The Myth Of The Hero.

Who is the Hero?

The Hero is the one who vanquishes evil in the name of a moral ideal where those outside of such realms become embedded to his justice onto being slaughtered or imprisoned by the constructed virtue passed down to him by his father and mother which was passed on to them by a infinite number of generations before them.

Essentially the hero is a radiant beacon in which he uses force, violence and death upon any that threatens the moral fabric of himself or his forefathers.

For some 2000 odd years in civilization the hero has been given a pass positioned to be a symbolic reference that all people strive to achieve by that sweet honey of the state where we worship that which is the opposite of our natural instincts in complete glorification of an heroic ideal which only tears ourselves farther away from our intrinsic nature.

When do we hear any position of that from what we call the criminal or villain?

Why do we not glorify their criminal deeds and actions?

Is the villain any different from that of the person called a hero?

The myth of the hero was made for the expansion of moral ideals hence it is a great benefactor of civilization, or atleast that is what other people say.

It is the antagonist (“evil”) that makes protagonist who he is, the hero. The hero is nobody without the the “villain”. In fact, the hero and the villain are probably the same, except one is in denial. So, the one who wants to be the “hero” resorts to scapegoating to make himself feel better.

The hero and the anti-hero have their own journey’s but they’re both considered ‘heroes’ in their own minds.

Joseph Campbell’s A hero with a Thousand Faces addresses this.

When do we hear any position of that from what we call the criminal or villain?

There are lots of stories where it is told from the criminals position. I am watching one right now called “Dog Day Afternoon.”

Why do we not glorify their criminal deeds and actions?

Was not “Robin Hood” a glorification of the criminal? Or “V for Vendetta.” Look up Guy Fawkes. Also what about the dirty hippies who broke into administration buildings and burnt draft papers? There are countless video games, movies and music that glorify criminal lifestyles. Maybe even more of them then the opposite.

Is the villain any different from that of the person called a hero?

It is mostly subjective. Sometimes the criminal is the hero, like in Robin Hood.

Actually, the concept of the “anti-hero” was very popular in the 1930’s especially in noir, or “gangster” movies an novels, and it can still be found in modern cinema.

I don’t mean to imply that I agree with that style, because I don’t; I’m very much a hero-worshipper.

Yes. Joseph Campbell should be a known name to philosophers.