freely available for the home-school family use and allow free space to organize sports teams and social gatherings.

I think that is probably a fair presumption, but I also think that there would end up being many parents where a child may not end up respecting their authority as far as education goes, but then the parent doesn’t want to send the kid to school as an admission of defeat.

Like I said, as long as we have some sort of criteria by which an individual would be effectively forced into the public education system if they were not up to snuff, and let’s say they have to fail two consecutive aptitude tests, then I’m mostly fine with the whole thing. I think that the education also needs to be multi-faceted with respect to subjects too, which is to say, this shouldn’t be done on a do whatever you want however you want to do it basis.

Agreed. In which event, it is incumbent upon the parent to take advantage of those resources. If the parent either will not, can not or did not take advantage of those resources, then the state should step in and put the child into the public school system.

True, making that aspect of my argument something of a strawman. Unintentional, but still a strawman, my apologies to you and MagnetMan.

I would not advocate any such thing because I view state education as the default and both private and homeschooling as alternatives to the default. Homeschooling, especially, because it falls outside what we might consider the, “Norm,” in terms of what percentage does what. I don’t have figures in front of me, but I’m sure we can agree that more kids are sent to private school than are homeschooled.

Anyway, if the parent fails, then the student can be sent to private school if it is affordable, or public school.

I don’t think a student attending a state school should get a private school voucher for failing, but that the parent should be given the option of homeschooling that child. An option, of course, that they already have anyway. In the event that homeschooling has failed AND public schooling has failed, the kid is either just lazy or is an idiot, just leave him in public school and hope for the best unless you can afford (and are so inclined) to put him in private.

Before answering your concerns
I am surprised that you do not address my claim that the current system is not only an abject failure
it is also down-grading human potential
Let me quote the stats again

Only 1% excel in all subjects
40% drop out before graduation
59% are only half motivated
exam cheating is epidemic - with no holistic program dealing with this serious aberration

I better bet would be to set up parental home-school councilling centers
and help them get their kids back on track

The HeartStart method evokes personal excellence during the developmental years before the onset of puberty.

A formal initiation rite at puberty
recognizing their entry into adulthood
focuses the young psyche on its larger community responsibilities
they realize themselves that they need to excel at academics
in my kid’s case
after less than a week of first grade lessons in grammar and maths from me
they wanted to tutor themselves and refused further academic help

the internet gave my kids direct access to any subject
within three months, fascinated with transferring thoughts onto paper
each and every one got busy writing 300 page novels
they loved the state exams of the 8th and 12th grades
it gave each one a distinct academic target to shoot for
a score to measure their progress on
they all shot for straight A’s in all subjects
and were down-hearted at any B
all graduated high school exams within three years
among the top 10% in the nation
all tutoring done by themselves
at less than 10 hours of study per week
at zero cost to the state
and at 1/20th of the time

I’m not suggesting that the current system doesn’t occasionally fail, although, I would suggest that it doesn’t really downgrade human potential because people are still free to independently study whatever it is that they want to.

1.) As far as only 1% of students excelling in all subjects is concerned, that’s just tricky language. Think about the word, “Excel,” if everyone did it, then it would merely be average and would drive the definition of, “Excel,” up even more. If everyone that did average now started doing horribly, then the old average would be what is considered excelling. That’s strictly a language trick statistic for shock value, nothing more or less.

2.) That’s (40% dropout) just an inaccurate statistic. In 2007, 27.6% of Hispanics dropped out and 21% of African-Americans dropped out. (Those were the two highest) The overall rate was only 16% and some of them get GED’s anyway, so they only temporarily even count as people that failed to graduate. (1)

As a matter of fact, if you combine the data from the graphs on pages 7 and 8, then you will find that 1,833,312/6,173,883, or, 29.7% of those drop-outs are estimated to get GED’s by the time they reach the age of 24 anyway. Of the 16% drop-outs then, when you take out the 30% that are expected to eventually get GED’s by the age of 24, then ultimately, by the age of 24 88-89% of all 16-24 year olds (those ages as of 2007) will end up with either a diploma or a GED.

By the way, those statistics included EVERYONE aged 16-24 in 2007.

Not too bad.

3.) I don’t know what 59% are half-motivated is even supposed to mean, so that statistic doesn’t interest me. The one thing I know is, if you’re a high school kid, it’s not especially, “Cool,” to define yourself as a highly motivated student, so even if you actually are, you’ll usually lie.

4.) Exam Cheating- Who cares? That’s real life, in real life people cheat. All’s fair in love and war and life’s a F***ing battle, my friend. If you get caught cheating, you’re screwed, if you don’t, you’re at an advantage. So, being a poor cheater is a detriment, being a good cheater is a life skill.

Why would you allocate additional taxpayer resources to the public school system when you already have actual schools? Your suggestion might be acceptable to me only if it’s some kind of fund the parents who choose to home-school pay into directly.

I can’t really answer for what your kids did or didn’t do or how or why they did it, but you seem like a Hell of a nice guy, so I’m certainly happy that your kids are successful.

(1) http://www.clms.neu.edu/publication/documents/CLMS_2009_Dropout_Report.pdf

improved is more accurate
so far it has taken 40 years of deprogramming
and i still feel uneasy

They are more successful than I am
even after all the clean-up work I have been doing on my past
they don’t carry all my old baggage
but as little of it has I could try not to pass on

They were all part of the HeartStart experiment
from pre-natal prep until now

four of them are now adults
three of whom live with me
i find it an endless delight to be included in their company

Their children will be born and raised even cleaner
I already have an 8 year old grandson
who already outshines all of us
so I already have assurance that our families future fortune
is on the right path
into the 21st Century

In this home-schooled manner
the residual effects of their father’s and grand-father’s and great-grandfather’s
educational dysfunctions
going back five generations
gets purified generation by generation

and beyond

(1) http://www.clms.neu.edu/publication/documents/CLMS_2009_Dropout_Report.pdf
[/quote]
as to the above
thank you for the link
mine needs a second check
I will get back to you on that :smiley: